Tag Archives: Technology

A group of students from CSUN won the software competition called, “ ”SS12: Code for a Cause” in San Diego earlier this month.  They designed a phone app alert system for the deaf.  

ViviTouch has come up with some technology to allow deaf and hard of hearing people to feel sounds.  The ViviTouch headphones produce very distinct feelings for different sounds.

Technology for Automatic Captions

Interact-AS is already provided to most federal employees.  This may be a helpful communication tool for deaf and hard of hearing people everywhere.   This technology allows the other person to either write, type, or speak, and the technology converts those types of input to captions for the deaf or hard of hearing person.  It also allows the […]

Deaf and hard of hearing associations congratulated four of U.S.A.’s largest wireless carriers for voluntarily agreeing to make sure text can be used to call 9-1-1.  They said they will accelerate the availability of text to 9-1-1, and it should be available all over the U.S.A. by May 15, 2014.

Proposed FCC Action Threatens Future VRS Services

The Greater Los Angeles Agency on Deafness has asked people to “Save My VRS.”  Sorenson initiated the “Save My VRS” campaign in response to proposed regulations from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).  The FCC has proposed to replace Video Relay Service (VRS) with Smart TV’s and IPADs, and those are not designed for deaf and hard of hearing […]

The National Deaf-Blind Equipment Program (NDBEDP) provides Deaf-Blind people with communication technology.  The I Can Connect website has information on how the program works.  It also has a list of providers in different states.   The program promoted by I Can Connect provides training and telecommunication assistance for Deaf-Blind people who meet federal eligibility guidelines.

The Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center has recently release a new survey regarding emergency communications.  They want to hear from people with disabilities to find out about your experiences with calling 911 for emergency services.  If you have a disability, they also want to find out about your experiences with emergency bulletins.      

Many movies in theatres are not accessible to deaf and hard of hearing people.  This month, advocates for deaf and hard of hearing people are urging movie theatres to provide captions for movies.  An online press room has been set up to provide information about this captioning campaign.  The campaign is sponsored by the Collaborative […]

Researchers have found a part of the ear functioning like a natural battery.  They tested implants of low-power chips on guinea pigs.  The guinea pigs were able to hear sounds in the normal range after getting those chips.  They are not ready to test these chips on humans yet.

  Calling all education professionals and parents of Deaf and hard of hearing children: The Coalition of Organizations (COAT) provided some information regarding a grant from the U.S. Department of Education regarding accessible technology.  The $647 million grant was given to researchers at the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education (ISKME) in […]

Yoga Class in the Car

On my way to yoga class, I’m not sure which way to go. The road splits, and my instinct says left but Mapquest says right. I ignore my gut and follow the computer’s instructions.

Oops.

Turing around in the greater Washington DC area is nearly impossible. One road leads to a twisted mass of other roads and within 10 minutes I’ve crossed three borders, hitting Maryland, Washington DC, and Virginia. There are cars everywhere. Jammed along the freeway. Weaving in front of me as they merge. And my mind races with them.

In my head I’m caught up in the emotional turmoil of living in a new city. I want to move back to our original home in California where I know the streets like the back of my hand and can walk to yoga class. The clock is inching forward. By the time I figure out where I am it’s too late. I’ve missed the class.

I’m waiting at a stop sign when a woman in a minivan bumps the rear of my car.

Argh!” I yell (okay technically I yell a cuss word, but this is a G-rated blog).

As I pull over into a parking lot my instinct says stop and breathe. This time I listen. Just because I’m not in yoga class doesn’t mean I can’t practice yoga. I have my body, mind, and soul right here in the car with me — I don’t need a mat, a blanket, or the wood floor of a studio.

In inhale deeply and lengthen my spine. I meditate on my breath and seek inner stillness. By the time I step out of the car I feel a hundred times better. The woman in the minivan is apologetic and wants to make sure I’m okay and my car’s okay.

There is only a small scrape on the back bumper.

“Don’t worry about it,” I say. “This car is 10 years old.”

We wave goodbye to each other and drive our separate ways. On the way home I continue to practice my breathing. My blue mat is still rolled up on the passenger’s seat. And the roads are still packed with cars and noisy construction and confusing twisting turns. But inside, I’m slowly finding silence.

Finding Flexibility in Inflexibility

Week 2 of my six-week stint at a newspaper is coming to a close. Four more weeks to go. It’s a blessing, as a freelancer, to have the opportunity to be a part of these projects (steady work! money! live interaction with creatures other than my dog!). But man, the corporate life wipes me out.

I get home from work about 7:30 p.m., make dinner, eat, and plop into bed by 9:00 p.m., exhausted, where I drag my laptop on my lap and spend another couple of hours swaying between vegging out and trying to keep up with my other assignments. The evening yoga class I’d planned to attend? Skipped again.

The other night during one of my zombie-like states, I was flipping through Yoga Journal magazine. The question of the month just so happened to be from a reader who wants to dedicate more time to a yoga practice but finds that work leaves little time or energy to do so.

The yogi who answered the reader question suggested three options (1) back off of a less fulfilling activity and replace it with yoga; (2) spend less time working and more time practicing (which probably means adjusting your standard of living since you’ll presumably make less money if you cut back on work); or (3) make yoga a priority in your free time.

For now I’m choosing option three — switching to a weekend yoga class instead of trying to cram a class in after work when I’m tired and hungry.

Do you have an inflexible schedule that makes practicing yoga more challenging? How do you adjust?

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