Tag Archives: research

ViviTouch has come up with some technology to allow deaf and hard of hearing people to feel sounds.  The ViviTouch headphones produce very distinct feelings for different sounds.

The Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center has recently release a new survey regarding emergency communications.  They want to hear from people with disabilities to find out about your experiences with calling 911 for emergency services.  If you have a disability, they also want to find out about your experiences with emergency bulletins.      

Researchers have found a part of the ear functioning like a natural battery.  They tested implants of low-power chips on guinea pigs.  The guinea pigs were able to hear sounds in the normal range after getting those chips.  They are not ready to test these chips on humans yet.

Science Daily published that article on September 28, 2012.  This article summarized research regarding children and how they process language.  The first part of the article was not about Deaf children.  Some Spanish researchers in Spain researched the relationship between language and different types of perception. The second part of the article from Science Daily […]

  Calling all education professionals and parents of Deaf and hard of hearing children: The Coalition of Organizations (COAT) provided some information regarding a grant from the U.S. Department of Education regarding accessible technology.  The $647 million grant was given to researchers at the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education (ISKME) in […]

Stem cell research has been done on gerbils, which are similar to hamsters, to restore hearing to deaf gerbils.  Researchers in England used stem cells to grow new nerve cells.  They replaced the damaged nerve cells with the new nerve cells.   They are not ready to experiment on humans, and it doesn’t help people who lose […]

I was amazed to hear about a deaf dolphin.  Have you ever heard of a deaf dolphin?  The dolphin, named Sassafras, was found off the coast in Louisiana.  Sassafras is considered to be deaf because he is “deaf” in terms of hearing dolphin sonar.  A research facility in Gulfport, Mississippi contacted the Audubon Nature Institute because he […]

Gene therapy may be able to reverse hearing loss.  Some mice who were born deaf were injected into the inner ear with a gene, and it restored hearing in all of the deaf mice.  The injections did not damage the inner ear, and it even corrected some structural defects in the inner hair cells. Lawrence Lustig […]

The College of Education at Georgia State University received a $10 million grant to work on improving reading skills for children with hearing loss ranging from mild to profound deafness.  The research will examine techniques for teaching reading skills and assess the effectiveness of those techniques. Gallaudet University released a report on this topic in […]

Deaf children benefit from learning sign language and another language, according to research from LaTrobe University in Australia.  ASL can help children become bilingual.  ASL helps them develop a written and spoken language. Many doctors and audiologists discourage parents from teaching ASL to Deaf children.  This research shows Deaf children learn the written and spoken language more […]

All in a Day’s Work

The dishes needed washing. There were two huge stacks – one by the sink and another over by the stove. One downside to cooking from scratch.

“All we had was salmon and spinach,” my husband said.

“But the teriyaki marinade* was homemade, remember?” Plus, during lunch, I’d been experimenting with homemade pasta sauce.

The dishes sat overnight. Today, evaluating the mess, I realized the entire kitchen needed attention – countertops, floors, fridge – along with the dining room, family room, and bathrooms.

I’ve never been obsessed with cleaning, but even this mess was grating on me.

On the other hand, it was 60 degrees and sunny outside. And I’ve been waiting for this weather since November.

But then again my parents were coming to visit later in the week, so I knew I really should tidy up.

I wasted 20 minutes debating, which included a phone consultation with my husband:

Him: You should definitely rollerblade – the weather is great.
Me: But I was going to wash all those dishes.
Him: Well, on second thought . . .

And an internal argument over the merits of what it means to be a person who writes about mindful living:

Me: A Zen Master of Cleaning would emphasize the importance of living an “uncluttered” life.
Me: But fresh air and exercise will balance out your day.

In the end I decided to blade. The President’s Challenge is underway and I committed to participating on this very blog . . . so you know . . . rollerblading is part of my job.

~~~

*Teriyaki Sauce from The Maker’s Diet: 1 T fresh, grated ginger; 3 cloves garlic, mashed; 1 T toasted sesame oil; 1 T rice vinegar; 1 T raw honey; ½ cup of soy sauce. Whisk together.

Addicting Appetizer

Here is one of my favorite appetizers involving Wasa crispbread.

I searched Wasa’s recipe page and it’s on not on there, so I’m feeling rather innovative (except that I didn’t create it – the recipe was passed along by a friend of mine, but anyway . . .)

Spread a layer of organic cream cheese on Wasa crispbread.
Add two slices of cucumber.
Season with garlic power and sea salt.
Enjoy.

Drishti

“Find a point on the ground about a foot in front of your mat and softly fix your gaze on it.”

I’ve heard that instruction tons of times in various yoga classes (depending on the pose, the point of focus changes). It helps me with balance poses, like Tree pose. The other day in class, the teacher was giving that same instruction. Softly is the key word. It’s not an intense stare. “It’s almost like you’re looking behind your eyes,” she said. “It’s called Drishti.”

I never knew it had a name before.

Skinny Female Dog

Have you read the book Skinny Female Dog yet? (That’s not the real title, but I don’t like to cuss on blogs.) I laughed my way through it with advice like “All carbs are not created equal. There are two types: simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates suck and are as nutritionally beneficial as toilet paper.” The authors’ big tip throughout the book was to “use your head” when you make choices about eating. They are proponents of no meat and no dairy. I’m of the mindset that I need a little of those food groups for a well-balanced diet (my head says there’s something not quite right about a replacing meat and dairy with soymilk, soy “cheese,” soy “meat,” etc. – BUT that’s just me. The book has some great info in there and is worth the read.)

Moving on, the point I’m trying to make is that I visited the authors’ website the other day. Watch their Video Interview. I loved it. It took one of the author’s seven years to transform her eating habits. The other one – ten years. Their message is so clear and true: the goal is to eat well and do the best you can, but no one is perfect. It’s takes time to change your diet. Taste buds need to be retrained. Moving towards healthier foods is a progression. You give up what you can and don’t beat yourself up when you eat something less than ideal.  Š

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