Tag Archives: OBIT

Dr. Victor Henry Galloway, who was the first Deaf superintendent of the Texas School for the Deaf during the 1980′s, was also the first Deaf superintendent of the Scranton State School for the Deaf in Pennsylvania from 1979 – 1981.  He died on January 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  He was survived by his wife, Mrs. […]

Obit: Former Deaf School Teacher

Damaris Jean (Thompson) Copperud died unexpectedly on July 19, 2012 at her home in Oakland. She was born in Minnesota, and she received her master’s degree from Gallaudet in Washington, D.C.  She taught at the California School for the Deaf (Berkeley and Fremont) for 40 years.  After she retired in 1986, she pursued her hobbies, […]

Lupe Ontiveros, an actress, died July 26 of liver cancer at age 69.  Her memorial service was open to the public. Ontiveros, a former social worker, is best known for her roles in the films “Selena,” and “Real Women Have Curves,” and a recurring role in TV’s “Desperate Housewives.” Since two of her sons and […]

Obituary – George W. Johnston Jr George William Johnston Jr. passed away on Wednesday, May 9, 2012, in Haven Hospice at JFK Medical Center in Edison, N.J. Family and friends are invited to attend the visitation on Saturday, May 12, 2012, from 1 to 3 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. in the McCriskin-Gustafson Home […]

Deaf Sports Leader 11/25/2011 Clyde D. Wilson, 91, a graduate of the Ohio State School for the Deaf, founded, led and/or participated in softball, basketball and bowling organizations for hearing impaired athletes. According to the obit in the Akron Beacon Journal, Wilson founded the Tri-State Deaf Softball Association Tournament in 1940. From 1942 to 1944 […]

Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) Written by James Goodman Staff writer Joan Stone knew how to bring out the best in people. During the 13 years she served as interim dean and…

In Loving Memory of Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Forestal “…in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count, it’s the life in your years.” — Abraham Lincoln Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Harold Forestal, 71, passed away on May 11, 2011 after a sudden illness. He was born and raised in Asbury Park, New Jersey […]

West River, MD SHIRLEY JORDAN, 76, RETIRED GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR Shirley Cranwill Jordan, 76, passed away at home on March 30, 2011. Shirley was born on April 11, 1934 in Pennsylvania but moved as a young child to Flint, Michigan, where she grew up on the campus of the Michigan School for the Deaf, moving […]

James N. Freehof, 81 James N. Freehof, architect and creator of program to organize drawings, dies

Obituary: Jason Wister Ammons

In Memoriam- Jason Wister Ammons “A true Southern gentleman who knew no enemies”

Internet Yoga

Yoga has gone high tech.

In the last few weeks I’ve come across three different websites offering “online” yoga classes.

Core Power Yoga (click “yoga on demand”)

Yoga Today (offering “outdoor” yoga classes)

&

Jiva Diva (scroll down to “live classes”)

All three sites give free classes or trial runs. I’m seriously considering trying one out because I’m about to head to Colorado for a mountain retreat for two weeks. The last time I was on retreat I found a gem of a yoga teacher who gave 90 minute private lessons out of her home for $25 (talk about a deal!). But she’s now home-schooling her kids and doesn’t have time for another student (me).

So…I’m thinking of logging on to my computer for Downward-Facing Dog time. But after debating which site to try, I actually decided that instead of Internet classes, I am going to take this time to better develop my own home practice. Tune-in next week to see if I can recall the sequence for Sun Salutations and figure out how to move into Trikonasana (Triangle Pose) without my yoga teacher prodding me to firm my thighs. I’m looking forward to rolling out my mat by my bedside and trusting myself and my practice (okay, I might bring a book of poses for a little cheat sheet, but mostly I’ll be on my own).Š

Holidays are Changing

I’m trying to talk my parents and in-laws into coming to our place for Thanksgiving.

Ever since leaving for college at age 18, I’ve traveled over the holidays.

My hubby and I are moving in early November, and we’ll hopefully be settled into our new place by Turkey Day. I’d hate to move in and then turn around and leave right away. Plus, it sounds fun to host the holidays. Of course, I’ve never cooked a Thanksgiving dinner before, but a minor detail, right? I can figure it out.

One year I asked my mom if she’d teach me to cook the turkey. I arrived at her house ready to tackle the bird and learn how to make stuffing. My grandmother was visiting too. The two of them have been taking on Thanksgiving together forever, and despite my good intentions, everyone fell into their normal roles that year. My brother helped mash the potatoes, my dad prepared to carve, I found myself setting the table, pouring the wine, and arranging the relish tray. My mom and grandmother had their own rhythm and didn’t need anyone – including me – butting in. Or maybe I simply got distracted watching whatever movies my brother had rented from the video store. Either way, I never learned how to bake a turkey. (Actually, bake or roast?)

This year will be different. My grandmother no longer travels. One of my brothers is married and will be away. I’ve pegged the local, sustainable farm where I plan to purchase Mr. Tom. (For any vegetarians, here are some recipes I stumbled across on GentleThanksgiving.org).

My parents jumped on the chance to come to my place for a change. I hope my in-laws do too.

Times are changing. Times are changing.

Part of me is nervous about altering the rhythm of our holiday, but I’m excited too.

Halloween

I’m debating what to do about Halloween.

I loved dressing up and collecting candy as a kid. But as an adult – and someone with a growing awareness of our country’s health crisis – I don’t want to encourage the consumption of sugar, high fructose corn syrup, artificial flavorings…you get the idea.

I could hand out boxes of raisins, but I hated that as a child.

I could hand out toothbrushes, but again, that’s no fun.

I could bake something – treats using crispy brown rice cereal and natural peanut butter – but I know homemade goods would get thrown out by vigilant parents.

I have a friend who has her kids put their loot in a pile before bed. During the night the Great Pumpkin comes and Poof! their candy is turned into little games and trinkets from the dollar store. I also know a dentist who gives money in exchange for the kids who turn in their candy.

Hmm.

I was reading a recent issue of Body & Soul magazine and saw a small article on fair trade. Most chocolate, the article said, is exported from the Ivory Coast where kids aren’t going to school because they’re working on cocoa farms to help with family income. Buying fair trade products ensures that the money goes directly to the farmers and their communities instead of all the middlemen. And it just so happens that you can buy individually wrapped pieces of fair trade dark chocolate (according to some studies, dark chocolate does have a few health benefits).

Click here for a link to the article and a list of the companies.

Tadalafil – Branded or Generic?

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is easily the worst woe that a man will ever encounter as he no longer has the capacity to please both himself and his partner.  Fortunately, ED medications are aplenty with tadalafil being the most popular amongst couples.  However, when it comes to buying ED medications, is it better to go for branded or generic?

If you are not familiar with generic drugs, the name that identifies a generic drug is usually the active ingredient that the treatment has.  For generic tadalafil, it means that tadalafil is the active ingredient of the drug.  Usually, generic drugs are derived from branded drugs, the likes that had spent a lot of money in the research and development of the medication.  Normally, they are given several years of rights as sole maker and distributor of the drug to make up for the cost of the drug’s R&D.  In the case of generic tadalafil, it is Eli Lilly that did research as well as manufacturing of the drug Cialis – the branded version of generic tadalafil.  Like all drugs though, no manufacturer has sole rights to the making and distribution of the medication for a very long time which is why the ingredients used in the making of the drug are released and generic drug manufacturers are able to copy them and resell the drug for their own, provided of course they pay royalty as well as sell the drug only as generic in name. Read more…

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