Tag Archives: OBIT

Dr. Victor Henry Galloway, who was the first Deaf superintendent of the Texas School for the Deaf during the 1980′s, was also the first Deaf superintendent of the Scranton State School for the Deaf in Pennsylvania from 1979 – 1981.  He died on January 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  He was survived by his wife, Mrs. […]

Obit: Former Deaf School Teacher

Damaris Jean (Thompson) Copperud died unexpectedly on July 19, 2012 at her home in Oakland. She was born in Minnesota, and she received her master’s degree from Gallaudet in Washington, D.C.  She taught at the California School for the Deaf (Berkeley and Fremont) for 40 years.  After she retired in 1986, she pursued her hobbies, […]

Lupe Ontiveros, an actress, died July 26 of liver cancer at age 69.  Her memorial service was open to the public. Ontiveros, a former social worker, is best known for her roles in the films “Selena,” and “Real Women Have Curves,” and a recurring role in TV’s “Desperate Housewives.” Since two of her sons and […]

Obituary – George W. Johnston Jr George William Johnston Jr. passed away on Wednesday, May 9, 2012, in Haven Hospice at JFK Medical Center in Edison, N.J. Family and friends are invited to attend the visitation on Saturday, May 12, 2012, from 1 to 3 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. in the McCriskin-Gustafson Home […]

Deaf Sports Leader 11/25/2011 Clyde D. Wilson, 91, a graduate of the Ohio State School for the Deaf, founded, led and/or participated in softball, basketball and bowling organizations for hearing impaired athletes. According to the obit in the Akron Beacon Journal, Wilson founded the Tri-State Deaf Softball Association Tournament in 1940. From 1942 to 1944 […]

Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) Written by James Goodman Staff writer Joan Stone knew how to bring out the best in people. During the 13 years she served as interim dean and…

In Loving Memory of Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Forestal “…in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count, it’s the life in your years.” — Abraham Lincoln Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Harold Forestal, 71, passed away on May 11, 2011 after a sudden illness. He was born and raised in Asbury Park, New Jersey […]

West River, MD SHIRLEY JORDAN, 76, RETIRED GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR Shirley Cranwill Jordan, 76, passed away at home on March 30, 2011. Shirley was born on April 11, 1934 in Pennsylvania but moved as a young child to Flint, Michigan, where she grew up on the campus of the Michigan School for the Deaf, moving […]

James N. Freehof, 81 James N. Freehof, architect and creator of program to organize drawings, dies

Obituary: Jason Wister Ammons

In Memoriam- Jason Wister Ammons “A true Southern gentleman who knew no enemies”

Basic Equipment

I enjoy the beginning of yoga class because the opening is generally “easy” – well, at least physically (the meditating part can bring up its own set of challenges).

But before we practice some of the more difficult poses, we usually we open by sitting in Sukhasana for a few minutes. And then maybe move onto our hands and knees to practice Dog Tilt and Cat Pose. It’s a place for gentle movements. A time to bring awareness to our breath.

The other day at the beginning of class, we were on our hands and knees with a neutral spine (tabletop). The teacher asked us to lift our right arm off the ground and straighten it so it pointed forward. Both of our arms were engaged. The left one pushing the floor away, and the right one reaching for the wall in front of us (in a way where we weren’t scrunching our shoulder blade up to our neck). She had us hold that position. For a long, long time. It was hard. (Don’t believe me? Try it.)

“Some poses can be deceptive,” the teacher said. “Not as easy as they seem.”

I love that about yoga. I love that I don’t need an expensive gym membership or fancy equipment or special shoes to build flexibility and strength. I just need my body, my mind, and my spirit.Š

Donation-Based Yoga

When I first moved to Washington DC, I was surprised to discover the average cost of a drop-in yoga class was $20. Back in California it was easy to find classes for almost half as much – maybe because there are yoga studios on practically every street corner in LA. Working off of a freelance writer’s budget, it is challenging to come up with the money for regular yoga classes. If you’re also on a tight budget, good news: yoga classes are and can be accessible to everyone. Many places offer a free class if you’re trying their yoga studio for the first time, and some instructors volunteer to give free classes on a regular basis. Bartering might be another option — attending yoga classes in exchange for working a few hours behind the desk. Finally, keep an eye out for donation-based classes. This growing movement suggests payment on a sliding scale, allowing students to pay what they can afford. To find out more about what options are available, simply ask. And most importantly, don’t forget to pay it forward by sharing with others what had been shared with you.

Like the Lotus

During closing, my hands are at my heart in prayer. The yoga teacher says to move my fingers so that only my thumbs and pinky are touching – the center is to remain open, like a flower. She says the lotus grows in the mud and opens up when the sun shines on it, and closes when it doesn’t. She says, “Remember that when life is murkey, and I’m struggling through the mud, to open up, like the lotus.”

Walking Barefoot

I’m at the BlogHer conference in downtown Chicago mingling with 800 other women (promise I’ll link to some great food and yoga blogs once I process all the info that’s pouring into my brain).

The first day, I decided to get some exercise by walking from the train station to the conference center. I was wearing sandals and carrying a heavy laptop bag. I got lost. One hour and five blisters later, I finally arrived. I was smart enough to take a cab back to the train station that night, but once I made it to the suburbs (where I’m staying with a friend) I had to walk another mile to their house. My friend’s husband, Brad, was with me, and he watched as I limped and cringed.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said as my sandals rubbed against my blisters.

I slipped off my shoes.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said again as the sharp little pebbles on the roads and sidewalks cut my feet.

“You’re a yoga blogger!” Brad said.

“What does that have to do with anything?” I asked.

“Some yogis walk over hot coals and stuff,” he pointed out.

Now that he mentioned it, I did recall reading a passage in a book about firewalking at a yoga retreat. Although none of the yoga classes I’ve attended have involved hot coals, we do practice in bare feet. Still, smooth wood floors and soft sticky mats may help strengthen my soul, but they don’t sturdy up the skin on my soles.

Walking home that night, I stepped off the sidewalk and onto the grass. It was long and cool and damp. It cushioned my bare feet and brushed in between my toes. I completely forgot about my blisters as I focused on how nice it felt to observe the world through from the bottom up. It had been a long time since I’ve walked barefoot in the grass.

To some, barefoot hiking is a hobby. Richard Frazine wrote a book about it called The Barefoot Hiker, and Common Ground, a sustainable living magazine, wrote an article about it here.

How often do we take time to feel the crunch of leaves or the slick slime of moss or the powder puffs of dirt through our feet and toes? Not to mention walking barefoot is gentle on the planet. I think I will start taking off my shoes more often, especially outside.

As quoted on this website, Sitting Bull said:  “Healthy feet can hear the very heart of Mother Earth.”

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