Tag Archives: OBIT

Dr. Victor Henry Galloway, who was the first Deaf superintendent of the Texas School for the Deaf during the 1980′s, was also the first Deaf superintendent of the Scranton State School for the Deaf in Pennsylvania from 1979 – 1981.  He died on January 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  He was survived by his wife, Mrs. […]

Obit: Former Deaf School Teacher

Damaris Jean (Thompson) Copperud died unexpectedly on July 19, 2012 at her home in Oakland. She was born in Minnesota, and she received her master’s degree from Gallaudet in Washington, D.C.  She taught at the California School for the Deaf (Berkeley and Fremont) for 40 years.  After she retired in 1986, she pursued her hobbies, […]

Lupe Ontiveros, an actress, died July 26 of liver cancer at age 69.  Her memorial service was open to the public. Ontiveros, a former social worker, is best known for her roles in the films “Selena,” and “Real Women Have Curves,” and a recurring role in TV’s “Desperate Housewives.” Since two of her sons and […]

Obituary – George W. Johnston Jr George William Johnston Jr. passed away on Wednesday, May 9, 2012, in Haven Hospice at JFK Medical Center in Edison, N.J. Family and friends are invited to attend the visitation on Saturday, May 12, 2012, from 1 to 3 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. in the McCriskin-Gustafson Home […]

Deaf Sports Leader 11/25/2011 Clyde D. Wilson, 91, a graduate of the Ohio State School for the Deaf, founded, led and/or participated in softball, basketball and bowling organizations for hearing impaired athletes. According to the obit in the Akron Beacon Journal, Wilson founded the Tri-State Deaf Softball Association Tournament in 1940. From 1942 to 1944 […]

Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) Written by James Goodman Staff writer Joan Stone knew how to bring out the best in people. During the 13 years she served as interim dean and…

In Loving Memory of Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Forestal “…in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count, it’s the life in your years.” — Abraham Lincoln Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Harold Forestal, 71, passed away on May 11, 2011 after a sudden illness. He was born and raised in Asbury Park, New Jersey […]

West River, MD SHIRLEY JORDAN, 76, RETIRED GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR Shirley Cranwill Jordan, 76, passed away at home on March 30, 2011. Shirley was born on April 11, 1934 in Pennsylvania but moved as a young child to Flint, Michigan, where she grew up on the campus of the Michigan School for the Deaf, moving […]

James N. Freehof, 81 James N. Freehof, architect and creator of program to organize drawings, dies

Obituary: Jason Wister Ammons

In Memoriam- Jason Wister Ammons “A true Southern gentleman who knew no enemies”

Wasa with Cottage Cheese, Strawberries and Blood Orange

Ingredients

4 ounces low fat cottage cheese
1 cup (6 ounces) fresh strawberries, chopped
½ teaspoon blood orange zest
1 teaspoon juice from a blood orange
2 teaspoons honey
4 pieces WASA Sourdough Rye Crispbread (May substitute WASA Multigrain, Hearty Rye, Sourdough Rye, or Oats Crispbread)

Directions

Mix together strawberries, ¼ teaspoon zest, blood orange juice, and honey in a small bowl.
Spread cottage cheese on cracker, top with mixture, and sprinkle with remaining zest.

TIP: May substitute any berries, peaches, apricots, or pineapple for strawberries. You can also substitute a regular orange for a blood orange.
Refrigerate leftovers for 3-4 days.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

 

Calories 322
Total Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 0.8 g
Cholesterol 5 mg
Sodium 641 g
Total Carbohydrate 65 g
Dietary Fiber 12 g
Protein 19 g
Calcium 100 mg

Mozzarella, Sun Dried Tomato and Kalamata Olive on Wasa Crispbread

Ingredients

2 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced thin
4 teaspoons sun dried tomatoes packed in oil, drained, chopped
½ tablespoon pine nuts
2 teaspoons Kalamata olives, pitted, sliced lengthwise into quarters
1 tablespoon fresh basil, thinly sliced
2 pieces WASA Multigrain Crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Toast pine nuts in small skillet until lightly browned, set aside.
Place 1 ounce mozzarella on each crispbread.
Sprinkle with ½ tablespoon of basil, 2 teaspoons sun dried tomatoes, 1 teaspoon Kalamata olives, ¼ teaspoon pine nuts. Serve immediately.

TIP: Substitute any nuts for pine nuts. Substitute feta cheese for mozzarella if desired.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 279
Total Fat 14 g
Saturated Fat 6 g
Cholesterol 36 mg
Sodium 584 mg
Total Carbohydrate 25 g
Dietary Fiber 5 g
Protein 17 g
Calcium 456 mg

Top 10 Reasons I Love My Juicer

10. My produce never goes to waste anymore

9. No cooking, baking, stirring, or waiting. Just slice, juice, and drink (well, and clean)

8. Extra veggies, extra veggies, extra veggies – for both me and my spouse

7. My dog likes the scraps (dry pulp) mixed in with her meal

6. I feel clean and healthy and energized

5. The machine also makes baby food, nut butters, and pasta

4. Studies show juicing helps prevents disease

3. Juicing offers a great source of enzymes which are often destroyed by heat in cooked foods

2. It is the only way I’ll incorporate beets into my diet

1. Homemade food is the best. Hands down.

I must admit I was nervous about buying a juicer. They aren’t cheap (around $200 for a good one) and I was afraid I’d find juicing too inconvenient, resulting in a new nice appliance simply gathering dust in the corner of the kitchen. But I can’t emphasize enough how much I love it!

One-Way Street

For years I pounded the pavement. As a runner, my feet hit the cement over and over as I competed in cross-country, track, and, as an adult, even a couple marathons.

My coaches always encouraged stretching, both before and after the runs, but for the most part, I was on a one-way street toward shortening and tighenting my muscles. Until I tried yoga, I had no idea what it really meant to enlongate them. Running made me so inflexible that because of my inability to touch my toes or do the splits, I thought I “couldn’t do yoga.” Yoga was for bendy people, like gymnasts.

Thank goodness I figured out my thinking was flawed at age 30 and not a minute later. The benefits of yoga for inflexible people are amazing. Yes, it’s true that having shorter muscles means I often need to use a lot of props and adjust my poses in way others don’t, but almost every single time I practice yoga, I find myself thinking, “This feels so good.” After years of heading “one way” I’m finally teaching my body to move in the opposite direction. Ahh.

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