Tag Archives: NTID

NTID News – November 8, 2010 Students, faculty and staff from RIT/NTID visited Bayer Material Sciences headquarters near Pittsburgh as part of the company’s Disability Mentoring Day. What do aspirin, bowling ball coatings and fertilizer have in common? They’re all produced by Bayer Corp., the U.S. subsidiary of Bayer AG, a global company with $30 […]

For Immediate Release                                     Contact: “Life After High School” Discussions Planned for Deaf Students and Their Teachers Sept. 10, 2010 – (DENVER, Colo.) – High school students who are deaf or hard of hearing and their parents will get ideas about life after high school at FutureQuest, a FREE one-day conference offered […]

Sgt. Tony Wallace Remembered

NTID News – September 1, 2010 Lexis Wallace, 12, and her father, Sgt. Tony Wallace, together in Ohio during a visit this summer. Sgt. Anthony Wallace was living his dream, working as a police officer in Alaska for the past four years. A Hall of Fame wrestler while attending Rochester Institute of Technology and the […]

NTID News – August 24, 2010 Tara Thorn, a graduate of NTID’s American Sign Language interpreting program, chats with a deaf man in Haiti during a visit in June. Thorn will return to Haiti this week where she hopes to open a school for deaf children. A graduate of NTID’s American Sign Language and Interpreting […]

NTID News – June 23, 2010 “Baby Dolls,” by Tiarra Hopson of Little Rock, Ark., won best photo illustration in the 2010 Digital Arts, Film and Animation Competition for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students.

Global Collaboration Strives to Break Stereotypes NTID News – June 21, 2010    Yohei Sasakawa, chairman of The Nippon Foundation of Japan, has provided funding for PEN-International since 2001. He spoke at the opening of the Technology and Deaf Education Symposium at RIT/NTID today. Photo by Mark Benjamin, NTID.

Student Focused on His Future

James DeCaro Inducted into RIT’s Innovation Hall of Fame NTID News – May 3, 2010    NTID Interim President James J. DeCaro was inducted in the inaugural class of RIT’s Innovation Hall of Fame. See full-size photo NTID Interim President James J. DeCaro was one of 10 prominent men and women inducted into the inaugural […]

RIT ANNOUNCES CAMP FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH HEARING LOSS ROCHESTER, N.Y. (April 30, 2010) -African-American, Latino American and Native American students with hearing loss who are entering 7th, 8th, or 9th grade are invited to Steps to Success, a career exploration weekend camp August 6 – 8 at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical […]

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

Herbs

One of my husbands charms is that if it’s my birthday, or a holiday, or some other gift-giving event, he’ll sneak in a surprise present – a little something extra that wasn’t on my list that he thought of completely on his own. For example, one year he gave me a handheld Ms. Pac-Man game because he knew I used to love Ms. Pac-Man s a kid (one time we came across the video machine in a restaurant, and I went nuts, challenging my husband to round after round until I had blisters).

So this year – after reading and observing me write the Wasa blog, and noticing my developing interest in cooking – he gave me an herb garden. Well, sort of. We don’t have real garden space in our city place, so he gave me a kit that you can assemble right on your countertop.

Mint.
Basil.
Dill.
Cilantro.
Thyme.
Parsley.
Chives.

My mom and I put together this afternoon.

We snapped a light onto the “garden” and popped in the seed pods.

“Can it really be this easy?” I said.

It was.

We added some water, feed it some nutrients, and left it to grow.

It takes about five weeks until the herbs will be ready for harvesting.

First recipe? I’m thinking a garden herb omelet.

Yoga Class in the Car

On my way to yoga class, I’m not sure which way to go. The road splits, and my instinct says left but Mapquest says right. I ignore my gut and follow the computer’s instructions.

Oops.

Turing around in the greater Washington DC area is nearly impossible. One road leads to a twisted mass of other roads and within 10 minutes I’ve crossed three borders, hitting Maryland, Washington DC, and Virginia. There are cars everywhere. Jammed along the freeway. Weaving in front of me as they merge. And my mind races with them.

In my head I’m caught up in the emotional turmoil of living in a new city. I want to move back to our original home in California where I know the streets like the back of my hand and can walk to yoga class. The clock is inching forward. By the time I figure out where I am it’s too late. I’ve missed the class.

I’m waiting at a stop sign when a woman in a minivan bumps the rear of my car.

Argh!” I yell (okay technically I yell a cuss word, but this is a G-rated blog).

As I pull over into a parking lot my instinct says stop and breathe. This time I listen. Just because I’m not in yoga class doesn’t mean I can’t practice yoga. I have my body, mind, and soul right here in the car with me — I don’t need a mat, a blanket, or the wood floor of a studio.

In inhale deeply and lengthen my spine. I meditate on my breath and seek inner stillness. By the time I step out of the car I feel a hundred times better. The woman in the minivan is apologetic and wants to make sure I’m okay and my car’s okay.

There is only a small scrape on the back bumper.

“Don’t worry about it,” I say. “This car is 10 years old.”

We wave goodbye to each other and drive our separate ways. On the way home I continue to practice my breathing. My blue mat is still rolled up on the passenger’s seat. And the roads are still packed with cars and noisy construction and confusing twisting turns. But inside, I’m slowly finding silence.

Halloween

I’m debating what to do about Halloween.

I loved dressing up and collecting candy as a kid. But as an adult – and someone with a growing awareness of our country’s health crisis – I don’t want to encourage the consumption of sugar, high fructose corn syrup, artificial flavorings…you get the idea.

I could hand out boxes of raisins, but I hated that as a child.

I could hand out toothbrushes, but again, that’s no fun.

I could bake something – treats using crispy brown rice cereal and natural peanut butter – but I know homemade goods would get thrown out by vigilant parents.

I have a friend who has her kids put their loot in a pile before bed. During the night the Great Pumpkin comes and Poof! their candy is turned into little games and trinkets from the dollar store. I also know a dentist who gives money in exchange for the kids who turn in their candy.

Hmm.

I was reading a recent issue of Body & Soul magazine and saw a small article on fair trade. Most chocolate, the article said, is exported from the Ivory Coast where kids aren’t going to school because they’re working on cocoa farms to help with family income. Buying fair trade products ensures that the money goes directly to the farmers and their communities instead of all the middlemen. And it just so happens that you can buy individually wrapped pieces of fair trade dark chocolate (according to some studies, dark chocolate does have a few health benefits).

Click here for a link to the article and a list of the companies.

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