Tag Archives: Job

Ohlone College COUNSELOR FOR DEAF/HARD OF HEARING Full-Time Tenure-Track Counseling Faculty Position – Start Fall 2013 APPLICATION DEADLINE: April 19, 2013 at 5:00 PM Starting Salary Range: $61,274 to $93,225 IDEAL CANDIDATE Ohlone College seeks to employ counseling faculty who have a passion for counseling and a strong commitment to the missions and ideals of […]

The Biology Department at Gallaudet University is accepting applications for summer internships for deaf or hard of hearing science undergraduate students.  They will continue to accept applications until they have chosen their students for internships.  Six internships are available – three for a genetics project, and three for an ecology project.  The summer internships start on […]

Creating Opportunities for Deaf Employment Innovation Diversity Empowerment Access (CODE-IDEA) offers videos in ASL and captions for employers who want to hire deaf and hard of hearing people and for job seekers.  They are also offering an I-Pad for their Deaf@work contest.  Photographs need to be submitted by February 7, 2013 to qualify for this contest. […]

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: INTERPRETER TRAINER/ OUTREACH SPECIALIST   ORGANIZATION: Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center (DHHARC) is a statewide advocacy, resource, telecommunications distribution, and direct service center offering services throughout Nevada.  DHHARC has two offices: one in Reno/Sparks and one in Las Vegas. GENERAL INFORMATION: Type of appointment: Full time, non-exempt employee Location: Position […]

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Executive Director ORGANIZATION: The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center (DHHARC) is a NEVADA statewide advocacy, resource, telecommunications distribution, and direct service center.  DHHARC has offices in Reno/Sparks and Las Vegas. GENERAL INFORMATION: Type of appointment: Full-Time/at-will Location: Reno/Sparks and Las Vegas Posting […]

ASADV ED Position Announcement

Gallaudet University President Dr. Alan Hurwitz, put Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) Dr. Angela McCaskill on administrative leave on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 because she signed a petition regarding same-sex marriage in Maryland.  Yesterday, Dr. McCaskill said she wanted her old job back.  In the news yesterday, Dr. Hurwitz said he wanted Dr. McCaskill to come back to […]

The California School for the Deaf at Riverside is taking action to help Deaf people get jobs.  All of their high school students are required to take vocational education, regardless of their future plans.  They are also required to do an internship for one summer.  They are still required to take academic classes along with […]

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Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Executive Director ORGANIZATION: The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center (DHHARC) is a NEVADA statewide advocacy, resource, telecommunications distribution, and direct service center.  DHHARC has offices in Reno/Sparks and Las Vegas. GENERAL INFORMATION: Type of appointment: Full-Time/at-will Location: Reno/Sparks and Las Vegas Compensation: […]

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

A Time to Feast

I’m hanging out with my parents when my dad sees me frantically rubbing my thumbs against the palms of my hands.

“Are you nervous?” he asks.

“Yeah,” I say.

He wants to know why. How to explain?

My parents have been visiting the past few days. I haven’t seen them in over six months. It’s the longest period of time we’ve ever been apart (even when I lived in Europe after college I saw them at least every four months). The past few days have been one big party. We’ve eaten red meat and fried foods. We’ve had Grasshoppers (ice cream and alcohol) and cookies. I think I munched on a vegetable in there somewhere – yes, I steamed spinach one night – but other than that, I can’t say I’ve been practicing “mindful eating” since Saturday. And my home yoga regime? Completely cut off once my parents arrived (although my mom saw my mat, which was rolled out on the floor, and she practiced sun salutations).

“I’m not sure what to blog about for Wasa this week,” I finally say to my dad.

“Well, let’s think,” he says.

“I’m supposed to blog about yoga and mindful eating, but I’m not inspired given my eating habits and lack of yoga practice,” I explain.

My dad is silent for awhile. “You could talk about how yoga is important for old people like me,” he finally says. “As people age, they are at an increased risk of falling. So write in your blog that yoga is important for balance and to do yoga with a Wasa cracker.”

“Uh, okay. Thanks,” I say.

“Just trying to help,” he says.

My mom chimes in too. “Oh, I know,” she says. “Blog about the fact that we bought a juicer.”

It’s true. My parents read the Wasa blog and were inspired to buy a juicer.

“Last week we made peach juice with vodka,” my mom says. “It was delicious!” She pauses. “Am I missing the point?”

Well, I do wish they would make vegetable juice instead, but maybe I’m the one who is missing the point. As I drop them off at the airport, I know what I’m going to blog about: A Time to Feast. This week we’ve hit up good restaurants and had fun cooking in too. We played cards and watched baseball and talked, all over scones for breakfast and steaks for dinner. It was a reunion. A celebration.  A time to enjoy life. Not that we couldn’t have done that over Brussels sprouts and brown rice, but eating well most of the time makes it easier to allow the exceptions. Not to mention, those “exceptions” are much appreciated.

Mr. Forgetful

Remember Mr. Men and Little Miss?

I was a child of the 70s and loved those characters. I think Mr. Funny was my favorite, but last Sunday I was reminded of Mr. Forgetful.

It was mid-morning, and my husband and I were exiting a crowded parking lot. The pavement was packed, and cars were bumper to bumper as everyone tried to work their way out onto the main road. A couple policemen were directing traffic and one waved us on. Two seconds later a second policeman held up his hand indicating we should stop. Confusion ensued as my husband rolled forward then hit his breaks as he tried to follow the directions. Cars honked. A red truck squealed his tires and raced around us, cutting us off and running over a couple of orange cones.

Guess where we were leaving?

Church.

We had just finished listening to a sermon about treating others kindly.

How quickly we forget (and I’m not just talking about the guy in the red truck…I found myself feeling annoyed with the traffic too!).

At times I’ve noticed Mr. Forgetful making an appearance in yoga class. Here’s what happens: we spend 90 minutes stretching and meditating and bowing and OMing, but as soon as class ends we’re all shoving our blankets into the shelf (each one folded in different ways), tossing our blocks in a disorganized fashioned into a bin, and then racing out the door as we reach in front of others to grab our flip-flops.

I hate to admit that I’ve been guilty of this before. But I guess I’ll be Little Miss Confession today. After one of my yoga teachers suggested people should put their props away more mindfully, I really began to pay attention. Blankets should be folded and stacked the same way to prevent the pile from tumbling. Blocks should be stacked to maximize space. Straps should be hung without tangles.

And it’s really that simple.Š

Honeymoon Phase

The work day was coming to an end. I was at my home office working on an article, and any moment I expected to hear my husband put his key in the lock and walk through the front door.

I adore this time of day.

I used to dread it, but I’m in a honeymoon phase. Dinnertime is almost here and I’m so in love with cooking.

Oh, sure, I’m thrilled to see my husband too. I enjoy hugging him and kissing him and sitting down together to talk about our days. But not that long ago, early evenings felt a little burdensome. Inevitably one of us would look at each other and ask: “So what are we going to do for dinner?”

Ugh! What a dilemma. We were usually at a loss because our cupboards were bare and besides, we were sick of the two recipes that we rotated through night after night after night after night.

Ever since we committed to making fresh, wholesome meals from scratch (or mostly scratch), our evenings have changed drastically. Our kitchen, for the first time ever, is abundant. We have fresh fruits and muffins, ingredients for homemade pizza, and spinach lasagna ready to reheat. We have a refrigerator full of red lettuce, apples, cherries, and tomatoes. Also we have a huge bowl of salsa because I’ve been on a salsa kick. (Basically, for the salsa I use the recipe from this book, combining corn, tomato, onion, pepper, carrots, black beans, parsley, garlic powder, and paprika. Then I add a little lemon juice, raw honey, and Dijon mustard for the dressing. I use it on everything – on top of mixed greens for a nice salad, as a topping to a veggie sandwich, on top of brown rice, as a dip for baked tortilla chips, etc.).

This week I’m experimenting with a variety of homemade salad dressings. When it comes to salad dressing though, my forever favorite is simply balsamic vinegar on top of baby spinach. I usually throw in pine nuts, sun dried tomatoes, goat cheese, and sautéed shitake mushrooms. The original recipe (which I copied from a menu in a restaurant whose name is slipping my mind) also called for bow tie pasta (I use tri-colored).

Tonight for dinner we’re having taco salad, and I’m going to mash up some avocados to make guacamole as a veggie dip. I’m excited about this.

People! How come no one ever told me cooking can be so fun?

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