Tag Archives: hard of hearing

Harrisburg offers to take deaf students

// Associated Press – April 30, 2010 8:55 AM ET HARRISBURG, S.D. (AP) – The Harrisburg School District is offering to take the five remaining students at the South Dakota School for the Deaf. The Board of Regents, which oversees the Siou To see the rest of article  click on http://www.kcautv.com/Global/story.asp?S=12403594

Two Rochester School for the Deaf students won first-place

Democrat and Chronicle Rochester, NY Two Rochester School for the Deaf students won first-place in their team division of the 2010 Rochester Institute of Technology National Science Fair for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Middle and High School Students, held March 26-27on the RIT campus. Eighth-grader Allison Higgins of Leicester and seventh-grader Madilyn Smith of [...]

Baseball team featured in ‘USA Today’; attends White House ceremony with New York Yankees

President Barack Obama greets Baseball Head Coach Curtis Pride at the White House. Photo by Sam Atkinson. Members of the baseball team and Athletics staff stand outside the White House’s East Room during their visit. Photo by Sam Atkinson. In less than 24 hours, the Gallaudet baseball team met President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe [...]

Department of Public Welfare Discriminates Against Deaf Pennsylvanians with Intellectual Disabilities

PHILADELPHIA, April 29 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Disability Rights Network of Pennsylvania filed a class action lawsuit in U.S. District Court today against the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare (DPW) alleging multiple violations of federal law in how DPW provides services to deaf persons with intellectual disabilities. “Imagine living in a home where you cannot communicate with [...]

Spokane father won’t force deaf daughter to wear required cochlear implants

The News Tribune Alison Boggs; The Spokesman-Review Published: 04/29/1012:36 pm A deaf Washington man faces a contempt charge in Kootenai County 1st District Court for refusing to force his deaf daughter to wear cochlear implants in a case that has attracted national attention. Emma McLaughlin-Orton was born to Jennifer Orton Miller and Shaun McLaughlin in [...]

By DON NORFLEET The Fulton Sun The mother of a student at the Missouri School for the Deaf in Fulton is one of 13 Missourians who have joined the Missouri Association for the Deaf in a lawsuit against the state of Missouri claiming about 1,100 deaf Missourians who need mental health services are not receiving [...]

Kyle Richtig for SooNews.ca Thursday, April 29, 2010, 12:59PM Job searching is difficult under any circumstances. Add in restrictions, assistive devices and specific needs, and the search can get even tighter. It is important for those with restrictions, different abilities and needs to tailor their job searches to not only what they want to do, [...]

Skinny Female Dog

Have you read the book Skinny Female Dog yet? (That’s not the real title, but I don’t like to cuss on blogs.) I laughed my way through it with advice like “All carbs are not created equal. There are two types: simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates suck and are as nutritionally beneficial as toilet paper.” The authors’ big tip throughout the book was to “use your head” when you make choices about eating. They are proponents of no meat and no dairy. I’m of the mindset that I need a little of those food groups for a well-balanced diet (my head says there’s something not quite right about a replacing meat and dairy with soymilk, soy “cheese,” soy “meat,” etc. – BUT that’s just me. The book has some great info in there and is worth the read.)

Moving on, the point I’m trying to make is that I visited the authors’ website the other day. Watch their Video Interview. I loved it. It took one of the author’s seven years to transform her eating habits. The other one – ten years. Their message is so clear and true: the goal is to eat well and do the best you can, but no one is perfect. It’s takes time to change your diet. Taste buds need to be retrained. Moving towards healthier foods is a progression. You give up what you can and don’t beat yourself up when you eat something less than ideal.  Š

Dance of the Warrior

As few weeks ago, we had a substitute teacher in yoga class. He had us do a series of poses where we moved from one warrior position to another to another then back to the first one. And so on.

The Dance of the Warrior, he called it.

The dictionary defines warrior as “one who is engaged in or experienced in battle.”

The battle in yoga, I suppose, is with the anxious, unstable, and not-so-Zen side of myself.

Can I learn to stay centered in the face of fear?
Can I find my balance when life seems to be throwing me in loops?
Can I take action with insight and compassion?

In other words, can I find the way of the peaceful warrior?

As I moved through the series, my muscles trembled, my body wobbled, and my breath labored. At least, part of the time it was like that. At other times, I was calm(er) and stead(ier) and moving in rhythm. Slowly, I’m learning the dance.

Downhill

I carefully set out my outfit.

Organized my purse.

Planned breakfast.

Gathered the leash to walk the dog.

And then, finally, set my alarm clock.

As a writer, I’ve been working out of the home for a couple years, but Monday morning I was due in a company’s corporate offices for a six-week, on-site editorial gig. I’m not a morning person at all, so the night before, I needed to prepare.

Food-wise, the first day went okay. I ate fruit and oatmeal for breakfast, had a tuna sandwich in the office’s cafeteria for lunch, and, back home, had enough energy left over to cook a healthy vegetable-based dinner. That was Day 1. The rest of week I watched myself slide downhill. (I’d forgotten how corporate jobs suck every second of your time away – making it hard to prepare fresh meals. Oh, and the sugar. Being Valentine’s week, the chocolate overload running through that office – Oy! I ate too much of it.) By Friday, my fridge was bare (no breakfast fruit), I was still eating tuna for lunch (hello – mercury overload?), and dinner was refined pasta at a restaurant.

My throat felt a little . . . sore. OMG, was I getting a cold? Dang it. I didn’t have a single cold in 2007, and I suspect it was because my immune system was stronger due to better eating habits.

“I haven’t eaten one vegetable today,” I said to Ron Friday night. (I’m not counting a wilted piece of lettuce and green tomato slice on my tuna sandwich as real vegetables).

Saturday morning, as my sinuses clogged and my throat felt worse, I rushed my husband out the door with a grocery list. I juiced vegetables and drank the concoction down in a few gulps. I ate an orange. For lunch, I made a homemade bean soup. I ate another orange. For dinner I made a veggie omelet.

Too late. I officially had a cold. I knew the best thing I could do for myself was rest. I cancelled all weekend plans, and I slept and drank hot tea. In bed Sunday night, I figured I’d be calling in sick the next day. But miraculously, I woke up cured. Again, I blame the vegetables for the quick recovery.

This week I’m doing better (not great, but better) managing the “office” life. Our home fridge is stocked with healthy foods to choose from in the morning, I’m packing my lunch (dark leafy green salad with cranberries, walnuts, and a little goat cheese), and dinner is mapped out (today we’re having a brown rice risotto with asparagus and a mixed greens salad).

I’ll be sure to toast to good health.

Egg Rough-Muffin

When one of my writing colleagues asked me if I had any tips for driving across the country (my husband and I made the trek 18 months ago), I told her to Google all the Whole Foods across the nation and make a point to stop at a few for decent food. Also, I suggested she keep a cooler of healthy, cleansing snacks in the car.

My husband and I didn’t do either of those things, and I was blown away by our limited meal options during our trip. Fast food, fast food, or fast food anyone?

I admit I do have a taste for a sausage mc-muffin with egg from time to time, and the car ride gave me ample opportunity to indulge. But I knew it wasn’t good for my health. The other day I had a craving, and I decided to make a wholesome, at-home version of my favorite fast food breakfast.

I toasted an organic wheat English muffin (search the health food stores for brands that don’t include sugar, high fructose corn syrup, or “enriched” flour). Then I poached an egg (break and egg into a measuring cup and slide it into simmering water to cook for 7 minutes). I placed the egg on the toasted muffin, piled on a thick slice of tomato (instead of a sausage patty), and topped it off with a tad bit of grated cheese. Finally, I broiled the “sandwich” for a few more minutes. It was quick, easy, and so good that I decided to serve it for dinner the next night. Yum.

Now I’ve just gotta figure out how to make a healthy version of a big mac. Š

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