Tag Archives: graduate school

Gallaudet University plans to start a Masters in Public Administration (MPA) program in Fall 2012.  The classes would be provided in ASL and English.  That way, they plan to make the classes accessible to Deaf and hard-of-hearing students.   Many managerial jobs require a graduate degree, and it would help Deaf and hard-of-hearing people to get managerial jobs.

WASA Turkey Jack Sandwich

Ingredients

1 slice Wasa Multi Grain Crispbread
1 slice of turkey breast
1 slice pepper jack cheese
1 fresh basil leaf

Directions

Layer each ingredient on the Wasa to create an open-faced sandwich. Break/cut into thirds.

Enjoy!

Getting Your Tadalafil Online is Brilliant and Convenient

In the past, prior to the advent of the internet and e-commerce, people usually rely on pharmacies and drugstores to provide them with the medications they need.  Although this has always been the norm, the problem is that some retail outlets do not have, cater, or carry out certain branding or medications simply because they are not in partnership with the drug label or they do not stock such because they do not sell much and just occupy storage space.  For this reason, if you are looking for a certain drug that is not available in your area, either you go look around for it in neighboring cities that may have them, or simply settle for the nearest alternative to the drug but may not even come close in terms of effectiveness to what you are looking for.

Fortunately for all of us, we now live in an age where online commerce is abundant and internet connectivity is easily available.  This means if you are looking for a certain product or a particular type of medication, all you have to do is go online, open your favorite web browser, then, using your favorite search engine, enter your search query like “buy tadalafil online.”  This search will give you thousands of results, then it is up to you to look for the shop you would want to buy tadalafil online. Read more…

Big on Arms

We are in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II) and the teacher is walking us through the pose nice and slow. She has us begin in Tadasana (Mountain pose) and then tells us to touch our fingertips together in front of our chest. As we jump our legs apart, our arms open up too (so they are parallel to the ground).

Next, the real instruction begins. She focuses on our feet, making sure they are spaced far enough apart and turned in the proper direction. She reminds us that our back heel should be aligned with our front heel.

She pauses as we breathe.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

She moves onto our legs. She makes sure that our right knee is bent so that it’s directly over the right ankle. We need to press our thigh back so we can see our second toe. She keeps us focused on our lower body, giving us directions on our tailbone, butt, and – again – our thighs. She mentions that second toe again.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

You can practically hear the thoughts of every student in the studio: My arms are tired. My arms are so tired! When will this pose be over so we can put our arms down? Are anyone else’s arms tired? Or am I just a wimp? How much longer do we have to hold our arms up?

Finally, the teacher says, “I know your arms are tired.”

Her acknowledgement is a relief even though she encourages us to keep those arms lifted. “Stretch them out even further, reeeaaaaching for the walls,” she says.

She moves onto our shoulder blades – are they scrunched up by our neck? Release them.

Lengthen our torsos.

Broaden our chests.

She knows exactly what we’re doing – allowing our minds to be consumed with thoughts about our arms.

“Your brain starts to panic first,” she says. “Your body is strong and your arms can handle this.”

That’s the extra motivation we need for the last few breaths until she finally has us step our feet back together and place our hands on our hips.

I’m working out in LA for a couple weeks – my old hometown – and it’s great to be back in my favorite teacher’s class. Now that I’m here, I remember she was always big on arms.

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

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