Tag Archives: Gallaudet

Gallaudet University has planned activities in February and March to honor the 25th anniversary of its Deaf President Now (DPN) movement.  As a result of DPN, Gallaudet got its first deaf president.  

The Biology Department at Gallaudet University is accepting applications for summer internships for deaf or hard of hearing science undergraduate students.  They will continue to accept applications until they have chosen their students for internships.  Six internships are available – three for a genetics project, and three for an ecology project.  The summer internships start on […]

Dr. Victor Henry Galloway, who was the first Deaf superintendent of the Texas School for the Deaf during the 1980′s, was also the first Deaf superintendent of the Scranton State School for the Deaf in Pennsylvania from 1979 – 1981.  He died on January 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  He was survived by his wife, Mrs. […]

Gallaudet University’s women’s basketball team will play against Claremont-Mudd-Scripps College at California School for the Deaf, Fremont on January 2, 2012.  The game will start at 7:00 p.m.  Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for students and senior citizens, and free for young children up through the age of four.  

Gallaudet University President Dr. Alan Hurwitz, put Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) Dr. Angela McCaskill on administrative leave on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 because she signed a petition regarding same-sex marriage in Maryland.  Yesterday, Dr. McCaskill said she wanted her old job back.  In the news yesterday, Dr. Hurwitz said he wanted Dr. McCaskill to come back to […]

Obit: Former Deaf School Teacher

Damaris Jean (Thompson) Copperud died unexpectedly on July 19, 2012 at her home in Oakland. She was born in Minnesota, and she received her master’s degree from Gallaudet in Washington, D.C.  She taught at the California School for the Deaf (Berkeley and Fremont) for 40 years.  After she retired in 1986, she pursued her hobbies, […]

Gallaudet University plans to start a Masters in Public Administration (MPA) program in Fall 2012.  The classes would be provided in ASL and English.  That way, they plan to make the classes accessible to Deaf and hard-of-hearing students.   Many managerial jobs require a graduate degree, and it would help Deaf and hard-of-hearing people to get managerial jobs.

Gallaudet University’s Identity Struggle Continues

Tim Riker The Cutting Edge December 6th 2010 After two protests which rocked Gallaudet University, positive changes are being made but Gallaudet University still does not fully embrace Deaf culture and respect American Sign Language. The selection of Catherine Murphy as the Director of Public Relations at Gallaudet University recently is another symptom of the […]

The Washington Post By Daniel de Vise  |  September 7, 2010; 10:57 AM ET An article in the Gallaudet University student newspaper, the Buff and Blue, questions whether campus police were too slow in responding to a bicycle crash that killed a campus worker.

Job: Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Freedom

I was “birthed” into the world of yoga through the Iyengar style where precision and alignment are emphasized. My teacher would adjust our poses starting from our pinky toe (literally – she’d have us lift it up and try to spread it away from our other toes) all the way to the tops of our heads (which, she would tell us, should be lifting toward the ceiling, as if a string was attached to our scalp and someone was pulling).

I’m one of those follow the rules, read the directions, life is in the details type of girls, so I ate Iyengar yoga up. The fact that my hamstrings are tight, my shoulders are scrunched, and my hips are narrow make Iyengar a fitting practice because I benefit so greatly from the blocks and straps and blankets that are generously encouraged in that style of practice to help with proper positioning.

From time to time I’ve experimented with other yoga styles – this article describes various kinds – and recently I found myself in a session where the teacher was leading a flow with pretty much no regard to form whatsoever.

At first I was distraught.

“Beautiful!” the yoga teacher said when I moved into Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II).

“Oh, yeah, right,” I thought to myself.

In an Iyengar class, the instructor is always adjusting my Warrior II pose. I’m like a toy where you push one section in and another section pops out. If she moves my left thigh, my right knee tweaks to a different place. If she tilts my pelvis, my arms plummet. If she tells me where to fix my gaze – whoops – there goes my thigh again.

Anyway, I realized pretty quickly that I didn’t want to spend the entire practice mentally upset that this yoga teacher wasn’t going to focus on form. Other than calling out the pose, she was giving no instructions, and deep inside I knew that was okay. Because yoga really isn’t about form. Not at its core. It’s about being in a present state of mind. Finding a place where I’m not worrying about the future or obsessing over the past, even if those thoughts relate to yoga itself. As I continued the flow, I let go of the details and the precision and simply enjoyed the movement.

I felt warm and flexible and free.

Retraining Taste Buds

The carrots I hold in my hand are fresh from a local garden. They’re dirty and have wild bushy green tops. I wash and peel the carrots then pick up the knife. I have a long way to go until I can maneuver this utensil like those chefs on the Food Network, but I’m getting better. Faster.

I cut the carrots, chop the onion, dice the celery, slice the mushrooms and throw everything into a skillet with water. While the veggies are steam sautéing I boil tri-colored pasta in a medium pot and steam spinach in a small one. I add tomatoes and tomato sauce to the skillet. When the pasta and spinach are ready I add those too, along with garlic and oregano.

My husband, Ron, wanders in the kitchen.

“What’s for dinner?” he asks.

“Italian Skillet Casserole,” I say.

He leans over my shoulder and investigates the simmering dish on the stovetop.

“Almost all veggies,” I point out.

Cooking healthier foods has been challenging in certain ways, but one thing I completely forgot about when I started this new path is that my husband can’t stand vegetables. He’ll eat certain items (broccoli or beans or salad) because he knows they’re good for him, but he would prefer them as a side dish, not the main dish.

But it just so happens that his company is having a Vegetable Challenge this summer.

So perfect timing.

I scoop out the meal into two bowls, light some candles, and sit down.

It’s delicious, and I look at Ron to see what he thinks. He’s pushing a piece of onion, a hunk of tomato, and a mushroom slice to the side. “I can eat them when they’re small, but these big pieces…” he shakes his head.

“You need to retrain your taste buds,” I suggest softly.

He’s a good sport so he takes a huge spoonful, onion chunks and all, and gives it a go. He likes it. This truly is one of the tastier dishes I’ve made, and when I’m done I push my bowl aside and lean back in the chair.

“Hey, what’s that?” Ron says, peering into my bowl.

“Nothing,” I say.

“Uh-huh,” Ron nods, smirking.

Okay, okay. So I really do consider myself a vegetable lover, but I’ve always struggled with cooked carrots. There is small pile of them left. I guess we both have some retraining to work through.

Healthier Options

My trip to LA is winding to a close. I’d love to post a couple of healthy new recipes I tried this week, but I haven’t been cooking (unless you consider slicing apple and dipping it in natural peanut butter cooking). Instead, I’ve been eating out more than I intended. But I guess I have re-learned one lesson on this road trip: it never hurts to ask. The other day I was ordering an Ahi tuna burger from one of my favorite spots – a roadside seafood shack. I was sure they didn’t have wheat buns – I looked everywhere for the small print in the menu indicating customers had that choice and couldn’t find it. But when I asked, turns out they could serve their burgers on wheat. And the breakfast place this morning – though the menu doesn’t specify, you can request fruit on the side instead of home fries. Of course options like that aren’t always available. The Chinese place I stopped by the other night didn’t have brown rice as an option – only white. But I’m going to keep asking, cuz you just never know.

The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

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