Tag Archives: discrimination

The topic of this conference is “Deaf Learners – the past, the present, What about our FUTURE?”  ’Raising Deaf potential through education!’  The conference is supported by the Office of Disability Issues, and the conference will be held at the University of Westminster.  Early bird tickets are offered until April 12, 2013.  

An independent federal agency, The National Council on Disability (NCD), has a deaf man as their new Chairperson.  Jeff Rosen, a third-generation deaf person involved with the disability movement,  has been the General Counsel for ZVRS.  He is an attorney who has been involved with other deaf and disability organizations.  

Gallaudet University has planned activities in February and March to honor the 25th anniversary of its Deaf President Now (DPN) movement.  As a result of DPN, Gallaudet got its first deaf president.  

Michael Argenyi, a medical student at Creighton University in Omaha,  has filed a lawsuit against the school for not providing transcribers and interpreters.  Argenyi took out more than $110,000 in loans to pay for transcribers and interpreters during his first two years of medical school.  Then he left during the third year of medical school […]

Proposed FCC Action Threatens Future VRS Services

The Greater Los Angeles Agency on Deafness has asked people to “Save My VRS.”  Sorenson initiated the “Save My VRS” campaign in response to proposed regulations from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).  The FCC has proposed to replace Video Relay Service (VRS) with Smart TV’s and IPADs, and those are not designed for deaf and hard of hearing […]

A deaf man in California tried to communicate with AccountNow via e-mail.  He had recently become deaf due to a stroke.  The company insisted on communicating with him via telephone, and he was unable to use the phone.  Richard Halaviais, who had difficulty with paying his medical bills due to not being able to get […]

Doctor to Pay Patient Because He Did Not Provide Interpreter

Dr. David Bullek of New Jersey settled a complaint from a deaf patient who made an appointment to see him in 2006.  The state Civil Rights Division said he also agreed to attend training to learn about reasonable accommodation for patients with disabilities.  

Deaf and developmentally disabled people in Georgia were not given access to services in Georgia.  Judge Richard W. Story of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia ruled in favor of Deaf Georgians who qualify for mental health and developmental disability services. Judge Story said Georgia needs more mental health professionals with fluent […]

According to a lawsuit against some state agencies, Deaf and hard-of-hearing state employees have had lack of access and have faced discrimination.  The lawsuit against state agencies was filed last Friday by Joshua Konecky in the San Francisco Superior Court.  Mr. Konecky is seeking other state employees who want to get involved with this class action lawsuit.

Action Alert: Say No to Legalized Discrimination at Movie Theaters (NAD)

(DEAFTIMES: Check this out from NAD. Re: Possible Discrimination at Movies with Captioning) http://www.nad.org/news/2011/1/action-alert-say-no-legalized-discrimination-movie-theaters

Halloween

I’m debating what to do about Halloween.

I loved dressing up and collecting candy as a kid. But as an adult – and someone with a growing awareness of our country’s health crisis – I don’t want to encourage the consumption of sugar, high fructose corn syrup, artificial flavorings…you get the idea.

I could hand out boxes of raisins, but I hated that as a child.

I could hand out toothbrushes, but again, that’s no fun.

I could bake something – treats using crispy brown rice cereal and natural peanut butter – but I know homemade goods would get thrown out by vigilant parents.

I have a friend who has her kids put their loot in a pile before bed. During the night the Great Pumpkin comes and Poof! their candy is turned into little games and trinkets from the dollar store. I also know a dentist who gives money in exchange for the kids who turn in their candy.

Hmm.

I was reading a recent issue of Body & Soul magazine and saw a small article on fair trade. Most chocolate, the article said, is exported from the Ivory Coast where kids aren’t going to school because they’re working on cocoa farms to help with family income. Buying fair trade products ensures that the money goes directly to the farmers and their communities instead of all the middlemen. And it just so happens that you can buy individually wrapped pieces of fair trade dark chocolate (according to some studies, dark chocolate does have a few health benefits).

Click here for a link to the article and a list of the companies.

Healing Waters

I sink into the water.

Outside, at the hot springs, the air is cool and river still. It smells like sulfur, but after a few minutes I don’t notice. I’m simply lost in the “healing waters.” That’s what they are called because supposedly the minerals in the hot springs help with a number of ailments. Personally, I enjoy the way the heat releases the tension in my body. I especially like soaking my feet – they cramp easily. I also like the heat around the middle of my body – a source of pain between a miscarriage, a surgery, and fertility frustrations over the past 12 months.

I lean back against the stone wall of the bath and watch.

There is a man standing under a waterfall. The water thuds against his back. What is he healing? Tight shoulders? Work stress? Or something deeper . . . the loss of a family member or friend?

In another pool there is a woman with her eyes closed. Maybe she is washing away the pain of divorce. Or abuse. Or a dog named Marley.

I don’t know. I’m just guessing. But when I start thinking about all the different types of “loss” people deal with, it’s clear we all need healing. One of the professors at the university I attended in Southern California just lost his house in the fires. One of my friends just gave birth, a joyful event . . . and a loss of personal time.

Loss of age . . . loss of a job . . . loss of a breast . . . loss of mental agility . . . loss of a city after a move . . . loss of a child who goes off to college . . . and on and on and on it goes.

I read a paragraph in a book the other day about the importance of taking time to heal. The author said that when we step back and heal ourselves we become aware of a world full of people in need. My time of retreat is coming to a close. I hope I don’t go back home and get too wrapped up in schedules and deadlines and the frustrations of city traffic. I hope I can heed the author’s advice and help heal the world in little personal ways. Š

Healthier Options

My trip to LA is winding to a close. I’d love to post a couple of healthy new recipes I tried this week, but I haven’t been cooking (unless you consider slicing apple and dipping it in natural peanut butter cooking). Instead, I’ve been eating out more than I intended. But I guess I have re-learned one lesson on this road trip: it never hurts to ask. The other day I was ordering an Ahi tuna burger from one of my favorite spots – a roadside seafood shack. I was sure they didn’t have wheat buns – I looked everywhere for the small print in the menu indicating customers had that choice and couldn’t find it. But when I asked, turns out they could serve their burgers on wheat. And the breakfast place this morning – though the menu doesn’t specify, you can request fruit on the side instead of home fries. Of course options like that aren’t always available. The Chinese place I stopped by the other night didn’t have brown rice as an option – only white. But I’m going to keep asking, cuz you just never know.

Soul Food

It’s been raining ever since I arrived in Los Angeles. Pouring, actually. The weather reminds me of the 1997-1998 El Nino. It’s all good though. I’m here at a university working on a book project and the rain is keeping me indoors where I’m squirreled away in the library.

The last time I was out here to “work” I got a wee bit distracted and spent my days catching up with friends, visiting my old haunts, eating at my favorite places, etc. This time I’m being good.

“I picture you in a dark, dusty room all alone as you sort through archives,” my husband said to me on the phone the other day. Well, sort-of. I take the documents out of the dark, dusty room to a bigger, lighter conference room. And that’s pretty much where I’ve been the whole time – the exact same spot I was ten years ago as a grad student, typing notes on my laptop (do you ever have the feeling that you’re making no progress in life whatsoever? Anyhoo…)

Last Friday the weather channel called for rain Saturday and Sunday, so I planned to push through the weekend and continue working. But when I woke up Saturday morning, I felt sunlight on my face. I jumped up and ran to the window . . . sure enough it was a bright, shiny morning. The Pacific Ocean sparkled. I had to enjoy the sun while it lasted.

I was starving, so I gobbled down a veggie sandwich (tomato, California avocado, cucumber and sprouts on toasted whole wheat). Then I dashed to the bike path, buckled my rollerblades and – Zoom! – I was off. I bladed all the way to the end of the path, turned around and bladed back, and then turned around once again. I was like the Energizer Bunny . . . I kept going and going and going (‘cept for the part where I rounded a curve way too fast and hit an unexpected pile of sand).

It was the best. The veggie sandwich was certainly a tasty beginning to the day. But I tell ya, its sunshine that feeds my soul.

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