Tag Archives: deaf-blind

The Deaf Seniors of America will have their Conference and activities prior to the Conference in Baltimore from August 21st through August 27th this year.   If you pay for combo tickets before July 31st, you can save money.  

A totally deaf dog who is almost completely blind had been going to a dog park in Santa Maria.  The park ranger at Waller Park said he was too big.  His owner, Marty Niles, said he can’t be around large, aggressive dogs.   

The Blind Children’s Learning Center is in Santa Ana in Orange County.  They provide services to blind and deaf-blind children.  Their walk on Saturday, May 11, 2013 is a fund-raiser for that learning center.  

Summer Institute at CSUN

California State University, Northridge will hold its 6th Summer Institute from June 17-21 and June 24-28, 2013.  It will be sponsored by the National Institute on Deafness (NCOD).  Early bird rates are offered between now and May 17, 2013, and they are offering 40 hours of courses for $400.00.  They will have classes such as […]

Deaf Spring Break is coming to Hotel Hunting Beach at Huntington Beach on Thursday, March 28, 2013. The California School for the Deaf in Riverside (CSDR) is having their Happy Days Reunion Car Show on Saturday, March 30, 2013.  Entrance fees are $10.00 a person.  They will have a pancake breakfast, vendors, music, and games. […]

The National Deaf-Blind Equipment Program (NDBEDP) provides Deaf-Blind people with communication technology.  The I Can Connect website has information on how the program works.  It also has a list of providers in different states.   The program promoted by I Can Connect provides training and telecommunication assistance for Deaf-Blind people who meet federal eligibility guidelines.

A building on Forbes Avenue in Pittsburgh will be converted into an apartment building for low-income people with hearing loss and vision impairments.  The Famous Biscuit Co. building  is being converted into apartments with government help.  The federal and state governments are providing low-income housing tax credits, and a low-interest loan for $925,000 came from the […]

Communication for Deaf-Blind

The University of Arts Berlin developed a prototype Lorm glove to increase communication access for Deaf-blind people.   A mobile Lorm glove allows Deaf-blind people to transmit text messages and to receive them. A speaker wearing a Mobile Lorm Glove can stroke the letters into the glove, and the letters are transmitted into text on the […]

Rally supports Valley View residence for the deaf and deaf-blind

Bob Katz told a crowd about his sister’s experience of being isolated at a rehab facility at a rally to support the Valley View residence for the deaf and deaf-blind elderly in Middletown Township.  When the staff and residents can communicate in the same language, Katz said, it makes all the difference. The group gathered […]

The Office of Deaf Access has free information available for the general public.  They have sign language communication brochures along with the Directory of Resources.  This directory has information for Deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind and late deafened.  That information may also be valuable for parents, advocates, and service providers.  Information is provided for programs and […]

Pain Relief with Tramadol 50mg

Every human feels pain during his lifetime. There are different types of pain but they all can be alleviated. A lot of pain medications are available on the market now and it may be hard to choose among all this diversity. If you experience pain and it’s difficult for you to choose a drug, we advise you to try Tramadol. Tramadol is a medication used to ease intense pain. It is approved by the FDA which means it is a safe and effective type of medicine.

 

imagesTramadol is prescribed for people who experience violent pain. It changes the pain perception of the body. Tramadol 50 mg is the perfect solution for older people who have osteoarthritis, renal colic, or painful trauma. There are two types of Tramadol tablets: a simple pill and a long-acting tablet. Long-acting pill provides a more prolonged reduction in pain, but it may be contraindicated for some people. Consult your health care provider for more information. You should take one long-acting Tramadol pill per day with food. Simple Tramadol 50 mg pills are taken every 5 hours regardless of food.
Tramadol hcl is a pretty strong medicine, so you should be careful and follow the instructions on the prescription label. Improper use of the drug can cause different dangerous side effects. It can also be habit-forming. Contact the doctor if your mood swings. It may be the sign of the beginning of dependence.

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Healing Waters

I sink into the water.

Outside, at the hot springs, the air is cool and river still. It smells like sulfur, but after a few minutes I don’t notice. I’m simply lost in the “healing waters.” That’s what they are called because supposedly the minerals in the hot springs help with a number of ailments. Personally, I enjoy the way the heat releases the tension in my body. I especially like soaking my feet – they cramp easily. I also like the heat around the middle of my body – a source of pain between a miscarriage, a surgery, and fertility frustrations over the past 12 months.

I lean back against the stone wall of the bath and watch.

There is a man standing under a waterfall. The water thuds against his back. What is he healing? Tight shoulders? Work stress? Or something deeper . . . the loss of a family member or friend?

In another pool there is a woman with her eyes closed. Maybe she is washing away the pain of divorce. Or abuse. Or a dog named Marley.

I don’t know. I’m just guessing. But when I start thinking about all the different types of “loss” people deal with, it’s clear we all need healing. One of the professors at the university I attended in Southern California just lost his house in the fires. One of my friends just gave birth, a joyful event . . . and a loss of personal time.

Loss of age . . . loss of a job . . . loss of a breast . . . loss of mental agility . . . loss of a city after a move . . . loss of a child who goes off to college . . . and on and on and on it goes.

I read a paragraph in a book the other day about the importance of taking time to heal. The author said that when we step back and heal ourselves we become aware of a world full of people in need. My time of retreat is coming to a close. I hope I don’t go back home and get too wrapped up in schedules and deadlines and the frustrations of city traffic. I hope I can heed the author’s advice and help heal the world in little personal ways. Š

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

Broccoli

Broccoli. Used to like it as a kid. Then one day I ate it and threw-up later that night. Haven’t touched it since. We’re talking 19 years of no broccoli. That’ too bad considering it’s one of the best vegetables out there – packed with nutrients, fiber, and cancer-fighting antioxidants.

As I continue to adjust my eating habits, I am always looking for new ways to add vegetables into my diet. Broccoli is one vegetable my husband loves, so I usually steam a little bit for him and make something different for myself – spinach, green beans, whatever. But the other night I was boiling some Barilla whole grain pasta. I drained the noodles and poured some organic pasta sauce over the top.

As I was scooping out the broccoli for my husband’s plate, I decided to mix some of the florets in with the pasta and red sauce. Yum. I love broccoli again. But only this way. I’m the same way with asparagus. Can’t really stand the stuff plain (unless of course it’s picked fresh from my own garden), but I will eat it in an omelet. Go figure. Š

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