Tag Archives: COPS

Press Release – Austin, TX – 08/23/2010 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ——————— Austin, Texas. Austin Cops Bullied A 90 lb Deaf Girl Austin, Texas – August 23, 2010. A young Deaf Austin woman was arrested last June for resisting arrest when she and her girl friend were walking down an Austin sidewalk. She and her friend […]

A Place to Start

I have yoga homework.

My teacher wants me to practice Baddha Konasana (Bound Angle pose) every single day. Then she wants me to lean back into Supta Baddha Konasana (Reclining Bound Angle pose).

It’s supposed to help me relax.

The good news about Bound Angle pose is and Reclining Bound Angle pose is that I can do them anywhere – watching TV, before bed at night, as an afternoon break in my home office.

I told her how I’ve tried to establish a home practice in the past before and wound up intimidated and overwhelmed.

“Sometimes just showing up on your mat at home and pretending to practice is a practice,” she said.

Sounds like a good place to start.

Wasa with Scrambled Eggs, Tricolor Peppers and Leeks

Ingredients

½ cup red peppers cut into ½ in long strips
½ cup green peppers cut into ½ in long strips
½ cup yellow peppers, cut into ½ in long strips
¼ cup (2 ounces) pasteurized egg white product (may substitute 1 whole egg, beaten)
1 teaspoon olive oil
2 tablespoons leeks, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon fresh parsley, chopped
2 pieces WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread

Directions

Heat olive oil in a small skillet. Add vegetables and cook until desired tenderness.
Add egg to vegetables and cook through. Remove from heat and stir in parsley.
Spread on WASA Crispbread and serve.

TIP: Substitute ½ cup of any of you favorite vegetables for peppers.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

 

Calories 85
Total Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 2 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 125 mg
Total Carbohydrate 12 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 5 g
Calcium 2% of daily value

NOTE: Nutrition information shown is not applicable when whole egg is substituted for egg white product.

Secret Ingredient

Does anyone know the secret ingredient that goes into making the perfect Smoothie? I can’t figure it out. My blender and I have been bonding lately as I try out different recipes. In addition to ice and some frozen strawberries and blueberries, I try:

Smoothies with frozen banana.

Smoothies with frozen banana and whey protein powder.

Smoothies without either.

Smoothies with honey. Smoothies with Stevia. Smoothies with an egg. Smoothies with soy milk.

No matter what I do, they simply don’t taste as good as the kind I buy. It’s not that they taste bad, but after a few sips I kinda forget about them. When I find the abandoned half-empty glass later on, I feel like I’ve wasted food. One does not forget about a really good Smoothie.

At first I thought maybe it was because when I buy Smoothies they’re probably full of sugar and ice cream or something. But no, I thoroughly enjoyed the Smoothies I drank every afternoon at a yoga retreat in Mexico last February – everything that kitchen prepared was of the healthy, no-sugar variety. I fondly recall sitting under a shade tree at the beach in the afternoons (after a morning of working out) and looking forward to seeing the resort’s chef saunter over with his latest concoction. Wait a sec…the secret ingredient I’m missing? I think it might be the beach. That is, after all, the only place I really ever drink Smoothies. There’s something about the white sand and the turquoise waters and reading a good book that makes a Smoothie taste so perfectly good.

I live far, far away from the beach.

Well, shoot.Š

Mix it Up

Staying at our retreat home in the mountains of Colorado has me thinking about water. I constantly see large vehicles with oversized plastic containers strapped into their truck beds, full of water. Water is hauled all over the place. It’s dry out here.

I’ve actually become a bit paranoid about water. What is the healthiest way to drink it? Should I gulp tap water and risk consuming substances like chlorine and fluoride, not to mention whatever else the water might be picking up as it flows through the pipes? Or should I buy water in a bottle and risk consuming leeched chemicals from the plastic, not to mention hurting the environment (plastic water bottles take 1000 years to biodegrade)? And if I do opt for store bought water, what should I purchase? Spring? Distilled? Glacial?

The more I read about water, the more confusing the facts. I find this to be the case with fish too (Eat it – it’s good for you! Don’t eat it – tuna contains mercury, fish handlers get infections when capturing rockfish, etc.!)

Here’s my current theory: instead of devoting myself to one type of water (tap, spring, well) I mix it up. That way, I figure I’ll get a variety of chemicals but (hopefully) in miniscule amounts. I take the same approach with fish. I’ll eat tuna on occasion, but not too often. Same with salmon and shrimp and sole. So that’s my theory and I’m stickin’ to it.  Š

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