Tag Archives: bilingual

The Douglas Tilden 5K/10K Walk / Run for Deaf Humanity will be held in San Francisco at the Golden Gate Park on Sunday, June 2, 2013.  If you sign up for the event by May 31st, the registration is $31.00 for adults and $16.00 for teenagers under the age of 18.  If you pay at […]

Science Daily published that article on September 28, 2012.  This article summarized research regarding children and how they process language.  The first part of the article was not about Deaf children.  Some Spanish researchers in Spain researched the relationship between language and different types of perception. The second part of the article from Science Daily […]

Deaf children benefit from learning sign language and another language, according to research from LaTrobe University in Australia.  ASL can help children become bilingual.  ASL helps them develop a written and spoken language. Many doctors and audiologists discourage parents from teaching ASL to Deaf children.  This research shows Deaf children learn the written and spoken language more […]

Chilling Out with Forward Bends

I glanced at a weather map of the United States today and it’s orange, darker orange, and red all over. In other words, it’s hot.

I tend to have a high tolerance for 90 degree weather, so I revel in it, but my yoga teacher says the heat makes a lot of people irritable.

She thought we should focus on cooling poses in class today.

We worked on variations of Downward Facing Dog – using a chair, then a wall, then the regular way – and then spent some time in Child’s Pose, Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend), and Paschimottanasana (Seated Forward Bend*).

“Forward bend poses are great for settling you down when you’re feeling agitated,” the teacher said. “You may sweat while you’re in the pose, but they’re calming on the nervous system.”

I must say, it is amazing how as the class continued I felt myself grow into silence as I streeeeeetched out, my heart resting peacefully inside.

So if you find yourself snapping at people (including yourself) or not tolerating the traffic or noticing that things that you usually don’t mind are bugging you, take heart. It might simply be the heat. Try breathing a few times . . . and don’t forget to bend.

*In Seated Forward Bend, I have to sit on two blankets and lasso a strap around the balls of my feet to hang onto and pull myself forward because I can’t reach my arms to my toes. The teacher looks just like the lady in this picture when she’s in the pose, but she mentioned that 18 years ago she had to use blankets and straps too. So. By my calculations I should be able to do Seated Forward Bend without props in 15 years. I wasn’t discouraged by this. I was excited. The human body is amazing. Anyway, I’m pretty sure you’re not supposed to think about those things in yoga class, but sometimes I can’t help it!   

Pain Relief with Tramadol 50mg

Every human feels pain during his lifetime. There are different types of pain but they all can be alleviated. A lot of pain medications are available on the market now and it may be hard to choose among all this diversity. If you experience pain and it’s difficult for you to choose a drug, we advise you to try Tramadol. Tramadol is a medication used to ease intense pain. It is approved by the FDA which means it is a safe and effective type of medicine.

 

imagesTramadol is prescribed for people who experience violent pain. It changes the pain perception of the body. Tramadol 50 mg is the perfect solution for older people who have osteoarthritis, renal colic, or painful trauma. There are two types of Tramadol tablets: a simple pill and a long-acting tablet. Long-acting pill provides a more prolonged reduction in pain, but it may be contraindicated for some people. Consult your health care provider for more information. You should take one long-acting Tramadol pill per day with food. Simple Tramadol 50 mg pills are taken every 5 hours regardless of food.
Tramadol hcl is a pretty strong medicine, so you should be careful and follow the instructions on the prescription label. Improper use of the drug can cause different dangerous side effects. It can also be habit-forming. Contact the doctor if your mood swings. It may be the sign of the beginning of dependence.

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Poetry

It’s not often I’m in a yoga class where the teacher gives a reading during closing. But those rare times when that has been the case — well, I’ve adored it. I love words. Language. Poetry. Here’s the quote my yoga teacher read the other day:

Even after all this time
the sun never says to the earth
you owe me.
Look what happens to a love
like that – it lights the whole sky.
– Hafiz

Retraining Taste Buds

The carrots I hold in my hand are fresh from a local garden. They’re dirty and have wild bushy green tops. I wash and peel the carrots then pick up the knife. I have a long way to go until I can maneuver this utensil like those chefs on the Food Network, but I’m getting better. Faster.

I cut the carrots, chop the onion, dice the celery, slice the mushrooms and throw everything into a skillet with water. While the veggies are steam sautéing I boil tri-colored pasta in a medium pot and steam spinach in a small one. I add tomatoes and tomato sauce to the skillet. When the pasta and spinach are ready I add those too, along with garlic and oregano.

My husband, Ron, wanders in the kitchen.

“What’s for dinner?” he asks.

“Italian Skillet Casserole,” I say.

He leans over my shoulder and investigates the simmering dish on the stovetop.

“Almost all veggies,” I point out.

Cooking healthier foods has been challenging in certain ways, but one thing I completely forgot about when I started this new path is that my husband can’t stand vegetables. He’ll eat certain items (broccoli or beans or salad) because he knows they’re good for him, but he would prefer them as a side dish, not the main dish.

But it just so happens that his company is having a Vegetable Challenge this summer.

So perfect timing.

I scoop out the meal into two bowls, light some candles, and sit down.

It’s delicious, and I look at Ron to see what he thinks. He’s pushing a piece of onion, a hunk of tomato, and a mushroom slice to the side. “I can eat them when they’re small, but these big pieces…” he shakes his head.

“You need to retrain your taste buds,” I suggest softly.

He’s a good sport so he takes a huge spoonful, onion chunks and all, and gives it a go. He likes it. This truly is one of the tastier dishes I’ve made, and when I’m done I push my bowl aside and lean back in the chair.

“Hey, what’s that?” Ron says, peering into my bowl.

“Nothing,” I say.

“Uh-huh,” Ron nods, smirking.

Okay, okay. So I really do consider myself a vegetable lover, but I’ve always struggled with cooked carrots. There is small pile of them left. I guess we both have some retraining to work through.

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