Tag Archives: bilingual

The Douglas Tilden 5K/10K Walk / Run for Deaf Humanity will be held in San Francisco at the Golden Gate Park on Sunday, June 2, 2013.  If you sign up for the event by May 31st, the registration is $31.00 for adults and $16.00 for teenagers under the age of 18.  If you pay at […]

Science Daily published that article on September 28, 2012.  This article summarized research regarding children and how they process language.  The first part of the article was not about Deaf children.  Some Spanish researchers in Spain researched the relationship between language and different types of perception. The second part of the article from Science Daily […]

Deaf children benefit from learning sign language and another language, according to research from LaTrobe University in Australia.  ASL can help children become bilingual.  ASL helps them develop a written and spoken language. Many doctors and audiologists discourage parents from teaching ASL to Deaf children.  This research shows Deaf children learn the written and spoken language more […]

Metronidazole and Alcohol – Why You Shouldn’t Mix Them!

 

Many times we are told by our doctors not to combine certain medicines with other drugs and chemicals due to its potential side effects and drug interactions. Before you are prescribed with certain medicines by your doctor, you should be well aware of the precautions as well as how the medications will function so that you will know what to expect. Generally this is part of the patient safety rules. That is why you will find a leaflet packed together with the medicines you have bought so you can have something to glance on during your treatment. Leaflets contain the general instructions, precautions, the general dos and don’ts, as well as a brief list of drugs or chemical that you should never combine with your medication.

 

Metronidazole is an effective antibiotic drug intended for the treatment of infections caused by various singled-cell bacteria and parasites. Infections are quite very common but can be dangerous if left untreated. Although we are naturally gifted with our immune system to fight those invaders, often times it may not be enough to fully prevent infections that lead to several illnesses. This is why antibiotics such as metronidazole have been designed to eradicate the bacteria and certain parasites out from our system.

Read more…

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

Can I Buy Diflucan Over The Counter?

Over the counter medicines are drugs that can be sold directly to patients having a valid prescription from a doctor or any healthcare professionals. The reason why some drugs are not allowed to be sold directly to consumers over the counter is to make sure that these drugs will only be given to the right patients with the right illness. Some people may think that they already know everything about drugs, or some might think that  some drugs intended for a specific illness that have been prescribed to someone they know, would still be applicable to them; but that kind of thinking should never be pursued.

All drugs have different formulation and ingredients. Some may contain harmful or poisonous ingredients, some might cause drug addiction that could be used for wrong doings, and some drugs might contain an ingredient that can make a person allergic. These are the reasons why not all drugs are sold directly over the counter. Over the counter drugs are regulated by selected regulatory agencies which checks the drug whether it is safe to be taken by common consumers.

Fungal infections are common illness acquired by people and are mainly caused by bacterial infections. To treat these fungal diseases, antifungal agents should be taken just like Fluconazole or Diflucan. The thing about this medicine (Diflucan) is that it is a broad spectrum antifungal agent; it means that it kills a wide range of bacteria. Diflucan are available in tablets and IV (Intravenous injection). Diflucan is used to treat candidal infections caused by the Candida bacteria, urinary tract infections, peritonitis, and pneumonia. Read more…

Finding Flexibility in Inflexibility

Week 2 of my six-week stint at a newspaper is coming to a close. Four more weeks to go. It’s a blessing, as a freelancer, to have the opportunity to be a part of these projects (steady work! money! live interaction with creatures other than my dog!). But man, the corporate life wipes me out.

I get home from work about 7:30 p.m., make dinner, eat, and plop into bed by 9:00 p.m., exhausted, where I drag my laptop on my lap and spend another couple of hours swaying between vegging out and trying to keep up with my other assignments. The evening yoga class I’d planned to attend? Skipped again.

The other night during one of my zombie-like states, I was flipping through Yoga Journal magazine. The question of the month just so happened to be from a reader who wants to dedicate more time to a yoga practice but finds that work leaves little time or energy to do so.

The yogi who answered the reader question suggested three options (1) back off of a less fulfilling activity and replace it with yoga; (2) spend less time working and more time practicing (which probably means adjusting your standard of living since you’ll presumably make less money if you cut back on work); or (3) make yoga a priority in your free time.

For now I’m choosing option three — switching to a weekend yoga class instead of trying to cram a class in after work when I’m tired and hungry.

Do you have an inflexible schedule that makes practicing yoga more challenging? How do you adjust?

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