Tag Archives: asl

NECA Washington Watch

TRS
Ex Parte—GC Docket No. 10-51
5/3/10—Sorenson spoke with Eddie Lazarus, Chief of Staff to Chairman Genachowski to express concern with NECA’s recent rate proposals for VRS service.  Sorenson argued that a decision to base the VRS rate on providers’ “historical costs” would have a devastating impact on [...]

For Immediate Release
Wednesday, May 5, 2010
Contacts:
Rosaline Crawford (NAD) (Voice and TTY)
Eric Bridges (ACB)
Adrianna Montague-Gray (AFB)
Jenifer Simpson (AAPD)

Senators Mark Pryor and John Kerry Introduce the Equal Access to 21st Century Communications Act (S. 3304)
May 5, 2010, Washington, DC:–The Coalition of Organizations for Accessible Technology (COAT) thanks Senators Mark Pryor [...]

Class Claims Pennsylvania Isolates the Deaf
Courthouse News Service
By ERIN MCAULEY
HARRISBURG, Pa. (CN) – The Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare discriminates against the mentally retarded and deaf, a class action claims in Federal Court. Lead plaintiff Harry M., 67, deaf and mentally retarded, was placed in a home with a staff that does not know sign [...]

Catholic Diocese of Green Bay delays naming Rev. Guy Blair’s successor
Officials continue to meet with St. John’s parishioners
GREENBAY PRESS GAZETTE
BY CHARLES DAVIS • • MAY 5, 2010
The Rev. Guy Blair’s transfer to Combined Locks is final, but the announcement of his successor at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Green Bay has been [...]

St. John’s Deaf Parishioners Want Their Message Seen
Updated: May 3, 2010 11:42 PM
WBAY
By Matt Smith
Wisconsin
A Green Bay priest instrumental in working with the deaf community is being transferred, and Monday night parishioners wanted to send a message to the bishop.
Last week the diocese announced the transfer of Father Guy Blair from St. John the Evangelist [...]

Priest to Deaf Community Says “Their Heart is Broken” by His Transfer
WBAY
By Sarah Thomsen
Wisconsin
The Catholic Diocese of Green Bay won’t name a new pastor for St. John the Evangelist Parish in downtown Green Bay for a few more days.
The diocese delayed an announcement about a successor for Father Guy Blair, who the diocese announced is [...]

- St. Louis Post-Dispatch. April 26, 2010
Late last September, police took a 36-year-old St. Louis woman to a psychiatric hospital emergency room. She was depressed and suicidal.
It took a while for doctors at the hospital to interview the woman. No one could speak her language. Several hours passed before an interpreter arrived.
That delay might be [...]

NECA Washington Watch

TRS
Ex Parte—CG Docket No. 10-51
4/28/10—CSDVRS met with CGB and DRO staff to discuss a new rate structure for VRS.  CSDVRS said the FCC’s decision to move to a tiered multi-year rate was the right decision, but also said the methodology could be improved.  CSDCRS proposed adding [...]

Interpreted show at Nazareth

Please share if appropriate with other deaf people:
I saw the play today with an interpreter. It was deeply moving. They informed me afterwards that they have an interpreter (same one) assigned for this Sunday as well. Just show up half hour early to buy tickets. Nazareth Box office asked me to [...]

Harrisburg offers to take deaf students

//
Associated Press – April 30, 2010 8:55 AM ET
HARRISBURG, S.D. (AP) – The Harrisburg School District is offering to take the five remaining students at the South Dakota School for the Deaf.
The Board of Regents, which oversees the Siou
To see the rest of article  click on http://www.kcautv.com/Global/story.asp?S=12403594

Confused about Coffee

The first time I tried to stop drinking coffee I was working as a lawyer. It was a busy time at the firm, so I honestly don’t know what possessed me to quit cold turkey. I began having headaches on top of the long hours. Six months went by. The headaches stopped (the long hours didn’t). Eventually, I caved. I wanted that energy jolt again. Plus, the taste. Mmmm…the taste.

The second time I tried to stop drinking coffee I was trying to get pregnant. This time I weaned myself slowly. I ordered a small instead of a medium. Then a half regular, half decaf. Finally I made the switch to non-caffeine tea.

After I lost the baby (miscarriage), I was drinking coffee within days.

When I made a commitment to Clean Eating, I thought, Third time’s a charm. But now that I’m well on my way down the path of eating wholesome foods, I’ll say this: drastically reducing my intake of sugar and white flour while drastically increasing my fruit and veggies has been pretty smooth sailing. But the coffee…oh, how I miss it when I don’t drink it.

I just can’t seem to kick it (well, it’s more like I’m unwilling to give it an honest try). I keep reading articles about the benefits of coffee (antioxidants, etc), but really, part of me think that’s like those articles that claim dark chocolate is good for you for the same reasons (antioxidants).

Really, shouldn’t we just eat blueberries?

To make a long story longer, I’m still on the fence about coffee (thus have not given it up). I enjoy the aroma and flavor so much. Plus, unlike sugar which makes me feel bleh inside, coffee makes me feel good (but I know, I know…it increases my blood pressure and doesn’t help with my anxiety issues). So I sit in confusion. I tell myself that out of all the vices in the world caffeine isn’t so bad. (Can you tell I’m piling on the excuses here or what?)

I’d love to hear from others who are dedicated to eating clean, healthy foods. What’s your take on your morning cuppa joe (or lack thereof)? Š

Remembering the Golden Rule

When we lived in California my husband and I had two bamboo plants – one on our coffee table and one in our kitchen. We had an indoor ivy plant above a corner piece in the living room. And we had a peace lily in a large flowerpot by our front door.

We enjoyed our plants. They livened up our space and added a splash of color.

We even named them: Lucky, Frogger, Stan and Lily.

But we weren’t very organized about feeding them. Half the time we presumed the other person had watered them when in reality neither of us had (we’d check and then panic because their soil was extra dry). Other times we assumed the other person had forgotten to take care of the plants, so we’d both wind up watering them and then over-saturating their soil.

We had a confusing schedule with our dog too. Some days we decided to give her one scoop of food in the morning and another scoop at night. Other days we decide to give her nothing in the morning and two scoops at night. And everyday we’d have a discussion about who fed her, when we fed her, and whether she needed to be fed again. When we moved from California we gave our plants away but kept the dog. Our daily discussions over the feeding routine of our adorable mutt have continued.

We’ve often said to each other: “We need to come up with one schedule for the plants/pets and stick to it.” But no plan we thought of worked very well. Right about the time I was making the switch to Clean Eating. I read an article that suggested feeding your pets and plants before you prepare your own meals.

In other words, serve others before serving yourself.

What a great idea. After all, when I was growing up the golden rule at the dinner table was Offer the food dishes to others before taking it yourself. One summer I worked at a camp where we actually served the person to our right – I would put a piece of chicken, a spoon of broccoli, and a roll on my neighbor’s plate. Then that person would serve the person to her right, and so on…

Feeding pets and plants before meals would not only keep all the living creatures in our household on a regular schedule, it would help us transition into the intention of mindful eating. By stepping back and taking care of the needs of others first, we are reminded of how much has been given to us: our health, our bodies, and the food we are about to put inside it.

Peace & Blessings. Š

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

Walking Barefoot

I’m at the BlogHer conference in downtown Chicago mingling with 800 other women (promise I’ll link to some great food and yoga blogs once I process all the info that’s pouring into my brain).

The first day, I decided to get some exercise by walking from the train station to the conference center. I was wearing sandals and carrying a heavy laptop bag. I got lost. One hour and five blisters later, I finally arrived. I was smart enough to take a cab back to the train station that night, but once I made it to the suburbs (where I’m staying with a friend) I had to walk another mile to their house. My friend’s husband, Brad, was with me, and he watched as I limped and cringed.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said as my sandals rubbed against my blisters.

I slipped off my shoes.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said again as the sharp little pebbles on the roads and sidewalks cut my feet.

“You’re a yoga blogger!” Brad said.

“What does that have to do with anything?” I asked.

“Some yogis walk over hot coals and stuff,” he pointed out.

Now that he mentioned it, I did recall reading a passage in a book about firewalking at a yoga retreat. Although none of the yoga classes I’ve attended have involved hot coals, we do practice in bare feet. Still, smooth wood floors and soft sticky mats may help strengthen my soul, but they don’t sturdy up the skin on my soles.

Walking home that night, I stepped off the sidewalk and onto the grass. It was long and cool and damp. It cushioned my bare feet and brushed in between my toes. I completely forgot about my blisters as I focused on how nice it felt to observe the world through from the bottom up. It had been a long time since I’ve walked barefoot in the grass.

To some, barefoot hiking is a hobby. Richard Frazine wrote a book about it called The Barefoot Hiker, and Common Ground, a sustainable living magazine, wrote an article about it here.

How often do we take time to feel the crunch of leaves or the slick slime of moss or the powder puffs of dirt through our feet and toes? Not to mention walking barefoot is gentle on the planet. I think I will start taking off my shoes more often, especially outside.

As quoted on this website, Sitting Bull said:  “Healthy feet can hear the very heart of Mother Earth.”

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