Tag Archives: asl

The Deaf Seniors of America will have their Conference and activities prior to the Conference in Baltimore from August 21st through August 27th this year.   If you pay for combo tickets before July 31st, you can save money.  

Signing Time Instructor Christine Fitzgerald is proud to announce that Emmy-nominated Rachel Coleman, host of Signing Time, will be performing for children and families in the Hollywood Hills this spring. The Signing Time Foundation Community Event on May 11th will be held at 2:30 p.m. at The Hall of Liberty. The VIP event starts at […]

The first annual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Wellness Fair will be in Indio (near Palm Springs) on May 16, 2013.  Here is some more info: Announcing the – First Annual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Wellness Fair DATE:    Thursday May 16, 2013    TIME:      4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.   PLACE:  Riverside County Office of Education, 47336 Oasis St., Indio, CA 92201   THERE […]

The Statewide California Association of the Deaf meeting will be at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (CSDR) on Sunday, May 5, 2013 from 9 to 5.  

The Douglas Tilden 5K/10K Walk / Run for Deaf Humanity will be held in San Francisco at the Golden Gate Park on Sunday, June 2, 2013.  If you sign up for the event by May 31st, the registration is $31.00 for adults and $16.00 for teenagers under the age of 18.  If you pay at […]

Summer Institute at CSUN

California State University, Northridge will hold its 6th Summer Institute from June 17-21 and June 24-28, 2013.  It will be sponsored by the National Institute on Deafness (NCOD).  Early bird rates are offered between now and May 17, 2013, and they are offering 40 hours of courses for $400.00.  They will have classes such as […]

ADARA Conference To Be Held in Minneapolis, Minnesota

The American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association (ADARA) is having their conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 29 to June 1, 2013.  The conference theme is “Blazing New Trails.”  They will have workshops in mental health/chemical dependency, rehabilitation, transition/independent living, and professional development.  The early bird registration fee for the whole conference is $325.00.

The Deaf Business Symposium will be held by DCARA in Berkeley on April 19 – April 21, 2013.  It will cover various topics such as networking, goal setting, business law, and negotiating.  The registration fee is $90.00.

A  former teacher and former director of the Center on Deafness – Inland Empire (CODIE) will have a celebration of life at the California School for the Deaf at Riverside on April 13, 2013 starting at 2:00 p.m.  Seymour Bernstein was 80 years old when he  died on February 12, 2013.

The California School for the Deaf at Fremont is presenting a play called “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.”  The high school drama club will perform this play on May 2, May 3, and May 4th.  Some of the shows will be voice interpreted.  

Germaphobe

The waiter walks over and sets a glass of ice-water on the table.

“Ew,” my mom says when he walks away. “I don’t like it when restaurants put lemons in your drink.”

For years she’s claimed that lemon wedges have tons of bacteria – picked up because of how much they are handled by bare human hands – and this YouTube video seems to prove she’s right, reporting that over 77% of lemon wedges in drinks tested positive for disease causing bacteria.

My husband has an issue with restaurants that place the silverware directly on the table instead of on a napkin or tablecloth. When I tell him the tables are washed, he says, “Yeah, but have you seen those ratty rags they use?”

What a bunch of germaphobes!

Except I have my issues too. I don’t like touching menus. I especially can’t stand it when a waiter places a menu down on top of my plate. I mean really, when are menus cleaned?

I’m totally of the belief that exposure to bad bacteria can build my immune system. And, logically, I know that menus are only one of many places I’m coming across a boatload of germs. But still, menus freak me out.

Do you have any quirky things you’re a germ-freak about?

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

Hearty Vegetable Lentil Soup

We’ve been making this lentil soup* all winter. We finally have it down:

I pour 5 cups of organic, low sodium chicken broth into the big pot.
Ron chops 2 celery stalks, 1 large carrot, and minces 2 cloves of garlic.
I chop 1 medium onion, 1 red pepper, and 1 green pepper. Then measure out 1 cup of dry lentils.

We toss this first batch of ingredients into the pot and stir. Turn on the burner and, after it begins to boil, reduce it to a simmer for 40 minutes.

While it’s cooking, Ron and I are back to the cutting boards.

He’s got 3 red potatoes.
I have 1 zucchini.
He measures out the curry powder and basil (half a teaspoon each).
I measure out a half a cup of organic tomato sauce and drain a can of diced tomatoes.

Our second batch of ingredients goes in the pot for an extra 15 minutes at the end.

We keep sourdough bread in the freezer, and Ron thaws it out and toasts it up so we can dip it in the soup.

So tasty.

It’s the only part of winter I’m gonna miss.

~~~

*recipe from a Pritikin book I found on my parents’ bookshelf

Basic Equipment

I enjoy the beginning of yoga class because the opening is generally “easy” – well, at least physically (the meditating part can bring up its own set of challenges).

But before we practice some of the more difficult poses, we usually we open by sitting in Sukhasana for a few minutes. And then maybe move onto our hands and knees to practice Dog Tilt and Cat Pose. It’s a place for gentle movements. A time to bring awareness to our breath.

The other day at the beginning of class, we were on our hands and knees with a neutral spine (tabletop). The teacher asked us to lift our right arm off the ground and straighten it so it pointed forward. Both of our arms were engaged. The left one pushing the floor away, and the right one reaching for the wall in front of us (in a way where we weren’t scrunching our shoulder blade up to our neck). She had us hold that position. For a long, long time. It was hard. (Don’t believe me? Try it.)

“Some poses can be deceptive,” the teacher said. “Not as easy as they seem.”

I love that about yoga. I love that I don’t need an expensive gym membership or fancy equipment or special shoes to build flexibility and strength. I just need my body, my mind, and my spirit.Š

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