Tag Archives: ada

A deaf man in California tried to communicate with AccountNow via e-mail.  He had recently become deaf due to a stroke.  The company insisted on communicating with him via telephone, and he was unable to use the phone.  Richard Halaviais, who had difficulty with paying his medical bills due to not being able to get […]

Doctor to Pay Patient Because He Did Not Provide Interpreter

Dr. David Bullek of New Jersey settled a complaint from a deaf patient who made an appointment to see him in 2006.  The state Civil Rights Division said he also agreed to attend training to learn about reasonable accommodation for patients with disabilities.  

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Plaintiffs Charge that Netflix Violates the Americans with Disabilities Act by Not Providing Equal Access to its “Watch Instantly” Streaming Content. An estimated 36 million Americans are deaf or hard of hearing. The deaf and hard of hearing community has repeatedly expressed concerns—via letters, petitions, blogs, and social media—to Netflix […]

U.S. EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION v. UPS SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS

The Leagle U.S. EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION v. UPS SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS U.S. EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION, Plaintiff-Appellant, v. UPS SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS, Defendant-Appellee. No. 08-56874. United States Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit. Argued and Submitted March 4, 2010 — Pasadena, California. Filed August 27, 2010. Jennifer S. Goldstein (argued), EEOC, Washington, D.C., Anna Y. […]

On 20th anniversary of ADA Workers World By Cheryl LaBash Published Aug 8, 2010 11:41 PM Although the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act was celebrated across the U.S. on July 26 with much publicity, in a corner of Detroit the practical struggle to implement it was quietly playing out in the struggle […]

From White House

From the White House, President Obama’s message on ADA

VIA NAD, FCC’s Video

FCC created a video celebrating ADA.

On the heels of the 20th anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley will today announce settlements her office has reached with the largest national movie theater chains to provide deaf and blind patrons with access at all of their locations in Massachusetts.

A copyrighted radio broadcast regarding ADA transcript can be found at

Phoenix Business Journal The Americans With Disabilities Act celebrates its 20th anniversary today. It was a landmark piece of legislation that has restored dignity to millions of Americans. Phil Pangrazio, executive director of Arizona Bridge to Independent Living, remembers

Vardenafil HCL — Your Effective Medication for Impotency

Impotency is just one of the many challenges a man could experience, and if you happen to acquire this symptom, then you have just landed on the right page. Although there are many drugs available in the market these days for treating erection difficulties, you can find Vardenafil HCL 20mg medication as one of the most prescribed drugs by your doctor.

Vardenafil basically works by pumping more blood supply towards the male organ to help stimulate sexual drive. However, the drug does not guarantee you a lifetime treatment – ED is incurable and the drugs available such as Vardenafil are only instruments to improve sexual performance. Of course, you have to be sexually aroused to appreciate the results of this medication.

How to take Vardenafil

Take this medication by swallowing the tablet immediately – don’t break, split, crush, or chew the tablet. You can also take this drug with your regular meals, or even without food. Vardenafil should work 60 minutes after the medicine has been ingested.
Doctors may recommend you the appropriate dosage as well as the proper interval of time in taking your medications. Follow the prescriptions sincerely and read the labels so you will have information about how the drug should work. Never attempt to go beyond the prescription or taking the drug more often than what is recommended; otherwise, the possible side effects will be magnified and you will likely experience the negative symptoms. Read more…

The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

Basic Equipment

I enjoy the beginning of yoga class because the opening is generally “easy” – well, at least physically (the meditating part can bring up its own set of challenges).

But before we practice some of the more difficult poses, we usually we open by sitting in Sukhasana for a few minutes. And then maybe move onto our hands and knees to practice Dog Tilt and Cat Pose. It’s a place for gentle movements. A time to bring awareness to our breath.

The other day at the beginning of class, we were on our hands and knees with a neutral spine (tabletop). The teacher asked us to lift our right arm off the ground and straighten it so it pointed forward. Both of our arms were engaged. The left one pushing the floor away, and the right one reaching for the wall in front of us (in a way where we weren’t scrunching our shoulder blade up to our neck). She had us hold that position. For a long, long time. It was hard. (Don’t believe me? Try it.)

“Some poses can be deceptive,” the teacher said. “Not as easy as they seem.”

I love that about yoga. I love that I don’t need an expensive gym membership or fancy equipment or special shoes to build flexibility and strength. I just need my body, my mind, and my spirit.Š

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

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