PHOENIX ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF, INC


PHOENIX ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF, INC
PAD is hosting Super Bowl XLV
Where: Phoenix Deaf Community Center
1545 W. Osborn Road
Phoenix, Arizona 85015
When:    February 6, 2011
Admission & Food:
Individual Adult – $10.00
Couple Adults (2) – $15.00
Children (10 years old and under) $3.00
Children (11 years old to 18 years old) $5.00 with student I. D.
Food: Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, Chips, Dips, Potato Salad and much more …..
Drinks: Sodas/Kool Aid
Time: 1:00 p.m.
Kick off start at 4:30 p.m.
Dinner at 4:00 p.m.
Super Bowl Pool, Poker, Texas Holem and 31 at 1 p.m.
Proceeds to PAD Fund (Athletic Fund()
Any questions: Contact Les Roberts at

Leave a Reply

You must be to post a comment.

Pain Relief with Tramadol 50mg

Every human feels pain during his lifetime. There are different types of pain but they all can be alleviated. A lot of pain medications are available on the market now and it may be hard to choose among all this diversity. If you experience pain and it’s difficult for you to choose a drug, we advise you to try Tramadol. Tramadol is a medication used to ease intense pain. It is approved by the FDA which means it is a safe and effective type of medicine.

 

imagesTramadol is prescribed for people who experience violent pain. It changes the pain perception of the body. Tramadol 50 mg is the perfect solution for older people who have osteoarthritis, renal colic, or painful trauma. There are two types of Tramadol tablets: a simple pill and a long-acting tablet. Long-acting pill provides a more prolonged reduction in pain, but it may be contraindicated for some people. Consult your health care provider for more information. You should take one long-acting Tramadol pill per day with food. Simple Tramadol 50 mg pills are taken every 5 hours regardless of food.
Tramadol hcl is a pretty strong medicine, so you should be careful and follow the instructions on the prescription label. Improper use of the drug can cause different dangerous side effects. It can also be habit-forming. Contact the doctor if your mood swings. It may be the sign of the beginning of dependence.

Read more…

Downhill

I carefully set out my outfit.

Organized my purse.

Planned breakfast.

Gathered the leash to walk the dog.

And then, finally, set my alarm clock.

As a writer, I’ve been working out of the home for a couple years, but Monday morning I was due in a company’s corporate offices for a six-week, on-site editorial gig. I’m not a morning person at all, so the night before, I needed to prepare.

Food-wise, the first day went okay. I ate fruit and oatmeal for breakfast, had a tuna sandwich in the office’s cafeteria for lunch, and, back home, had enough energy left over to cook a healthy vegetable-based dinner. That was Day 1. The rest of week I watched myself slide downhill. (I’d forgotten how corporate jobs suck every second of your time away – making it hard to prepare fresh meals. Oh, and the sugar. Being Valentine’s week, the chocolate overload running through that office – Oy! I ate too much of it.) By Friday, my fridge was bare (no breakfast fruit), I was still eating tuna for lunch (hello – mercury overload?), and dinner was refined pasta at a restaurant.

My throat felt a little . . . sore. OMG, was I getting a cold? Dang it. I didn’t have a single cold in 2007, and I suspect it was because my immune system was stronger due to better eating habits.

“I haven’t eaten one vegetable today,” I said to Ron Friday night. (I’m not counting a wilted piece of lettuce and green tomato slice on my tuna sandwich as real vegetables).

Saturday morning, as my sinuses clogged and my throat felt worse, I rushed my husband out the door with a grocery list. I juiced vegetables and drank the concoction down in a few gulps. I ate an orange. For lunch, I made a homemade bean soup. I ate another orange. For dinner I made a veggie omelet.

Too late. I officially had a cold. I knew the best thing I could do for myself was rest. I cancelled all weekend plans, and I slept and drank hot tea. In bed Sunday night, I figured I’d be calling in sick the next day. But miraculously, I woke up cured. Again, I blame the vegetables for the quick recovery.

This week I’m doing better (not great, but better) managing the “office” life. Our home fridge is stocked with healthy foods to choose from in the morning, I’m packing my lunch (dark leafy green salad with cranberries, walnuts, and a little goat cheese), and dinner is mapped out (today we’re having a brown rice risotto with asparagus and a mixed greens salad).

I’ll be sure to toast to good health.

Welcome, Loved One

A few weeks ago I was in Tulum, Mexico for a week of yoga, meditation and silent beach walks. I arrived at night after everyone else had gone to sleep. Inside my cabana two flickering candles revealed a comfy bed draped in mosquito netting with a welcome card on the pillow. I picked up the card and read what was written. Holding it next to my heart I smiled. Then I crawled under the covers and drifted off to sleep.

The next morning as I was journaling in my notebook, I thought about the card and scribbled down what it had said: You are worth loving. I had a funny feeling that what I wrote wasn’t quite right, so I went back to my cabana to double-check. Sure enough, I had misquoted the card. It actually read: I am worth loving.

Notice the difference?

Why is it so easy to believe others are worth loving, but so hard to believe it about ourselves? Why is it difficult to say? To know? To live?

This isn’t a narcissistic kind of love; rather, it’s a “love your neighbor as yourself” kind of love. Eating mindfully, treating ourselves with kindness, practicing yoga — these are ways we can love ourselves by being stewards of our body and soul.

I began practicing yoga years ago after watching my then-boyfriend (now husband) ease into a backbend with grace. To this day I still can’t do that, but it doesn’t matter because self-love is about accepting myself for who I am, not what I can achieve. I will be blogging about yoga twice a week for the Eat Wasa Feel Good team (my partner, Zandria, introduced herself yesterday as the vegan blogger).

So here’s a warm welcome to you, loved one, and an invitation to join me on this journey. Feel free to post comments, questions or ideas. You can also e-mail me or visit my personal blog, Roughly Speaking.

Oh, by the way, my name is Jenny. And I am worth loving.

Wasa with Feta, Cherry Tomatoes and Red Onion

Ingredients

1 tablespoon red onion, sliced thin
2 tablespoons crumbled reduced-fat feta cheese
2 leaves fresh basil
¼ cup cherry or grape tomatoes cut in half
2 pieces WASA Fiber Rye Crispbread (may substitute other WASA Crispbread flavors)

Directions

Place tomatoes on cracker.
Sprinkle with feta cheese. Top with onion and basil and serve.

Tip: substitute fresh mozzarella or goat cheese for feta cheese

Prep time: 10 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 54
Total Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 7 mg
Sodium 141 mg
Total Carbohydrate 7 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 3 g
Calcium 6% of daily value

Category Specific RSS

Archives

Tags