CHARITY PANCAKE BREAKFAST (Austin, Texas)

CHARITY PANCAKE BREAKFAST – Feb 5

WHAT:         Austin SERTOMA Club’s 6th Annual Pancake Breakfast

Proceeds benefit the Austin SERTOMA Club’s sponsorship programs for Texas’ deaf and        hard of hearing community.

WHEN:         Saturday, February 5, 2011 – 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

WHERE:         Texas School for the Deaf (TSD) cafeteria

1102 South Congress Avenue, Austin Texas 78704

(use Elizabeth Street entrance)

SERVING:      All-U-CAN-EAT Pancakes, Bacon, Eggs, Coffee, Juice, and all the trimmings

Tickets:          $5 advance

$6 at the door

Children 6 & under – FREE

Door Prizes & Live Music by “Last Train Out”

Sponsored by: I-HOP, Dominican Joe & Guero’s Taco Bar

CONTACT:        Jim Hull

Keena Miller ; ,

or visit: www.austinsertoma.org.

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Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

A Time to Cleanse

Don’t eat anything after 7pm.

I heard that tip on Oprah. The rationale had something to do with losing weight and the fact that it’s easier to burn calories during the day rather than at night when we’re watching TV, reading, or sitting around talking. Part of it sounded reasonable (I guess), but another part of it sounded like a silly rule or restriction that may or may not be good for a person’s particular body. After the show, I forget the tip completely and ate past 7pm a lot.

When I began Clean Eating, I started thinking about that suggestion again. Gradually, I made dinner my final meal of the day and stopped mindless snacking afterwards. My husband and I usually don’t eat until 8pm anyway, but there was another reason why I stuck to the plan: I finally understood the rationale behind Oprah’s tip. Marilyn Polk sums it up nicely in one of the cookbooks I’m reading:

“Our bodies need a chance to cleanse, heal, and rest. Most Americans are so busy poking food into their mouths throughout the day and night that their bodies do not have a chance to cleanse, heal, or rest.”

It’s like the Eagles song based on the bible verse: There is a time for everything. A time to live and a time to die. A time to plant and a time to uproot. The idea of giving my body a time eat – and then later a time to cleanse – made so much sense. Simple. Good. Common sense. And of course, it’s only a guideline. If I’m ravenous after 8pm by all means I will eat something! That makes sense too. Š

Finding Flexibility in Inflexibility

Week 2 of my six-week stint at a newspaper is coming to a close. Four more weeks to go. It’s a blessing, as a freelancer, to have the opportunity to be a part of these projects (steady work! money! live interaction with creatures other than my dog!). But man, the corporate life wipes me out.

I get home from work about 7:30 p.m., make dinner, eat, and plop into bed by 9:00 p.m., exhausted, where I drag my laptop on my lap and spend another couple of hours swaying between vegging out and trying to keep up with my other assignments. The evening yoga class I’d planned to attend? Skipped again.

The other night during one of my zombie-like states, I was flipping through Yoga Journal magazine. The question of the month just so happened to be from a reader who wants to dedicate more time to a yoga practice but finds that work leaves little time or energy to do so.

The yogi who answered the reader question suggested three options (1) back off of a less fulfilling activity and replace it with yoga; (2) spend less time working and more time practicing (which probably means adjusting your standard of living since you’ll presumably make less money if you cut back on work); or (3) make yoga a priority in your free time.

For now I’m choosing option three — switching to a weekend yoga class instead of trying to cram a class in after work when I’m tired and hungry.

Do you have an inflexible schedule that makes practicing yoga more challenging? How do you adjust?

Addicting Appetizer

Here is one of my favorite appetizers involving Wasa crispbread.

I searched Wasa’s recipe page and it’s on not on there, so I’m feeling rather innovative (except that I didn’t create it – the recipe was passed along by a friend of mine, but anyway . . .)

Spread a layer of organic cream cheese on Wasa crispbread.
Add two slices of cucumber.
Season with garlic power and sea salt.
Enjoy.

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