CHARITY PANCAKE BREAKFAST (Austin, Texas)

CHARITY PANCAKE BREAKFAST – Feb 5

WHAT:         Austin SERTOMA Club’s 6th Annual Pancake Breakfast

Proceeds benefit the Austin SERTOMA Club’s sponsorship programs for Texas’ deaf and        hard of hearing community.

WHEN:         Saturday, February 5, 2011 – 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

WHERE:         Texas School for the Deaf (TSD) cafeteria

1102 South Congress Avenue, Austin Texas 78704

(use Elizabeth Street entrance)

SERVING:      All-U-CAN-EAT Pancakes, Bacon, Eggs, Coffee, Juice, and all the trimmings

Tickets:          $5 advance

$6 at the door

Children 6 & under – FREE

Door Prizes & Live Music by “Last Train Out”

Sponsored by: I-HOP, Dominican Joe & Guero’s Taco Bar

CONTACT:        Jim Hull

Keena Miller ; ,

or visit: www.austinsertoma.org.

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Propecia Generic — Man’s Best Friend When It Comes to Male-Pattern Baldness

A majority of people usually think that men typically do not care much about their appearances.  This kind of thinking is actually very untrue, especially when it comes to the subject of androgenetic alopecia, or otherwise known as male-pattern baldness.  Men who are potentially going to suffer from this kind of condition (due to heredity) or those who are already going through a great deal of embarrassment and other negative emotions regarding baldness typically get to learn about one of its most well-known treatments, and that is, propecia generic.

Why is it called male-pattern baldness?

Male-pattern baldness is called like that simply because the balding process sort of follows a typical set pattern.  The initial stage of classic male-pattern baldness is typically a disappearing hairline, and then it is followed by the thinning and lessening of the hair near the temples and on the top of the head.  By the time these two balding areas meet in the center, it creates an illusion of a u-shaped hair surrounding the sides and the back of the head.  Even if this process of balding is really slow in most men suffering from it, unfortunately, they will turn out to be completely bald in the long run. Read more…

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

Welcome, Loved One

A few weeks ago I was in Tulum, Mexico for a week of yoga, meditation and silent beach walks. I arrived at night after everyone else had gone to sleep. Inside my cabana two flickering candles revealed a comfy bed draped in mosquito netting with a welcome card on the pillow. I picked up the card and read what was written. Holding it next to my heart I smiled. Then I crawled under the covers and drifted off to sleep.

The next morning as I was journaling in my notebook, I thought about the card and scribbled down what it had said: You are worth loving. I had a funny feeling that what I wrote wasn’t quite right, so I went back to my cabana to double-check. Sure enough, I had misquoted the card. It actually read: I am worth loving.

Notice the difference?

Why is it so easy to believe others are worth loving, but so hard to believe it about ourselves? Why is it difficult to say? To know? To live?

This isn’t a narcissistic kind of love; rather, it’s a “love your neighbor as yourself” kind of love. Eating mindfully, treating ourselves with kindness, practicing yoga — these are ways we can love ourselves by being stewards of our body and soul.

I began practicing yoga years ago after watching my then-boyfriend (now husband) ease into a backbend with grace. To this day I still can’t do that, but it doesn’t matter because self-love is about accepting myself for who I am, not what I can achieve. I will be blogging about yoga twice a week for the Eat Wasa Feel Good team (my partner, Zandria, introduced herself yesterday as the vegan blogger).

So here’s a warm welcome to you, loved one, and an invitation to join me on this journey. Feel free to post comments, questions or ideas. You can also e-mail me or visit my personal blog, Roughly Speaking.

Oh, by the way, my name is Jenny. And I am worth loving.

Wasa with Yogurt, Berries, and Pecans

Ingredients

¼ cup raspberries
¼ cup blueberries
¼ cup blackberries
1/3 cup pecans, slightly chopped
1/3 cup low fat vanilla or plain yogurt
3 pieces WASA Multigrain Crispbread (may substitute other WASA varieties)
Fresh mint leaves to garnish

Directions

Spread yogurt on WASA Crispbread. Top with equal amounts of berries and pecans.
Garnish with fresh mint if desired.

TIP: Store remaining ingredients in refrigerator for 4-5 days.
Substitute your favorite berries and nuts or your favorite yogurt.

Prep time: 10 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 181
Total Fat 10 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 1 mg
Sodium 144 mg
Total Carbohydrate 20 g
Dietary Fiber 4 g
Protein 5 g
Calcium 8% of daily value

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