Washington, DC – Career Opportunities in the Arts

Career Opportunities in the Arts

Interested in careers in the arts? The Kennedy Center’s Opening Stages Facebook Fan page is loaded with career opportunity announcements such as:

  • Internships
  • Fellowships
  • Competitions
  • Auditions
  • Grants/Funding
  • Scholarships

Opening Stages was developed to provide students and individuals with disabilities with information and resources on career development opportunities. The Fan page will highlight current disability-specific and mainstream opportunities, as well as upcoming exhibitions and performances featuring artists with disabilities.

The Kennedy Center Opening Stages fan page is open to all. Please become a fan and spread the word to anyone interested in pursuing a career in the arts.

Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences Open Auditions!

The Kennedy Center’s Theater for Young Audiences will be holding open auditions for the 2011-2012 season on the following dates:

Monday, February 7 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Equity Open Call

Sunday, February 13 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Non-Equity Open Call

The auditions will be held at the Kennedy Center located at 2700 F St. NW Washington, DC 20566. Enter through the Hall of Nations side of the building. Sign in at the Opera House Stage Door.

Preparation:

Please prepare a comedic, contemporary monologue, no longer than 2 minutes.

Actors interested in being considered for a musical production should prepare 16 bars of a standard musical theater song.

Piano accompaniment will be provided.

Please bring headshot and resume.

There will not be any appointments for these Open Call auditions.  Actors will be seen in the order in which they arrive. For questions or more information about the auditions, call or email  .

Accessibility accomodations (such as sign language interpreters) will be provided upon request. If you would like to request an accomodation, please contact the Accessibility Office at (voice/relay); (TTY) or .

ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the West Building Collection

Tours of the West Building collection are offered in American Sign Language (ASL) with voice interpretation into English on the second Sunday of each month at 1:00 PM, departing from the Rotunda on the West Building’s Main Floor. To learn more about this and other guided tours of the Gallery, please visit www.nga.gov/programs/tours .

In addition to these regularly occurring tours, sign language interpreters and guides for visitors who are blind or have low vision are available by appointment for tours of the permanent collection as well as for special exhibitions. Please call or the Gallery’s Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) at three weeks in advance for an appointment. Special headphones, which deliver full-frequency digital audio sound in a lightweight design, are available.

Printed scripts of all recorded tours are available for visitors who are deaf or hard of hearing, and free large-print brochures are available at the entrances to some of the special exhibitions. For more information, please visitwww.nga.gov/ginfo/access.shtm .

National Gallery of Art Seeking Museum Guides Fluent in ASL

The National Gallery of Art (NGA) is currently looking for experienced guides knowledgeable in art history to lead monthly tours in American Sign Language (ASL) as part of the program ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the West Building Collection. The West Building displays European and American art from the thirteenth to the early twentieth century. Masterpieces of Italian painting and sculpture, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Western Hemisphere, join works by the Dutch masters, French impressionists, and American artists.

To apply, please send a cover letter, résumé, and references to:

National Gallery of Art

Attn: Lorena Baines, DET

2000B South Club Drive

Landover, MD 20785

The application deadline is March 11, 2011.

For more information please contact Lorena Baines via e-mail at  or by phone at .

Job Opening: Technical Director

Rochester Institute of Technology

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rochester, NY

We are seeking a candidate that can teach technical theater courses in scenic, lighting and/or costume technology and serve as technical director for two productions per quarter/semester. Oversee construction, mounting, rigging, general theater maintenance, scenery, lighting, sound and costume elements of theater productions. Ensure over ad-ins, technical rehearsals, and post-production strikes. Successful candidate must be available during run of productions. This is a one-year appointment with possibility of annual renewal, contingent on performance and enrollment.

Please apply online at http://careers.rit.ed .

LOWT Auditions

Mark your calendars!  The 2011 LOWT Auditions will be held February 28 – March 2 (10 AM – 5 PM each day) at Round House Theatre in Silver Spring.

For more details visit www.lowt.org/auditions .

Thanks to John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Open My Heart

How many times have I been in Dandasana (Staff Pose) during a yoga class and listened to the teacher say, Open your chest? Same with Trikonasana (Triangle Pose) and many, many other poses.

My friend and fellow blogger Michelle of Full Soul Ahead was in a guided meditation when she heard the teacher say, “We often hunch our shoulders as a way to protect our hearts.” Michelle blogged about the symbolic meaning of that tendency over here: Open Heart. A beautiful post and well worth checking out.

Not that long ago I was reading Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert and came across the passage where a recovering addict had prayed continuously that God would open his heart. When the man was rushed to the hospital for surgery, he remembered thinking, God, I didn’t mean literally! (The story goes something like that – I don’t have the book with me to look it up).

Anyway. Open my heart, God. What a great prayer. I realized today that it’s so much easier to “open my heart” when things are going well. When life is good, my work is being published, my husband and I are laughing together, and the sun is shining, it’s so easy to take a big breath and stand up tall and let my chest expand and be graceful and appreciative and joyful towards others and towards the world.

But when dark times come…oh, those are the moments where I tend to get frustrated or angry and want to quit. But I think maybe it’s during those times when the heart needs to open up and grow most of all.

Walking Barefoot

I’m at the BlogHer conference in downtown Chicago mingling with 800 other women (promise I’ll link to some great food and yoga blogs once I process all the info that’s pouring into my brain).

The first day, I decided to get some exercise by walking from the train station to the conference center. I was wearing sandals and carrying a heavy laptop bag. I got lost. One hour and five blisters later, I finally arrived. I was smart enough to take a cab back to the train station that night, but once I made it to the suburbs (where I’m staying with a friend) I had to walk another mile to their house. My friend’s husband, Brad, was with me, and he watched as I limped and cringed.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said as my sandals rubbed against my blisters.

I slipped off my shoes.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said again as the sharp little pebbles on the roads and sidewalks cut my feet.

“You’re a yoga blogger!” Brad said.

“What does that have to do with anything?” I asked.

“Some yogis walk over hot coals and stuff,” he pointed out.

Now that he mentioned it, I did recall reading a passage in a book about firewalking at a yoga retreat. Although none of the yoga classes I’ve attended have involved hot coals, we do practice in bare feet. Still, smooth wood floors and soft sticky mats may help strengthen my soul, but they don’t sturdy up the skin on my soles.

Walking home that night, I stepped off the sidewalk and onto the grass. It was long and cool and damp. It cushioned my bare feet and brushed in between my toes. I completely forgot about my blisters as I focused on how nice it felt to observe the world through from the bottom up. It had been a long time since I’ve walked barefoot in the grass.

To some, barefoot hiking is a hobby. Richard Frazine wrote a book about it called The Barefoot Hiker, and Common Ground, a sustainable living magazine, wrote an article about it here.

How often do we take time to feel the crunch of leaves or the slick slime of moss or the powder puffs of dirt through our feet and toes? Not to mention walking barefoot is gentle on the planet. I think I will start taking off my shoes more often, especially outside.

As quoted on this website, Sitting Bull said:  “Healthy feet can hear the very heart of Mother Earth.”

Remembering the Golden Rule

When we lived in California my husband and I had two bamboo plants – one on our coffee table and one in our kitchen. We had an indoor ivy plant above a corner piece in the living room. And we had a peace lily in a large flowerpot by our front door.

We enjoyed our plants. They livened up our space and added a splash of color.

We even named them: Lucky, Frogger, Stan and Lily.

But we weren’t very organized about feeding them. Half the time we presumed the other person had watered them when in reality neither of us had (we’d check and then panic because their soil was extra dry). Other times we assumed the other person had forgotten to take care of the plants, so we’d both wind up watering them and then over-saturating their soil.

We had a confusing schedule with our dog too. Some days we decided to give her one scoop of food in the morning and another scoop at night. Other days we decide to give her nothing in the morning and two scoops at night. And everyday we’d have a discussion about who fed her, when we fed her, and whether she needed to be fed again. When we moved from California we gave our plants away but kept the dog. Our daily discussions over the feeding routine of our adorable mutt have continued.

We’ve often said to each other: “We need to come up with one schedule for the plants/pets and stick to it.” But no plan we thought of worked very well. Right about the time I was making the switch to Clean Eating. I read an article that suggested feeding your pets and plants before you prepare your own meals.

In other words, serve others before serving yourself.

What a great idea. After all, when I was growing up the golden rule at the dinner table was Offer the food dishes to others before taking it yourself. One summer I worked at a camp where we actually served the person to our right – I would put a piece of chicken, a spoon of broccoli, and a roll on my neighbor’s plate. Then that person would serve the person to her right, and so on…

Feeding pets and plants before meals would not only keep all the living creatures in our household on a regular schedule, it would help us transition into the intention of mindful eating. By stepping back and taking care of the needs of others first, we are reminded of how much has been given to us: our health, our bodies, and the food we are about to put inside it.

Peace & Blessings. Š

Dry Ground

And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear.” And it was so. And God saw that it was good. –Genesis 1:9

That verse has been stuck in my head since November.

Outside, I’ll point to our little community yard in front of our townhouse and say, “This hasn’t been dry since we moved in.”

It’s true.

When it’s not covered in snow or ice, it’s a wet, muddy patch of grass. I’m ready for sunshine. For warm air. For dry ground.

Last Saturday, I got my wish. The sun blazed in the sky without a cloud in sight. I was so happy and giddy and overwhelmed with possibilities I wasn’t sure what to do. Should I bike? Rollerblade? Find an outdoor court and play tennis? In the end, I opted for a long walk. I simply wanted to let the fresh air clear my mind.

Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk.

I could’ve stayed on the trail forever.

The day came to a close, and by Sunday morning it was raining again. Our patch of grass was wet and muddy. But there are more warm, dry days ahead. I can feel them. And I’m ready to welcome them with open arms.

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