Washington, DC – Career Opportunities in the Arts

Career Opportunities in the Arts

Interested in careers in the arts? The Kennedy Center’s Opening Stages Facebook Fan page is loaded with career opportunity announcements such as:

  • Internships
  • Fellowships
  • Competitions
  • Auditions
  • Grants/Funding
  • Scholarships

Opening Stages was developed to provide students and individuals with disabilities with information and resources on career development opportunities. The Fan page will highlight current disability-specific and mainstream opportunities, as well as upcoming exhibitions and performances featuring artists with disabilities.

The Kennedy Center Opening Stages fan page is open to all. Please become a fan and spread the word to anyone interested in pursuing a career in the arts.

Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences Open Auditions!

The Kennedy Center’s Theater for Young Audiences will be holding open auditions for the 2011-2012 season on the following dates:

Monday, February 7 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Equity Open Call

Sunday, February 13 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Non-Equity Open Call

The auditions will be held at the Kennedy Center located at 2700 F St. NW Washington, DC 20566. Enter through the Hall of Nations side of the building. Sign in at the Opera House Stage Door.

Preparation:

Please prepare a comedic, contemporary monologue, no longer than 2 minutes.

Actors interested in being considered for a musical production should prepare 16 bars of a standard musical theater song.

Piano accompaniment will be provided.

Please bring headshot and resume.

There will not be any appointments for these Open Call auditions.  Actors will be seen in the order in which they arrive. For questions or more information about the auditions, call or email  .

Accessibility accomodations (such as sign language interpreters) will be provided upon request. If you would like to request an accomodation, please contact the Accessibility Office at (voice/relay); (TTY) or .

ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the West Building Collection

Tours of the West Building collection are offered in American Sign Language (ASL) with voice interpretation into English on the second Sunday of each month at 1:00 PM, departing from the Rotunda on the West Building’s Main Floor. To learn more about this and other guided tours of the Gallery, please visit www.nga.gov/programs/tours .

In addition to these regularly occurring tours, sign language interpreters and guides for visitors who are blind or have low vision are available by appointment for tours of the permanent collection as well as for special exhibitions. Please call or the Gallery’s Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) at three weeks in advance for an appointment. Special headphones, which deliver full-frequency digital audio sound in a lightweight design, are available.

Printed scripts of all recorded tours are available for visitors who are deaf or hard of hearing, and free large-print brochures are available at the entrances to some of the special exhibitions. For more information, please visitwww.nga.gov/ginfo/access.shtm .

National Gallery of Art Seeking Museum Guides Fluent in ASL

The National Gallery of Art (NGA) is currently looking for experienced guides knowledgeable in art history to lead monthly tours in American Sign Language (ASL) as part of the program ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the West Building Collection. The West Building displays European and American art from the thirteenth to the early twentieth century. Masterpieces of Italian painting and sculpture, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Western Hemisphere, join works by the Dutch masters, French impressionists, and American artists.

To apply, please send a cover letter, résumé, and references to:

National Gallery of Art

Attn: Lorena Baines, DET

2000B South Club Drive

Landover, MD 20785

The application deadline is March 11, 2011.

For more information please contact Lorena Baines via e-mail at  or by phone at .

Job Opening: Technical Director

Rochester Institute of Technology

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rochester, NY

We are seeking a candidate that can teach technical theater courses in scenic, lighting and/or costume technology and serve as technical director for two productions per quarter/semester. Oversee construction, mounting, rigging, general theater maintenance, scenery, lighting, sound and costume elements of theater productions. Ensure over ad-ins, technical rehearsals, and post-production strikes. Successful candidate must be available during run of productions. This is a one-year appointment with possibility of annual renewal, contingent on performance and enrollment.

Please apply online at http://careers.rit.ed .

LOWT Auditions

Mark your calendars!  The 2011 LOWT Auditions will be held February 28 – March 2 (10 AM – 5 PM each day) at Round House Theatre in Silver Spring.

For more details visit www.lowt.org/auditions .

Thanks to John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Ham and Swiss Muffulata on Wasa

Ingredients

¼ cup green olives, pitted
¼ cup Kalamata olives, pitted
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon flat leaf Italian parsley, finely chopped
¼ teaspoon dried oregano
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon roasted red pepper, chopped
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 pieces peperocini, chopped
6 teaspoons Dijon style mustard
6 thin slices Guyere Swiss cheese
6 thin slices imported ham
6 pieces WASA Sourdough Rye Crispbread

Directions

Prepare muffuletta spread by mixing together in a small bowl green olives, Kalamata olives, olive oil, parsley, oregano, garlic, red pepper, peperocini, and lemon juice.
Spread 1 teaspoon of Dijon mustard on each crispbread followed by one slice of cheese and one slice of ham. Top with 1 tablespoon of muffuletta mixture.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 2

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 145
Total Fat 8 g
Saturated Fat 3 g
Cholesterol 24 mg
Sodium 684 mg
Total Carbohydrate 10 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Protein 10 g
Calcium 10% of daily value

Do I Knead a Bread Machine?

Bread.

The staple of life.

Now that I’ve gotten used to making my own fresh vegetable juice, I’m thinking of bread. I recall reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle a few months ago and coming across a passage by the author’s husband (Steven Hopp) who makes a fresh loaf practically everyday.

He says, “I know you’ve got one around somewhere: maybe in the closet. Or on the kitchen counter, so dusty nobody remembers it’s there. A bread machine.”

A bread machine? Nope, don’t have one in the closet or on the counter or anywhere. I’m lucky if I can find a spatula in our kitchen. During a party this spring, I was talking with the host’s mother. She’s in her late 80s and makes her own bread. I told her I wanted to learn so I could make homemade pizza dough, whole wheat, pumpernickel, etc.

“But I don’t have a bread machine,” I said.

She practically fell out of her chair laughing. I guess if you really know how to make bread the old fashioned way, you knead the dough. By hand. For a long time.

“You have to feel the dough to make sure it’s right,” she said.

Call me crazy, but kneading dough by hand actually sounds fun. I think I’ll try it (although I have no idea what it’s supposed to “feel” like, so I’ll have to wing that part). In the meantime, I’ll keep my eye out at garage sales for someone else’s barely-used, dusty bread machine.

Brown Rice Risotto

The other night I made brown rice risotto.

Well, kinda.

I ripped the recipe out of O magazine awhile ago and have been hanging onto it. The chef/writer, Colin Cowie, promised he was sharing a “labor-free” variation of the dish that usually requires a lot of stirring. Labor-free – now that’s my kind of meal.

Here’s what I did: I cooked 1 cup of brown rice in an organic free-range chicken broth. Meanwhile, I cooked mushrooms in a skillet for a few minutes (the recipe calls for an assortment of cremini, white jumbo, and shiitake, but we only had one type) and then I set the mushrooms aside. When the rice was ready, I mixed in the mushrooms. Then I mixed in 1 cup of grated parmesan cheese. I served it with a crisp greens salad. It was delicious. You can use other vegetables (asparagus) or ingredients (seafood) in place of mushrooms.

It’s one of those meals that will go into the “let’s make this again” category in my recipe box. Š

Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

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