Washington, DC – Career Opportunities in the Arts

Career Opportunities in the Arts

Interested in careers in the arts? The Kennedy Center’s Opening Stages Facebook Fan page is loaded with career opportunity announcements such as:

  • Internships
  • Fellowships
  • Competitions
  • Auditions
  • Grants/Funding
  • Scholarships

Opening Stages was developed to provide students and individuals with disabilities with information and resources on career development opportunities. The Fan page will highlight current disability-specific and mainstream opportunities, as well as upcoming exhibitions and performances featuring artists with disabilities.

The Kennedy Center Opening Stages fan page is open to all. Please become a fan and spread the word to anyone interested in pursuing a career in the arts.

Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences Open Auditions!

The Kennedy Center’s Theater for Young Audiences will be holding open auditions for the 2011-2012 season on the following dates:

Monday, February 7 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Equity Open Call

Sunday, February 13 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Non-Equity Open Call

The auditions will be held at the Kennedy Center located at 2700 F St. NW Washington, DC 20566. Enter through the Hall of Nations side of the building. Sign in at the Opera House Stage Door.

Preparation:

Please prepare a comedic, contemporary monologue, no longer than 2 minutes.

Actors interested in being considered for a musical production should prepare 16 bars of a standard musical theater song.

Piano accompaniment will be provided.

Please bring headshot and resume.

There will not be any appointments for these Open Call auditions.  Actors will be seen in the order in which they arrive. For questions or more information about the auditions, call or email  .

Accessibility accomodations (such as sign language interpreters) will be provided upon request. If you would like to request an accomodation, please contact the Accessibility Office at (voice/relay); (TTY) or .

ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the West Building Collection

Tours of the West Building collection are offered in American Sign Language (ASL) with voice interpretation into English on the second Sunday of each month at 1:00 PM, departing from the Rotunda on the West Building’s Main Floor. To learn more about this and other guided tours of the Gallery, please visit www.nga.gov/programs/tours .

In addition to these regularly occurring tours, sign language interpreters and guides for visitors who are blind or have low vision are available by appointment for tours of the permanent collection as well as for special exhibitions. Please call or the Gallery’s Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) at three weeks in advance for an appointment. Special headphones, which deliver full-frequency digital audio sound in a lightweight design, are available.

Printed scripts of all recorded tours are available for visitors who are deaf or hard of hearing, and free large-print brochures are available at the entrances to some of the special exhibitions. For more information, please visitwww.nga.gov/ginfo/access.shtm .

National Gallery of Art Seeking Museum Guides Fluent in ASL

The National Gallery of Art (NGA) is currently looking for experienced guides knowledgeable in art history to lead monthly tours in American Sign Language (ASL) as part of the program ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the West Building Collection. The West Building displays European and American art from the thirteenth to the early twentieth century. Masterpieces of Italian painting and sculpture, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Western Hemisphere, join works by the Dutch masters, French impressionists, and American artists.

To apply, please send a cover letter, résumé, and references to:

National Gallery of Art

Attn: Lorena Baines, DET

2000B South Club Drive

Landover, MD 20785

The application deadline is March 11, 2011.

For more information please contact Lorena Baines via e-mail at  or by phone at .

Job Opening: Technical Director

Rochester Institute of Technology

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rochester, NY

We are seeking a candidate that can teach technical theater courses in scenic, lighting and/or costume technology and serve as technical director for two productions per quarter/semester. Oversee construction, mounting, rigging, general theater maintenance, scenery, lighting, sound and costume elements of theater productions. Ensure over ad-ins, technical rehearsals, and post-production strikes. Successful candidate must be available during run of productions. This is a one-year appointment with possibility of annual renewal, contingent on performance and enrollment.

Please apply online at http://careers.rit.ed .

LOWT Auditions

Mark your calendars!  The 2011 LOWT Auditions will be held February 28 – March 2 (10 AM – 5 PM each day) at Round House Theatre in Silver Spring.

For more details visit www.lowt.org/auditions .

Thanks to John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Garlic Wasa

Ingredients

5 cloves garlic, crushed
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese
8 pieces WASA Multigrain Crispbread (may substitute any WASA Crispbread flavors)

Directions

Preheat oven to 350º
Add all ingredients to a small bowl and mix.
Spread 1 heaping teaspoon onto each crispbread.
Bake 5 to 7 minutes and serve warm.

Prep time: 17 minutes

Serves 8

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 186
Total Fat 11 g
Saturated Fat 1.8 g
Cholesterol 2 mg
Sodium 199 mg
Total Carbohydrate 21 g
Dietary Fiber 4 g
Protein 3 g
Calcium 35 mg

Silent Mind

My life is full of words. If I’m not writing an article, I’m writing in my journal. If I’m not blogging here, I’m blogging here. If I’m in the shower or walking the dog or cooking a meal, I’m “writing” in my head. Other times I’m reading books (more words) and magazines and newspapers.

Mostly, this is good. I love words. But I realize it’s also important to empty my mind of the 26 letters of the alphabet that are constantly buzzing around in various arrangements in my head.

We live in a world with constant noise: TV, construction, motors, whirring coffee machines – even tranquil spas and yoga classes play music. What’s that about?

Anyway, as part of my home yoga practice, I’m trying to incorporate a time to be silent. I’m not chanting a mantra (more words) or telling myself, “When this is over I need to write that thought down!”

Of course it seems our brains are always full of thought (at least my female brain is…my husband swears he’s thinking of “nothing” if I ask him. Actually, since I’m on the topic, what do babies think about? Can you have thoughts without language?)

Anyway, sitting in silence is an attempt to empty my mind…and to simply experience the quiet. A need that my bloggy friend Kathryn describes as a part of our days that is sorely missing in these times. It’s nice to invite it back into my life.Š

Chilling Out with Forward Bends

I glanced at a weather map of the United States today and it’s orange, darker orange, and red all over. In other words, it’s hot.

I tend to have a high tolerance for 90 degree weather, so I revel in it, but my yoga teacher says the heat makes a lot of people irritable.

She thought we should focus on cooling poses in class today.

We worked on variations of Downward Facing Dog – using a chair, then a wall, then the regular way – and then spent some time in Child’s Pose, Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend), and Paschimottanasana (Seated Forward Bend*).

“Forward bend poses are great for settling you down when you’re feeling agitated,” the teacher said. “You may sweat while you’re in the pose, but they’re calming on the nervous system.”

I must say, it is amazing how as the class continued I felt myself grow into silence as I streeeeeetched out, my heart resting peacefully inside.

So if you find yourself snapping at people (including yourself) or not tolerating the traffic or noticing that things that you usually don’t mind are bugging you, take heart. It might simply be the heat. Try breathing a few times . . . and don’t forget to bend.

*In Seated Forward Bend, I have to sit on two blankets and lasso a strap around the balls of my feet to hang onto and pull myself forward because I can’t reach my arms to my toes. The teacher looks just like the lady in this picture when she’s in the pose, but she mentioned that 18 years ago she had to use blankets and straps too. So. By my calculations I should be able to do Seated Forward Bend without props in 15 years. I wasn’t discouraged by this. I was excited. The human body is amazing. Anyway, I’m pretty sure you’re not supposed to think about those things in yoga class, but sometimes I can’t help it!   

Yoga Facial

I slouch too much.

At times – pecking away on my laptop, eating a meal, relaxing on the couch – I’ll catch myself and try to fix it.

Lately, I’ve noticed another habit I’ve developed over the years: frowning. Well, maybe not frowning exactly, but holding a tense face.

Opening the yoga practice, I am sitting with my legs crossed mid-shin. The teacher tells the class to close our eyes and place the back of our hands on our knees with our palms facing the ceiling. Then she tells us to relax our face.

“Relax your jaw,” she says.

“Relax the muscles around your eyes,” she continues.

“Relax the space between your brows . . . your eyelids . . . and even the skin underneath the eyelids.”

She tells the class that relaxing the face is one way to help quiet the brain.

As we continue the practice – sun salutations, standing poses, and core exercises – she gently reminds us about the muscles in our face. And every time it feels amazingly nice to relax them.Š

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