Washington, DC – Career Opportunities in the Arts

Career Opportunities in the Arts

Interested in careers in the arts? The Kennedy Center’s Opening Stages Facebook Fan page is loaded with career opportunity announcements such as:

  • Internships
  • Fellowships
  • Competitions
  • Auditions
  • Grants/Funding
  • Scholarships

Opening Stages was developed to provide students and individuals with disabilities with information and resources on career development opportunities. The Fan page will highlight current disability-specific and mainstream opportunities, as well as upcoming exhibitions and performances featuring artists with disabilities.

The Kennedy Center Opening Stages fan page is open to all. Please become a fan and spread the word to anyone interested in pursuing a career in the arts.

Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences Open Auditions!

The Kennedy Center’s Theater for Young Audiences will be holding open auditions for the 2011-2012 season on the following dates:

Monday, February 7 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Equity Open Call

Sunday, February 13 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Non-Equity Open Call

The auditions will be held at the Kennedy Center located at 2700 F St. NW Washington, DC 20566. Enter through the Hall of Nations side of the building. Sign in at the Opera House Stage Door.


Please prepare a comedic, contemporary monologue, no longer than 2 minutes.

Actors interested in being considered for a musical production should prepare 16 bars of a standard musical theater song.

Piano accompaniment will be provided.

Please bring headshot and resume.

There will not be any appointments for these Open Call auditions.  Actors will be seen in the order in which they arrive. For questions or more information about the auditions, call or email  .

Accessibility accomodations (such as sign language interpreters) will be provided upon request. If you would like to request an accomodation, please contact the Accessibility Office at (voice/relay); (TTY) or .

ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the West Building Collection

Tours of the West Building collection are offered in American Sign Language (ASL) with voice interpretation into English on the second Sunday of each month at 1:00 PM, departing from the Rotunda on the West Building’s Main Floor. To learn more about this and other guided tours of the Gallery, please visit www.nga.gov/programs/tours .

In addition to these regularly occurring tours, sign language interpreters and guides for visitors who are blind or have low vision are available by appointment for tours of the permanent collection as well as for special exhibitions. Please call or the Gallery’s Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) at three weeks in advance for an appointment. Special headphones, which deliver full-frequency digital audio sound in a lightweight design, are available.

Printed scripts of all recorded tours are available for visitors who are deaf or hard of hearing, and free large-print brochures are available at the entrances to some of the special exhibitions. For more information, please visitwww.nga.gov/ginfo/access.shtm .

National Gallery of Art Seeking Museum Guides Fluent in ASL

The National Gallery of Art (NGA) is currently looking for experienced guides knowledgeable in art history to lead monthly tours in American Sign Language (ASL) as part of the program ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the West Building Collection. The West Building displays European and American art from the thirteenth to the early twentieth century. Masterpieces of Italian painting and sculpture, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Western Hemisphere, join works by the Dutch masters, French impressionists, and American artists.

To apply, please send a cover letter, résumé, and references to:

National Gallery of Art

Attn: Lorena Baines, DET

2000B South Club Drive

Landover, MD 20785

The application deadline is March 11, 2011.

For more information please contact Lorena Baines via e-mail at  or by phone at .

Job Opening: Technical Director

Rochester Institute of Technology

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rochester, NY

We are seeking a candidate that can teach technical theater courses in scenic, lighting and/or costume technology and serve as technical director for two productions per quarter/semester. Oversee construction, mounting, rigging, general theater maintenance, scenery, lighting, sound and costume elements of theater productions. Ensure over ad-ins, technical rehearsals, and post-production strikes. Successful candidate must be available during run of productions. This is a one-year appointment with possibility of annual renewal, contingent on performance and enrollment.

Please apply online at http://careers.rit.ed .

LOWT Auditions

Mark your calendars!  The 2011 LOWT Auditions will be held February 28 – March 2 (10 AM – 5 PM each day) at Round House Theatre in Silver Spring.

For more details visit www.lowt.org/auditions .

Thanks to John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Holidays are Changing

I’m trying to talk my parents and in-laws into coming to our place for Thanksgiving.

Ever since leaving for college at age 18, I’ve traveled over the holidays.

My hubby and I are moving in early November, and we’ll hopefully be settled into our new place by Turkey Day. I’d hate to move in and then turn around and leave right away. Plus, it sounds fun to host the holidays. Of course, I’ve never cooked a Thanksgiving dinner before, but a minor detail, right? I can figure it out.

One year I asked my mom if she’d teach me to cook the turkey. I arrived at her house ready to tackle the bird and learn how to make stuffing. My grandmother was visiting too. The two of them have been taking on Thanksgiving together forever, and despite my good intentions, everyone fell into their normal roles that year. My brother helped mash the potatoes, my dad prepared to carve, I found myself setting the table, pouring the wine, and arranging the relish tray. My mom and grandmother had their own rhythm and didn’t need anyone – including me – butting in. Or maybe I simply got distracted watching whatever movies my brother had rented from the video store. Either way, I never learned how to bake a turkey. (Actually, bake or roast?)

This year will be different. My grandmother no longer travels. One of my brothers is married and will be away. I’ve pegged the local, sustainable farm where I plan to purchase Mr. Tom. (For any vegetarians, here are some recipes I stumbled across on GentleThanksgiving.org).

My parents jumped on the chance to come to my place for a change. I hope my in-laws do too.

Times are changing. Times are changing.

Part of me is nervous about altering the rhythm of our holiday, but I’m excited too.

Soul Food

It’s been raining ever since I arrived in Los Angeles. Pouring, actually. The weather reminds me of the 1997-1998 El Nino. It’s all good though. I’m here at a university working on a book project and the rain is keeping me indoors where I’m squirreled away in the library.

The last time I was out here to “work” I got a wee bit distracted and spent my days catching up with friends, visiting my old haunts, eating at my favorite places, etc. This time I’m being good.

“I picture you in a dark, dusty room all alone as you sort through archives,” my husband said to me on the phone the other day. Well, sort-of. I take the documents out of the dark, dusty room to a bigger, lighter conference room. And that’s pretty much where I’ve been the whole time – the exact same spot I was ten years ago as a grad student, typing notes on my laptop (do you ever have the feeling that you’re making no progress in life whatsoever? Anyhoo…)

Last Friday the weather channel called for rain Saturday and Sunday, so I planned to push through the weekend and continue working. But when I woke up Saturday morning, I felt sunlight on my face. I jumped up and ran to the window . . . sure enough it was a bright, shiny morning. The Pacific Ocean sparkled. I had to enjoy the sun while it lasted.

I was starving, so I gobbled down a veggie sandwich (tomato, California avocado, cucumber and sprouts on toasted whole wheat). Then I dashed to the bike path, buckled my rollerblades and – Zoom! – I was off. I bladed all the way to the end of the path, turned around and bladed back, and then turned around once again. I was like the Energizer Bunny . . . I kept going and going and going (‘cept for the part where I rounded a curve way too fast and hit an unexpected pile of sand).

It was the best. The veggie sandwich was certainly a tasty beginning to the day. But I tell ya, its sunshine that feeds my soul.

A Time to Cleanse

Don’t eat anything after 7pm.

I heard that tip on Oprah. The rationale had something to do with losing weight and the fact that it’s easier to burn calories during the day rather than at night when we’re watching TV, reading, or sitting around talking. Part of it sounded reasonable (I guess), but another part of it sounded like a silly rule or restriction that may or may not be good for a person’s particular body. After the show, I forget the tip completely and ate past 7pm a lot.

When I began Clean Eating, I started thinking about that suggestion again. Gradually, I made dinner my final meal of the day and stopped mindless snacking afterwards. My husband and I usually don’t eat until 8pm anyway, but there was another reason why I stuck to the plan: I finally understood the rationale behind Oprah’s tip. Marilyn Polk sums it up nicely in one of the cookbooks I’m reading:

“Our bodies need a chance to cleanse, heal, and rest. Most Americans are so busy poking food into their mouths throughout the day and night that their bodies do not have a chance to cleanse, heal, or rest.”

It’s like the Eagles song based on the bible verse: There is a time for everything. A time to live and a time to die. A time to plant and a time to uproot. The idea of giving my body a time eat – and then later a time to cleanse – made so much sense. Simple. Good. Common sense. And of course, it’s only a guideline. If I’m ravenous after 8pm by all means I will eat something! That makes sense too. Š

Honeymoon Phase

The work day was coming to an end. I was at my home office working on an article, and any moment I expected to hear my husband put his key in the lock and walk through the front door.

I adore this time of day.

I used to dread it, but I’m in a honeymoon phase. Dinnertime is almost here and I’m so in love with cooking.

Oh, sure, I’m thrilled to see my husband too. I enjoy hugging him and kissing him and sitting down together to talk about our days. But not that long ago, early evenings felt a little burdensome. Inevitably one of us would look at each other and ask: “So what are we going to do for dinner?”

Ugh! What a dilemma. We were usually at a loss because our cupboards were bare and besides, we were sick of the two recipes that we rotated through night after night after night after night.

Ever since we committed to making fresh, wholesome meals from scratch (or mostly scratch), our evenings have changed drastically. Our kitchen, for the first time ever, is abundant. We have fresh fruits and muffins, ingredients for homemade pizza, and spinach lasagna ready to reheat. We have a refrigerator full of red lettuce, apples, cherries, and tomatoes. Also we have a huge bowl of salsa because I’ve been on a salsa kick. (Basically, for the salsa I use the recipe from this book, combining corn, tomato, onion, pepper, carrots, black beans, parsley, garlic powder, and paprika. Then I add a little lemon juice, raw honey, and Dijon mustard for the dressing. I use it on everything – on top of mixed greens for a nice salad, as a topping to a veggie sandwich, on top of brown rice, as a dip for baked tortilla chips, etc.).

This week I’m experimenting with a variety of homemade salad dressings. When it comes to salad dressing though, my forever favorite is simply balsamic vinegar on top of baby spinach. I usually throw in pine nuts, sun dried tomatoes, goat cheese, and sautéed shitake mushrooms. The original recipe (which I copied from a menu in a restaurant whose name is slipping my mind) also called for bow tie pasta (I use tri-colored).

Tonight for dinner we’re having taco salad, and I’m going to mash up some avocados to make guacamole as a veggie dip. I’m excited about this.

People! How come no one ever told me cooking can be so fun?

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