Sign-Interpreted/Captioned “Thurgood” at the Kennedy Center

Sign-Interpreted and Captioned Events at the Kennedy Center

To purchase tickets to sign-interpreted or captioned events, call (voice/relay); (TTY).  Please visithttp://www.kennedy-center.org for more information and to find out when tickets go on sale.

Thurgood

Eisenhower Theater

Sign-Interpreted: Tuesday, June 15 & Friday, June 18 at 7:30 PM

Interpreter: Billy Sanders

Captioned: Friday, June 11 at 7:30 PM & Sunday, June 13 at 1:30 PM

“Absorbing, at times even stirring.” In Thurgood, Tony Award–winning actor Laurence Fishburne reprises his Broadway role as Thurgood Marshall, the first African American man to be appointed to the Supreme Court. In a fictional lecture on his life given by Thurgood Marshall at his alma mater, Howard University, Fishburne deftly shifts among characters, moving from Thurgood as a young and spirited man to a pensive Justice full of wisdom, and at times inhabiting the friends and foes that were met along the way.

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Skinny Female Dog

Have you read the book Skinny Female Dog yet? (That’s not the real title, but I don’t like to cuss on blogs.) I laughed my way through it with advice like “All carbs are not created equal. There are two types: simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates suck and are as nutritionally beneficial as toilet paper.” The authors’ big tip throughout the book was to “use your head” when you make choices about eating. They are proponents of no meat and no dairy. I’m of the mindset that I need a little of those food groups for a well-balanced diet (my head says there’s something not quite right about a replacing meat and dairy with soymilk, soy “cheese,” soy “meat,” etc. – BUT that’s just me. The book has some great info in there and is worth the read.)

Moving on, the point I’m trying to make is that I visited the authors’ website the other day. Watch their Video Interview. I loved it. It took one of the author’s seven years to transform her eating habits. The other one – ten years. Their message is so clear and true: the goal is to eat well and do the best you can, but no one is perfect. It’s takes time to change your diet. Taste buds need to be retrained. Moving towards healthier foods is a progression. You give up what you can and don’t beat yourself up when you eat something less than ideal.  Š

Herbs

One of my husbands charms is that if it’s my birthday, or a holiday, or some other gift-giving event, he’ll sneak in a surprise present – a little something extra that wasn’t on my list that he thought of completely on his own. For example, one year he gave me a handheld Ms. Pac-Man game because he knew I used to love Ms. Pac-Man s a kid (one time we came across the video machine in a restaurant, and I went nuts, challenging my husband to round after round until I had blisters).

So this year – after reading and observing me write the Wasa blog, and noticing my developing interest in cooking – he gave me an herb garden. Well, sort of. We don’t have real garden space in our city place, so he gave me a kit that you can assemble right on your countertop.

Mint.
Basil.
Dill.
Cilantro.
Thyme.
Parsley.
Chives.

My mom and I put together this afternoon.

We snapped a light onto the “garden” and popped in the seed pods.

“Can it really be this easy?” I said.

It was.

We added some water, feed it some nutrients, and left it to grow.

It takes about five weeks until the herbs will be ready for harvesting.

First recipe? I’m thinking a garden herb omelet.

Wasa with Poached Salmon, Basil and Tomato

Ingredients

1 filet (3.5 ounces) salmon, poached*
¼ cup sweet grape or cherry tomatoes, sliced
¼ cup thinly sliced scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon (2 to 3 leaves) fresh basil
1 teaspoon fresh oregano
1 tablespoon capers
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons olive oil
3 pieces WASA Fiber Rye crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Mix together in a large bowl, tomatoes, scallions, basil, oregano, capers, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.
Add salmon chunks and mix gently. Serve with WASA on the side of salmon mixture.

TIP: To poach salmon, place in salted, simmering water for 6-7 minutes or until salmon is opaque in center. Do not boil water. Cool and remove skin.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 416 g
Total Fat 25 g
Saturated Fat 5.3 g
Cholesterol 65 mg
Sodium 476 mg
Total Carbohydrate 29 g
Dietary Fiber 9 g
Protein 28 g
Calcium 89 g

Acorn Squash Dip with Roasted Pumpkin Seeds on Wasa

Ingredients

2 cups acorn squash, cooked
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons fat free half and half
½ cup diced onion
2 leaves fresh sage
2 teaspoons maple syrup
¼ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons roasted pumpkin seeds
1 package WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread

Directions

Slice open acorn squash and remove seeds. Place sliced side down in an 8 X 8 inch glass dish, cover and microwave on high until tender (approx 10 minutes).
Scoop out meat with a spoon when cooled and set aside.
Heat oil in a skillet. Add onion and whole sage leaves. Sauté until onions are transparent. Remove sage.
Add squash, half and half, maple syrup, and parmesan cheese. Mix well.
Spoon into bowl, sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and serve hot on a platter with crispbread.

TIP: May substitute WASA Oat, Sourdough Rye, Multigrain, or Rye Crispbread. Leftover dip may be stored in refrigerator for to 3 – 4 days.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Serves 6

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 254
Total Fat 6 g
Saturated Fat 6 g
Cholesterol 1 mg
Sodium 257 mg
Total Carbohydrate 52 g
Dietary Fiber 8 g
Protein 6 g
Calcium 57 mg

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