Sign-Interpreted and Captioned Events at the Kennedy Center

Concerts for Young People by Young People, Classical Series with Niv Ashkenazi, Emerald Quartet, and Kristina Winiarski

Millennium Stage in the Terrace Theater

Sign-Interpreted & Captioned: Wednesday, February 2 at 6:00 PM

Classical violinist Niv Ashkenazi, winner of the 2010 American Protege International Piano and Strings Competition, had his Carnegie Hall debut at the Weill Recital Hall in March 2010. Mr. Ashkenazi has won numerous competitions including the Culver City Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition. Mr. Ashkenazi was also the recipient of the 2007 VSA International Young Soloists Award.

Concerts for Young People by Young People, Non-Classical Series with The Ransom Notes, Leo Manzari, and Amy K. Bormer

Millennium Stage in the Terrace Theater

Sign-Interpreted & Captioned: Friday, February 4 at 6:00 PM

The Ransom Notes, a group of talented young musicians from Denver blend Classical, Celtic, Bluegrass, and Gospel music in a way like no other. At 22, Amanda plays violin/fiddle, mandolin, guitar and provides vocals for the group. Michael is 18 and primarily plays the cello (an instrument unique to the world of bluegrass music), as well as a little mandolin, and also adds his fair share of vocals to each performance. The youngest member of the trio, 16 year old Amelia, plays violin/fiddle, mandolin, guitar, and a host of other instruments. They recently performed on Capitol Hill as part of the 2010 International VSA Festival.

Scott MacIntyre

Millennium Stage

Sign-Interpreted & Captioned: Saturday, February 5 at 6:00 PM

Since captivating the nation as a finalist on Season 8 of American Idol, singer-songwriter Scott MacIntyre, a 2008 VSA International Young Soloist Award recipient, has continued his successful career trajectory.

Druid: The Cripple of Inishmaan

Eisenhower Theater

Captioned: Friday, February 11 at 7:30 PM

Famed Irish theater company Druid and New York’s Atlantic Theatre present The Cripple of Inishmaan, written by Academy Award winner Martin McDonagh and directed by Tony Award winner Garry Hynes, the first woman to win a Tony Award for Best Direction. Set in rural Ireland in 1934, this dark comedy depicts the impact that a Hollywood film crew has over the local residents when it shows up to document the tiny island of Inishmore. When a young, orphaned “cripple” named Billy Claven is selected for a part in the film, his dreams of escape take flight.

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

Acorn Squash Dip with Roasted Pumpkin Seeds on Wasa

Ingredients

2 cups acorn squash, cooked
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons fat free half and half
½ cup diced onion
2 leaves fresh sage
2 teaspoons maple syrup
¼ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons roasted pumpkin seeds
1 package WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread

Directions

Slice open acorn squash and remove seeds. Place sliced side down in an 8 X 8 inch glass dish, cover and microwave on high until tender (approx 10 minutes).
Scoop out meat with a spoon when cooled and set aside.
Heat oil in a skillet. Add onion and whole sage leaves. Sauté until onions are transparent. Remove sage.
Add squash, half and half, maple syrup, and parmesan cheese. Mix well.
Spoon into bowl, sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and serve hot on a platter with crispbread.

TIP: May substitute WASA Oat, Sourdough Rye, Multigrain, or Rye Crispbread. Leftover dip may be stored in refrigerator for to 3 – 4 days.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Serves 6

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 254
Total Fat 6 g
Saturated Fat 6 g
Cholesterol 1 mg
Sodium 257 mg
Total Carbohydrate 52 g
Dietary Fiber 8 g
Protein 6 g
Calcium 57 mg

Buy Lasix to Get Rid of Edema

Edema is a medical condition wherein the body suffers from certain fluid buildup.  This buildup occurs due to a variety of medical conditions.  Normally, this occurs when there is too much water being dumped that the lymphatic system, the one responsible for the draining of excess water, becomes unable to cope up with the volume of water that needs to be drained.  Another reason is that the lymphatic system or part of it is no longer functioning properly.  When any of these two happens, edema or fluid buildup occurs.  To stop such buildup, you need to buy Lasix as treatment. Read more…

Freedom

I was “birthed” into the world of yoga through the Iyengar style where precision and alignment are emphasized. My teacher would adjust our poses starting from our pinky toe (literally – she’d have us lift it up and try to spread it away from our other toes) all the way to the tops of our heads (which, she would tell us, should be lifting toward the ceiling, as if a string was attached to our scalp and someone was pulling).

I’m one of those follow the rules, read the directions, life is in the details type of girls, so I ate Iyengar yoga up. The fact that my hamstrings are tight, my shoulders are scrunched, and my hips are narrow make Iyengar a fitting practice because I benefit so greatly from the blocks and straps and blankets that are generously encouraged in that style of practice to help with proper positioning.

From time to time I’ve experimented with other yoga styles – this article describes various kinds – and recently I found myself in a session where the teacher was leading a flow with pretty much no regard to form whatsoever.

At first I was distraught.

“Beautiful!” the yoga teacher said when I moved into Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II).

“Oh, yeah, right,” I thought to myself.

In an Iyengar class, the instructor is always adjusting my Warrior II pose. I’m like a toy where you push one section in and another section pops out. If she moves my left thigh, my right knee tweaks to a different place. If she tilts my pelvis, my arms plummet. If she tells me where to fix my gaze – whoops – there goes my thigh again.

Anyway, I realized pretty quickly that I didn’t want to spend the entire practice mentally upset that this yoga teacher wasn’t going to focus on form. Other than calling out the pose, she was giving no instructions, and deep inside I knew that was okay. Because yoga really isn’t about form. Not at its core. It’s about being in a present state of mind. Finding a place where I’m not worrying about the future or obsessing over the past, even if those thoughts relate to yoga itself. As I continued the flow, I let go of the details and the precision and simply enjoyed the movement.

I felt warm and flexible and free.

Category Specific RSS

Archives

Tags