Next Coventry Deaf Gathering will be Monday, May 20 — 6:30-7:30pm


Hello! Please join us

for Coventry Library’s next Deaf Gathering!


Monday, May 20,

6:30-7:30pm

 

Are you Deaf

or Hard-of-Hearing?

Are you hearing and interested in learning more about Deaf Culture?

Come gather at the Coventry Village Library!

1925 Coventry Rd.

Cleveland Heights, OH 44118

An Interpreter will be provided.

Leave a Reply

You must be to post a comment.

Do I Knead a Bread Machine?

Bread.

The staple of life.

Now that I’ve gotten used to making my own fresh vegetable juice, I’m thinking of bread. I recall reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle a few months ago and coming across a passage by the author’s husband (Steven Hopp) who makes a fresh loaf practically everyday.

He says, “I know you’ve got one around somewhere: maybe in the closet. Or on the kitchen counter, so dusty nobody remembers it’s there. A bread machine.”

A bread machine? Nope, don’t have one in the closet or on the counter or anywhere. I’m lucky if I can find a spatula in our kitchen. During a party this spring, I was talking with the host’s mother. She’s in her late 80s and makes her own bread. I told her I wanted to learn so I could make homemade pizza dough, whole wheat, pumpernickel, etc.

“But I don’t have a bread machine,” I said.

She practically fell out of her chair laughing. I guess if you really know how to make bread the old fashioned way, you knead the dough. By hand. For a long time.

“You have to feel the dough to make sure it’s right,” she said.

Call me crazy, but kneading dough by hand actually sounds fun. I think I’ll try it (although I have no idea what it’s supposed to “feel” like, so I’ll have to wing that part). In the meantime, I’ll keep my eye out at garage sales for someone else’s barely-used, dusty bread machine.

Poetry

It’s not often I’m in a yoga class where the teacher gives a reading during closing. But those rare times when that has been the case — well, I’ve adored it. I love words. Language. Poetry. Here’s the quote my yoga teacher read the other day:

Even after all this time
the sun never says to the earth
you owe me.
Look what happens to a love
like that – it lights the whole sky.
– Hafiz

Wasa with Poached Salmon, Basil and Tomato

Ingredients

1 filet (3.5 ounces) salmon, poached*
¼ cup sweet grape or cherry tomatoes, sliced
¼ cup thinly sliced scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon (2 to 3 leaves) fresh basil
1 teaspoon fresh oregano
1 tablespoon capers
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons olive oil
3 pieces WASA Fiber Rye crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Mix together in a large bowl, tomatoes, scallions, basil, oregano, capers, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.
Add salmon chunks and mix gently. Serve with WASA on the side of salmon mixture.

TIP: To poach salmon, place in salted, simmering water for 6-7 minutes or until salmon is opaque in center. Do not boil water. Cool and remove skin.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 416 g
Total Fat 25 g
Saturated Fat 5.3 g
Cholesterol 65 mg
Sodium 476 mg
Total Carbohydrate 29 g
Dietary Fiber 9 g
Protein 28 g
Calcium 89 g

Drishti

“Find a point on the ground about a foot in front of your mat and softly fix your gaze on it.”

I’ve heard that instruction tons of times in various yoga classes (depending on the pose, the point of focus changes). It helps me with balance poses, like Tree pose. The other day in class, the teacher was giving that same instruction. Softly is the key word. It’s not an intense stare. “It’s almost like you’re looking behind your eyes,” she said. “It’s called Drishti.”

I never knew it had a name before.

Category Specific RSS

Archives

Tags