Deaf Film Series

Hello everyone!

 

Please join us at the Coventry Village Library in Cleveland Heights for our ongoing Deaf Film Series. Our next showing will be:

Thursday, February 2nd at 6:45pm.

 

            We will be showing:

“The Heart of The Hydrogen Jukebox.”

The Heart of the Hydrogen Jukebox is a documentary film by Miriam Nathan with Don Feigel that traces the evolution of American Sign Language (ASL) poetry. Interviews and archival footage from the 1970’s, 80’s, and 90’s reveal how Deaf poets broke away from the constraints of English form to discover how the unique grammar and startling visual clarity of ASL could become a distinct poetics form all its own. One segment, from which the film’s title is derived, shows an historic 1984 meeting between Deaf poets and Allen Ginsberg which culminated in an “ah ha!” moment for ASL artists in the room.”

 

 

Come and enjoy this excellant film and share some refreshments and good company!

 

Ben Gulyas

Adult Services Reference Librarian

Deaf Services Coordinator

Coventry Village Library

1925 Coventry Road, Cleveland Hts., OH 44118

V:  TTY:

   www.heightslibrary.org

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Broccoli

Broccoli. Used to like it as a kid. Then one day I ate it and threw-up later that night. Haven’t touched it since. We’re talking 19 years of no broccoli. That’ too bad considering it’s one of the best vegetables out there – packed with nutrients, fiber, and cancer-fighting antioxidants.

As I continue to adjust my eating habits, I am always looking for new ways to add vegetables into my diet. Broccoli is one vegetable my husband loves, so I usually steam a little bit for him and make something different for myself – spinach, green beans, whatever. But the other night I was boiling some Barilla whole grain pasta. I drained the noodles and poured some organic pasta sauce over the top.

As I was scooping out the broccoli for my husband’s plate, I decided to mix some of the florets in with the pasta and red sauce. Yum. I love broccoli again. But only this way. I’m the same way with asparagus. Can’t really stand the stuff plain (unless of course it’s picked fresh from my own garden), but I will eat it in an omelet. Go figure. Š

Walking Barefoot

I’m at the BlogHer conference in downtown Chicago mingling with 800 other women (promise I’ll link to some great food and yoga blogs once I process all the info that’s pouring into my brain).

The first day, I decided to get some exercise by walking from the train station to the conference center. I was wearing sandals and carrying a heavy laptop bag. I got lost. One hour and five blisters later, I finally arrived. I was smart enough to take a cab back to the train station that night, but once I made it to the suburbs (where I’m staying with a friend) I had to walk another mile to their house. My friend’s husband, Brad, was with me, and he watched as I limped and cringed.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said as my sandals rubbed against my blisters.

I slipped off my shoes.

“Ow, ow, ow,” I said again as the sharp little pebbles on the roads and sidewalks cut my feet.

“You’re a yoga blogger!” Brad said.

“What does that have to do with anything?” I asked.

“Some yogis walk over hot coals and stuff,” he pointed out.

Now that he mentioned it, I did recall reading a passage in a book about firewalking at a yoga retreat. Although none of the yoga classes I’ve attended have involved hot coals, we do practice in bare feet. Still, smooth wood floors and soft sticky mats may help strengthen my soul, but they don’t sturdy up the skin on my soles.

Walking home that night, I stepped off the sidewalk and onto the grass. It was long and cool and damp. It cushioned my bare feet and brushed in between my toes. I completely forgot about my blisters as I focused on how nice it felt to observe the world through from the bottom up. It had been a long time since I’ve walked barefoot in the grass.

To some, barefoot hiking is a hobby. Richard Frazine wrote a book about it called The Barefoot Hiker, and Common Ground, a sustainable living magazine, wrote an article about it here.

How often do we take time to feel the crunch of leaves or the slick slime of moss or the powder puffs of dirt through our feet and toes? Not to mention walking barefoot is gentle on the planet. I think I will start taking off my shoes more often, especially outside.

As quoted on this website, Sitting Bull said:  “Healthy feet can hear the very heart of Mother Earth.”

Wilted Spinach Salad with Raisins, Pine Nuts, and Walnuts

Ingredients

1 tablespoon raisins
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon pine nuts
½ bag (4.5 ounces) fresh baby spinach
1 clove garlic, crushed
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 pieces WASA Fiber Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA Variety)

Directions

Soak raisins in a small bowl with boiling water for 10 minutes. Drain and set aside.
Heat olive oil in a 12 inch skillet. Add pine nuts, garlic and sauté until garlic turns yellow.
Add spinach and cook for 2 to 3 minutes until spinach is slightly wilted. Add raisins and toss.
Serve on platter with WASA on side or crumble WASA crispbread into salad.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 250
Total Fat 18 g
Saturated Fat 1.8 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 253 mg
Total Carbohydrate 23 g
Dietary Fiber 16 g
Protein 7 g
Calcium 109

Generic Medications like Finasteride are Equally Effective as their Branded Cousins

When it comes to generic medications, most people usually view them as low grade alternatives that are intended only for the impoverished.  Sadly, this is somewhat true for a lot of generic medications as some manufacturers try to cut cost on certain aspects of their generic products so as to increase or better their profits.  However, this is not always the case with generic medications.  Personally, when it comes to generic medicines, I try to see if the effect of the drug is visible or not, even if the result is only noticeable after a few months.  Take for instance finasteride generic, the generic form of the hair loss treatment drug Propecia.

Finasteride generic is actually the best alternative to the drug Propecia for those who are looking to save money.  Let’s make it clear, finasteride generic is not for the impoverished, but for those that want to save money.  Since this form of hair loss treatment needs to be taken on a daily basis and continuously throughout, it can really cost the user a lot of money if he continuously take the branded medication.  Fortunately, generic treatment drugs like finasteride generic exists that have virtually the same effect as its branded cousin.  Basically, finasteride generic are equally as effective as Propecia.

Propecia is a hair loss treatment drug that was developed and released by Merck.  However, when their royalty over the drug has expired, it allowed generic drug manufacturers to reproduce the drug.  For this reason, finasteride generic is made using the exact same ingredients that Merck uses to produce their male pattern baldness treatment drug, Propecia.  Perhaps the only differences that finasteride generic has over its branded cousin are the manufacturing process and quality assurance.  Nevertheless, finasteride generic is simply as effective as Propecia. Read more…

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