SAVE THE DATE!!


– ASL-Interpreted Shabbat Morning Services (January 15th)

New York’s Tifereth Israel-Town & Village (T&V) Synagogue (www.tandv.org)
will be hosting another sign-language-interpreted Shabbat Service on Saturday
morning, January 15th (Martin Luther King, Jr. Weekend — also our first of
many in 2011), and we hope you can join us!

The Service will include full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets),
and will be held from 10:00 AM — 12:30 PM at 334 East 14th Street, between
1st and 2nd Avenues in Manhattan.  Our interpreting team will again include
Naomi Brunnlehrman and Jessica Ames, and their work will be underwritten
thanks to UJA-Federation of New York’s Jewish Community Deaf Interpreter
Fund.

A Kiddush (refreshments and social hour) will follow Services, and all are
welcome to participate!

(Please note: Out of respect for Shabbat, pen, paper and cell phones cannot be
used at T&V on Saturday morning.)

For additional information, please contact Bram Weiser at
or (212) 677-0368v.

Thanks, and we’ll hope to see you there!

(Schedule is subject to change.)

P.S.  Purim (yes, Purim) will be here faster than you think…Saturday
evening, March 19th at T&V.  Details are coming soon…so don’t miss out!

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Holidays are Changing

I’m trying to talk my parents and in-laws into coming to our place for Thanksgiving.

Ever since leaving for college at age 18, I’ve traveled over the holidays.

My hubby and I are moving in early November, and we’ll hopefully be settled into our new place by Turkey Day. I’d hate to move in and then turn around and leave right away. Plus, it sounds fun to host the holidays. Of course, I’ve never cooked a Thanksgiving dinner before, but a minor detail, right? I can figure it out.

One year I asked my mom if she’d teach me to cook the turkey. I arrived at her house ready to tackle the bird and learn how to make stuffing. My grandmother was visiting too. The two of them have been taking on Thanksgiving together forever, and despite my good intentions, everyone fell into their normal roles that year. My brother helped mash the potatoes, my dad prepared to carve, I found myself setting the table, pouring the wine, and arranging the relish tray. My mom and grandmother had their own rhythm and didn’t need anyone – including me – butting in. Or maybe I simply got distracted watching whatever movies my brother had rented from the video store. Either way, I never learned how to bake a turkey. (Actually, bake or roast?)

This year will be different. My grandmother no longer travels. One of my brothers is married and will be away. I’ve pegged the local, sustainable farm where I plan to purchase Mr. Tom. (For any vegetarians, here are some recipes I stumbled across on GentleThanksgiving.org).

My parents jumped on the chance to come to my place for a change. I hope my in-laws do too.

Times are changing. Times are changing.

Part of me is nervous about altering the rhythm of our holiday, but I’m excited too.

Ham and Swiss Muffulata on Wasa

Ingredients

¼ cup green olives, pitted
¼ cup Kalamata olives, pitted
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon flat leaf Italian parsley, finely chopped
¼ teaspoon dried oregano
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon roasted red pepper, chopped
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 pieces peperocini, chopped
6 teaspoons Dijon style mustard
6 thin slices Guyere Swiss cheese
6 thin slices imported ham
6 pieces WASA Sourdough Rye Crispbread

Directions

Prepare muffuletta spread by mixing together in a small bowl green olives, Kalamata olives, olive oil, parsley, oregano, garlic, red pepper, peperocini, and lemon juice.
Spread 1 teaspoon of Dijon mustard on each crispbread followed by one slice of cheese and one slice of ham. Top with 1 tablespoon of muffuletta mixture.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 2

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 145
Total Fat 8 g
Saturated Fat 3 g
Cholesterol 24 mg
Sodium 684 mg
Total Carbohydrate 10 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Protein 10 g
Calcium 10% of daily value

Freedom

I was “birthed” into the world of yoga through the Iyengar style where precision and alignment are emphasized. My teacher would adjust our poses starting from our pinky toe (literally – she’d have us lift it up and try to spread it away from our other toes) all the way to the tops of our heads (which, she would tell us, should be lifting toward the ceiling, as if a string was attached to our scalp and someone was pulling).

I’m one of those follow the rules, read the directions, life is in the details type of girls, so I ate Iyengar yoga up. The fact that my hamstrings are tight, my shoulders are scrunched, and my hips are narrow make Iyengar a fitting practice because I benefit so greatly from the blocks and straps and blankets that are generously encouraged in that style of practice to help with proper positioning.

From time to time I’ve experimented with other yoga styles – this article describes various kinds – and recently I found myself in a session where the teacher was leading a flow with pretty much no regard to form whatsoever.

At first I was distraught.

“Beautiful!” the yoga teacher said when I moved into Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II).

“Oh, yeah, right,” I thought to myself.

In an Iyengar class, the instructor is always adjusting my Warrior II pose. I’m like a toy where you push one section in and another section pops out. If she moves my left thigh, my right knee tweaks to a different place. If she tilts my pelvis, my arms plummet. If she tells me where to fix my gaze – whoops – there goes my thigh again.

Anyway, I realized pretty quickly that I didn’t want to spend the entire practice mentally upset that this yoga teacher wasn’t going to focus on form. Other than calling out the pose, she was giving no instructions, and deep inside I knew that was okay. Because yoga really isn’t about form. Not at its core. It’s about being in a present state of mind. Finding a place where I’m not worrying about the future or obsessing over the past, even if those thoughts relate to yoga itself. As I continued the flow, I let go of the details and the precision and simply enjoyed the movement.

I felt warm and flexible and free.

Got ED? Solve it Using Tadalafil

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is not really uncommon as it seems because it is said that one in five men will experience it under varying severity.  This literally means that 20% of the male population will have some sort of erectile dysfunction.  If you are included among those 20%, you can call yourself very unfortunate because the condition deprives you of having a normal sex life.  Nevertheless, you can still consider yourself very fortunate, even if you have ED, because you now live in an age where the condition can be temporarily treated so you can fulfill not just your sexual needs, but the sexual needs of your partner as well.

There are different types of medications used in treating ED, such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil, avanafil, and tadalafil.  However, even though they are different, all of them are classified as PDE5 inhibitor drugs.  What this means is that even if these ED drugs have different active ingredients, their main course of action is still the same and that is the relaxing of the smooth muscles covering the penis to make blood be pumped effectively into the cavity within the penis in order to achieve an erection. Read more…

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