Director Catholic Deaf Community


Hi,
Please get the word out…as I’m still hoping for a Deaf Director! :-)

The Diocese is working slowly on the “real” position description.
To move it along, Rosemary Smith, Human Resources, told me that I could
send out
this one and ask that anyone interested to send her a resume.

Her address:
Rosemary Smith
Manager of Benefits and Compensation
Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse
240 E. Onondaga Street
Syracuse, New York 13202

Office:
Fax:

I’m praying it will be filled fast! :-)
Thanks.
MM

Mary Margaret Van Damme, Director
Catholic Deaf Community of the Syracuse Diocese
http://syrdeaf.awardspace.info/

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Mix it Up

Staying at our retreat home in the mountains of Colorado has me thinking about water. I constantly see large vehicles with oversized plastic containers strapped into their truck beds, full of water. Water is hauled all over the place. It’s dry out here.

I’ve actually become a bit paranoid about water. What is the healthiest way to drink it? Should I gulp tap water and risk consuming substances like chlorine and fluoride, not to mention whatever else the water might be picking up as it flows through the pipes? Or should I buy water in a bottle and risk consuming leeched chemicals from the plastic, not to mention hurting the environment (plastic water bottles take 1000 years to biodegrade)? And if I do opt for store bought water, what should I purchase? Spring? Distilled? Glacial?

The more I read about water, the more confusing the facts. I find this to be the case with fish too (Eat it – it’s good for you! Don’t eat it – tuna contains mercury, fish handlers get infections when capturing rockfish, etc.!)

Here’s my current theory: instead of devoting myself to one type of water (tap, spring, well) I mix it up. That way, I figure I’ll get a variety of chemicals but (hopefully) in miniscule amounts. I take the same approach with fish. I’ll eat tuna on occasion, but not too often. Same with salmon and shrimp and sole. So that’s my theory and I’m stickin’ to it.  Š

Napping Yoga

After a couple of weeks away from yoga, I wanted to ease back into the practice. So I went to a restorative class this morning. It was a new studio, and I wandered back to the office to sign in as “Drop In.”

“I’m a drop in too,” I heard another woman say. “This is restorative yoga, right?” the woman continued. “The kind where you lay around and rest?”

The yoga instructor smiled. “Yes. I call it napping yoga.”

It’s a fitting name because it’s so deeply relaxing. Today, we opened with a few side stretches and twists. The rest of the class we spent in Reclining Bound Angle Pose, Seated Forward Bend, Waterfall, and Savasana.

It was heavenly

My Kind of Yogi

My car crunches over the gravel as I pull into the parking lot of the yoga studio. Climbing up the rickety stairs of the wood building, I’m filled with hope.

This is the ninth yoga instructor I’ve tried since moving to DC. For whatever reason, I can’t seem to find a teacher that feels like the right fit. In part, I’m grieving the loss of my instructor from Los Angeles whom I adored. And I admit I don’t mind the teachers I’ve practiced with here, but I find yoga easier to maintain when I feel a strong authentic connection.

A few months ago I tried a class where the teacher did seem like a great fit. But when I returned, she was no longer there. I scoured the web searching for her to pop up in another studio around town. I only had a first name to go off of, but I think I might have found her and that’s why I’m here today.

I sign in at the desk and walk into the studio. The teacher is asking the class to get two blocks, a blanket, and a strap. Yep, that’s her. I can tell by the sound of her voice.

She walks by me on her way to close the door of the studio, but she pauses before reaching her destination. She watches me as I pull back my hair back into a loose ponytail.

“Hi. I’m Jenny. I’m a drop-in,” I say.

“I know you,” she says.

I sigh in relief. She remembers me.

“I took a restorative yoga class you taught in another studio a few months ago. I’ve been looking for you ever since. You’re hard to find,” I explain.

“Yes,” she nods, remembering the class. “It’s taken me awhile to get going and figure out where to set up shop.”

Well no wonder I couldn’t find her. She’s a new teacher. Later, I discover that she had a health scare which caused her to re-evaluate her entire career as a molecular biologist. Once she recovered, she decided to become a yoga teacher. Love that (I had a similar experience three years ago and that’s when I began writing).

We open by chanting three Oms. Then she tells us to be sure not to miss class three weeks from now. She’ll be teaching it outside where we will all face the trees so we can experience a “yoga foliage festival.” Oh yeah, she’s my kind of yogi. Š

Can I Buy Diflucan Over The Counter?

Over the counter medicines are drugs that can be sold directly to patients having a valid prescription from a doctor or any healthcare professionals. The reason why some drugs are not allowed to be sold directly to consumers over the counter is to make sure that these drugs will only be given to the right patients with the right illness. Some people may think that they already know everything about drugs, or some might think that  some drugs intended for a specific illness that have been prescribed to someone they know, would still be applicable to them; but that kind of thinking should never be pursued.

All drugs have different formulation and ingredients. Some may contain harmful or poisonous ingredients, some might cause drug addiction that could be used for wrong doings, and some drugs might contain an ingredient that can make a person allergic. These are the reasons why not all drugs are sold directly over the counter. Over the counter drugs are regulated by selected regulatory agencies which checks the drug whether it is safe to be taken by common consumers.

Fungal infections are common illness acquired by people and are mainly caused by bacterial infections. To treat these fungal diseases, antifungal agents should be taken just like Fluconazole or Diflucan. The thing about this medicine (Diflucan) is that it is a broad spectrum antifungal agent; it means that it kills a wide range of bacteria. Diflucan are available in tablets and IV (Intravenous injection). Diflucan is used to treat candidal infections caused by the Candida bacteria, urinary tract infections, peritonitis, and pneumonia. Read more…

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