ASL-only Tours at the Jewish Museum (Jun3,17)


ASL-only Tours at the Jewish Museum (Jun3,17)

In a special addition, NYC’s Jewish Museum will be offering ASL-only tours in
June led by some of New York’s finest Deaf docents, and you can be there,
too!


* Emmanuel von Schack will lead a tour of “Jack Goldstein x 10,000″ on Monday,
June 3rd, from 2:00-4:00pm

* Alexandria Wailes will lead a tour of “As it were… So to speak: A Museum
Collection in Dialogue with Barbara Bloom” on Monday, June 17th, from
2:00-4:00pm

Each tour will be followed by light refreshments with museum staff.

IMPORTANT: Voice interpretation will NOT be provided for the
signing-impaired…

Additional information can be found at
http://www.thejewishmuseum.org/SignInterpretedTours.

To register, please call or email .  Programs are
free but require advance reservations.

Hope you can join us!!

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Wasa with Zucchini, Cherry Tomato, and Goat Cheese

Ingredients

¼ cup cherry or grape tomatoes, sliced
1 small zucchini, sliced thin lengthwise
2 tablespoons goat cheese
2 pieces WASA Hearty Rye (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Sauté zucchini in a non-stick skillet until soft and golden in color.
Spread 1 tablespoon goat cheese on each crispbread.
Top with sliced tomatoes and layer zucchini on top.

TIP: Substitute eggplant or yellow squash for zucchini.

Prep time: 5 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 205
Total Fat 6 g
Saturated Fat 4 g
Cholesterol 15 mg
Sodium 260 mg
Total Carbohydrate 34 g
Dietary Fiber 7 g
Protein 9 g
Calcium 94 mg

Vardenafil HCL — Your Effective Medication for Impotency

Impotency is just one of the many challenges a man could experience, and if you happen to acquire this symptom, then you have just landed on the right page. Although there are many drugs available in the market these days for treating erection difficulties, you can find Vardenafil HCL 20mg medication as one of the most prescribed drugs by your doctor.

Vardenafil basically works by pumping more blood supply towards the male organ to help stimulate sexual drive. However, the drug does not guarantee you a lifetime treatment – ED is incurable and the drugs available such as Vardenafil are only instruments to improve sexual performance. Of course, you have to be sexually aroused to appreciate the results of this medication.

How to take Vardenafil

Take this medication by swallowing the tablet immediately – don’t break, split, crush, or chew the tablet. You can also take this drug with your regular meals, or even without food. Vardenafil should work 60 minutes after the medicine has been ingested.
Doctors may recommend you the appropriate dosage as well as the proper interval of time in taking your medications. Follow the prescriptions sincerely and read the labels so you will have information about how the drug should work. Never attempt to go beyond the prescription or taking the drug more often than what is recommended; otherwise, the possible side effects will be magnified and you will likely experience the negative symptoms. Read more…

Healing Waters

I sink into the water.

Outside, at the hot springs, the air is cool and river still. It smells like sulfur, but after a few minutes I don’t notice. I’m simply lost in the “healing waters.” That’s what they are called because supposedly the minerals in the hot springs help with a number of ailments. Personally, I enjoy the way the heat releases the tension in my body. I especially like soaking my feet – they cramp easily. I also like the heat around the middle of my body – a source of pain between a miscarriage, a surgery, and fertility frustrations over the past 12 months.

I lean back against the stone wall of the bath and watch.

There is a man standing under a waterfall. The water thuds against his back. What is he healing? Tight shoulders? Work stress? Or something deeper . . . the loss of a family member or friend?

In another pool there is a woman with her eyes closed. Maybe she is washing away the pain of divorce. Or abuse. Or a dog named Marley.

I don’t know. I’m just guessing. But when I start thinking about all the different types of “loss” people deal with, it’s clear we all need healing. One of the professors at the university I attended in Southern California just lost his house in the fires. One of my friends just gave birth, a joyful event . . . and a loss of personal time.

Loss of age . . . loss of a job . . . loss of a breast . . . loss of mental agility . . . loss of a city after a move . . . loss of a child who goes off to college . . . and on and on and on it goes.

I read a paragraph in a book the other day about the importance of taking time to heal. The author said that when we step back and heal ourselves we become aware of a world full of people in need. My time of retreat is coming to a close. I hope I don’t go back home and get too wrapped up in schedules and deadlines and the frustrations of city traffic. I hope I can heed the author’s advice and help heal the world in little personal ways. Š

A Time to Feast

I’m hanging out with my parents when my dad sees me frantically rubbing my thumbs against the palms of my hands.

“Are you nervous?” he asks.

“Yeah,” I say.

He wants to know why. How to explain?

My parents have been visiting the past few days. I haven’t seen them in over six months. It’s the longest period of time we’ve ever been apart (even when I lived in Europe after college I saw them at least every four months). The past few days have been one big party. We’ve eaten red meat and fried foods. We’ve had Grasshoppers (ice cream and alcohol) and cookies. I think I munched on a vegetable in there somewhere – yes, I steamed spinach one night – but other than that, I can’t say I’ve been practicing “mindful eating” since Saturday. And my home yoga regime? Completely cut off once my parents arrived (although my mom saw my mat, which was rolled out on the floor, and she practiced sun salutations).

“I’m not sure what to blog about for Wasa this week,” I finally say to my dad.

“Well, let’s think,” he says.

“I’m supposed to blog about yoga and mindful eating, but I’m not inspired given my eating habits and lack of yoga practice,” I explain.

My dad is silent for awhile. “You could talk about how yoga is important for old people like me,” he finally says. “As people age, they are at an increased risk of falling. So write in your blog that yoga is important for balance and to do yoga with a Wasa cracker.”

“Uh, okay. Thanks,” I say.

“Just trying to help,” he says.

My mom chimes in too. “Oh, I know,” she says. “Blog about the fact that we bought a juicer.”

It’s true. My parents read the Wasa blog and were inspired to buy a juicer.

“Last week we made peach juice with vodka,” my mom says. “It was delicious!” She pauses. “Am I missing the point?”

Well, I do wish they would make vegetable juice instead, but maybe I’m the one who is missing the point. As I drop them off at the airport, I know what I’m going to blog about: A Time to Feast. This week we’ve hit up good restaurants and had fun cooking in too. We played cards and watched baseball and talked, all over scones for breakfast and steaks for dinner. It was a reunion. A celebration.  A time to enjoy life. Not that we couldn’t have done that over Brussels sprouts and brown rice, but eating well most of the time makes it easier to allow the exceptions. Not to mention, those “exceptions” are much appreciated.

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