2nd Community-led Friday Eve Shabbat Learner’s Service / Havurah


**********
BY POPULAR DEMAND…WE’RE DOING IT AGAIN!!

The Jewish Deaf Resource Center, Inc. (JDRC)
and Congregation Rodeph Sholom
invite you to please join us for a

COMMUNITY LED FRIDAY EVE SHABBAT
LEARNER’S SERVICE / HAVURAH


in American Sign Language
with the prayerbook projected
on a screen

When? June 21st, 6:00-7:15pm, followed by a Special Oneg

Where? Congregation Rodeph Sholom, 7 W 83rd St, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10024

If you are interested in leading a prayer, please let us know!  We will helpall interested attendees prepare beforehand.

RSVP to
Jessica Ames:
or

There will be no formal voice interpretation of this service. It is intended for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community, hearing signers and those otherwise able to visually follow along.

Please also look at our flyer on Rodeph Sholom’s Website:  http://rodephsholom.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/asl-service_flyer.pdf

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Broccoli

Broccoli. Used to like it as a kid. Then one day I ate it and threw-up later that night. Haven’t touched it since. We’re talking 19 years of no broccoli. That’ too bad considering it’s one of the best vegetables out there – packed with nutrients, fiber, and cancer-fighting antioxidants.

As I continue to adjust my eating habits, I am always looking for new ways to add vegetables into my diet. Broccoli is one vegetable my husband loves, so I usually steam a little bit for him and make something different for myself – spinach, green beans, whatever. But the other night I was boiling some Barilla whole grain pasta. I drained the noodles and poured some organic pasta sauce over the top.

As I was scooping out the broccoli for my husband’s plate, I decided to mix some of the florets in with the pasta and red sauce. Yum. I love broccoli again. But only this way. I’m the same way with asparagus. Can’t really stand the stuff plain (unless of course it’s picked fresh from my own garden), but I will eat it in an omelet. Go figure. Š

Healing Waters

I sink into the water.

Outside, at the hot springs, the air is cool and river still. It smells like sulfur, but after a few minutes I don’t notice. I’m simply lost in the “healing waters.” That’s what they are called because supposedly the minerals in the hot springs help with a number of ailments. Personally, I enjoy the way the heat releases the tension in my body. I especially like soaking my feet – they cramp easily. I also like the heat around the middle of my body – a source of pain between a miscarriage, a surgery, and fertility frustrations over the past 12 months.

I lean back against the stone wall of the bath and watch.

There is a man standing under a waterfall. The water thuds against his back. What is he healing? Tight shoulders? Work stress? Or something deeper . . . the loss of a family member or friend?

In another pool there is a woman with her eyes closed. Maybe she is washing away the pain of divorce. Or abuse. Or a dog named Marley.

I don’t know. I’m just guessing. But when I start thinking about all the different types of “loss” people deal with, it’s clear we all need healing. One of the professors at the university I attended in Southern California just lost his house in the fires. One of my friends just gave birth, a joyful event . . . and a loss of personal time.

Loss of age . . . loss of a job . . . loss of a breast . . . loss of mental agility . . . loss of a city after a move . . . loss of a child who goes off to college . . . and on and on and on it goes.

I read a paragraph in a book the other day about the importance of taking time to heal. The author said that when we step back and heal ourselves we become aware of a world full of people in need. My time of retreat is coming to a close. I hope I don’t go back home and get too wrapped up in schedules and deadlines and the frustrations of city traffic. I hope I can heed the author’s advice and help heal the world in little personal ways. Š

Got ED? Solve it Using Tadalafil

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is not really uncommon as it seems because it is said that one in five men will experience it under varying severity.  This literally means that 20% of the male population will have some sort of erectile dysfunction.  If you are included among those 20%, you can call yourself very unfortunate because the condition deprives you of having a normal sex life.  Nevertheless, you can still consider yourself very fortunate, even if you have ED, because you now live in an age where the condition can be temporarily treated so you can fulfill not just your sexual needs, but the sexual needs of your partner as well.

There are different types of medications used in treating ED, such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil, avanafil, and tadalafil.  However, even though they are different, all of them are classified as PDE5 inhibitor drugs.  What this means is that even if these ED drugs have different active ingredients, their main course of action is still the same and that is the relaxing of the smooth muscles covering the penis to make blood be pumped effectively into the cavity within the penis in order to achieve an erection. Read more…

Wasa with Poached Salmon, Basil and Tomato

Ingredients

1 filet (3.5 ounces) salmon, poached*
¼ cup sweet grape or cherry tomatoes, sliced
¼ cup thinly sliced scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon (2 to 3 leaves) fresh basil
1 teaspoon fresh oregano
1 tablespoon capers
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons olive oil
3 pieces WASA Fiber Rye crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Mix together in a large bowl, tomatoes, scallions, basil, oregano, capers, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.
Add salmon chunks and mix gently. Serve with WASA on the side of salmon mixture.

TIP: To poach salmon, place in salted, simmering water for 6-7 minutes or until salmon is opaque in center. Do not boil water. Cool and remove skin.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 416 g
Total Fat 25 g
Saturated Fat 5.3 g
Cholesterol 65 mg
Sodium 476 mg
Total Carbohydrate 29 g
Dietary Fiber 9 g
Protein 28 g
Calcium 89 g

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