Category Archives: USA-L

Episode Title: “The Two Mrs. Grissoms”

CRAVE ONLINE CSI 11.13 ‘The Two Mrs. Grissoms’ Sara clashes with her mother-in-law and Gil’s Ex while investigating a bombing at a school for the deaf. by Hilary Rothing Episode Title: “The Two Mrs. Grissoms” Writers: Treena Hancock and Melissa R. Byer Director: Steven Felder Story: While attending a scholarship benefit party for the hearing [...]

Feb 5 COME IN FROM THE COLD HOT PANCAKES – HOT COFFEE – FULL BREAKFAST – LIVE MUSIC WHAT:       Austin SERTOMA Club’s 6th Annual Pancake Breakfast Proceeds benefit the Austin SERTOMA Club’s sponsorship programs for Texas’ deaf and hard of hearing community. WHEN:      Saturday, February 5, 2011 – 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM WHERE:   Texas [...]

Vanderbilt University Research by Craig Boerner | Posted on Friday, Feb. 4, 2011 — 11:51 AM volunteer reading to child Volunteer Becky Clark reads to a student at the Mama Lere Hearing School at Vanderbilt (Anne Rayner / Vanderbilt) OPTION Schools Inc., in collaboration with the Vanderbilt Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, is conducting [...]

Crain’s Cleveland Business An image from “Hamill,” which will open the 35th Cleveland International Film Festival By SCOTT SUTTELL 12:55 pm, February 4, 2011 Dramas about compelling real-life stories will open and close the 35th Cleveland International Film Festival. The festival announced today that its opener on Thursday, March 24, will be “Hamill,” a film [...]

Dallas News By ERIC AASEN Staff Writer Published 04 February 2011 10:35 AM During Sunday’s Super Bowl, while the stars are singing, Candice Villesca will be signing. The Lewisville woman, who was born deaf, will sign the national anthem and “America the Beautiful” at Cowboys Stadium. Villesca, 22, says it is an honor. “I believe [...]

Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) Gary McLendon • Staff writer • February 2, 2011 Two Rochester Institute of Technology-National Technical Institute for the Deaf students will appear on national television Friday night to expose the problem of discrimination against the deaf. The students, including Brighton High School graduate Hannah Worek, will appear as actors on [...]

USA Today 06:12 PM By Michael McCarthy, USA TODAY The NFL, the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) and Fox are announcing that the Super Bowl will be completely captioned for the first time in history, including all nationally-televised TV commercials and promotions. The NAD estimates 36 million Americans are either deaf or hard-of-hearing. Many [...]

Sports Illustrated Now all those Super Bowl commercials will be captioned for everyone to enjoy. Sunday will mark the first fully captioned national broadcast of the Super Bowl, including all national commercials and promotions, for those who are deaf or hard of hearing. The National Association of the Deaf applauded the NFL and Fox for [...]

NTID News February 2, 2011 What happened when deaf students recently applying for a job at a coffee shop were met with these comments: “We don’t hire deaf people here.” “I’m sure you can do lots of things. But this is not the job for you.” “The next time you come in here, bring an [...]

Star Tribune Posted by Rose French Last update: January 31, 2011 – 1:28 PM St. Paul attorney Jeff Anderson, who represents hundreds of clergy child sex abuse victims across the U.S., says the Vatican has refused to be served with the lawsuit of an Illinois man who claims he was sexually abused by a now-deceased [...]

Internet Yoga

Yoga has gone high tech.

In the last few weeks I’ve come across three different websites offering “online” yoga classes.

Core Power Yoga (click “yoga on demand”)

Yoga Today (offering “outdoor” yoga classes)

&

Jiva Diva (scroll down to “live classes”)

All three sites give free classes or trial runs. I’m seriously considering trying one out because I’m about to head to Colorado for a mountain retreat for two weeks. The last time I was on retreat I found a gem of a yoga teacher who gave 90 minute private lessons out of her home for $25 (talk about a deal!). But she’s now home-schooling her kids and doesn’t have time for another student (me).

So…I’m thinking of logging on to my computer for Downward-Facing Dog time. But after debating which site to try, I actually decided that instead of Internet classes, I am going to take this time to better develop my own home practice. Tune-in next week to see if I can recall the sequence for Sun Salutations and figure out how to move into Trikonasana (Triangle Pose) without my yoga teacher prodding me to firm my thighs. I’m looking forward to rolling out my mat by my bedside and trusting myself and my practice (okay, I might bring a book of poses for a little cheat sheet, but mostly I’ll be on my own).Š

Special Occasions

The street is cleared of traffic, the tents are up, and the vendors are selling summer squash, cherries, and herbs. It’s the second week this season the farmers’ market has been open in town, and my husband escapes from the office so we can enjoy lunch together and wander by the open-air booths. We buy bread (baked from scratch) from one of our favorite vendors and discuss what we can grill, cook, and drink over the next few days.

As we walk, I start thinking about how I’ll be spending a lot more time at farmers’ markets this summer than I have in the past – it’s easier to find local, sustainably-grown food here than at the grocery stores. I’ve always enjoyed farmers’ markets, but I’ve tended to reserve them for “special occasions.” When I lived in Los Angeles my friends and I would load up with market goodies before going to a concert at the Hollywood Bowl, or for a picnic at the beach, or if we had guests coming to town.

With over 3500 farmers’ markets in the United States (visit LocalHarvest.org to find one near you) there are plenty here on the east coast where I currently live. I’ll be visiting more of them over the next few days to get a feel for the ones I prefer, talk to vendors, and gather local meat, eggs, and more fruit and veggies. I know I have my work cut out for me this summer as I learn how to prepare meals, can tomatoes, and make my own salad dressing. But taking the first step and creating the intent to eat clean is one of the biggest hurdles. Besides, it feels good to realize that what used to be a “special occasion” will now be a part of daily life.

Holidays are Changing

I’m trying to talk my parents and in-laws into coming to our place for Thanksgiving.

Ever since leaving for college at age 18, I’ve traveled over the holidays.

My hubby and I are moving in early November, and we’ll hopefully be settled into our new place by Turkey Day. I’d hate to move in and then turn around and leave right away. Plus, it sounds fun to host the holidays. Of course, I’ve never cooked a Thanksgiving dinner before, but a minor detail, right? I can figure it out.

One year I asked my mom if she’d teach me to cook the turkey. I arrived at her house ready to tackle the bird and learn how to make stuffing. My grandmother was visiting too. The two of them have been taking on Thanksgiving together forever, and despite my good intentions, everyone fell into their normal roles that year. My brother helped mash the potatoes, my dad prepared to carve, I found myself setting the table, pouring the wine, and arranging the relish tray. My mom and grandmother had their own rhythm and didn’t need anyone – including me – butting in. Or maybe I simply got distracted watching whatever movies my brother had rented from the video store. Either way, I never learned how to bake a turkey. (Actually, bake or roast?)

This year will be different. My grandmother no longer travels. One of my brothers is married and will be away. I’ve pegged the local, sustainable farm where I plan to purchase Mr. Tom. (For any vegetarians, here are some recipes I stumbled across on GentleThanksgiving.org).

My parents jumped on the chance to come to my place for a change. I hope my in-laws do too.

Times are changing. Times are changing.

Part of me is nervous about altering the rhythm of our holiday, but I’m excited too.

Lazy Bones

During yoga class the teacher, Tina, tells me to lift up a bit. I’m squatting in a pose (it’s sort of this made up pose that I’ve dubbed the Tinasana) and Tina says my middle is sagging.

“The muscles in your body will automatically revert to being lazy if given the chance,” she says.

Lazy? But I’m working so hard, I think.

Later, in Warrior II I’m concentrating on my arms when Tina reminds me to firm my thighs. If I don’t pay attention, they become lazy.

Yet another pose and my feet are splaying instead of pointing in the right direction. Guess why?

Really. Out of all the things in the world, I don’t consider myself lazy. But apparently even when I’m truly working on my alignment there are parts of my body that are secretly trying to get away with as little as possible.

After class I start thinking . . . does that apply to other areas of my life?

No way. I’m motivated! Diligent!Relentless in my pursuits!

Aren’t I?

Except in the mornings. I like to linger in bed. It’s warm and cozy. Plus I’m still sleepy. By the time I do get up, shower, and eat breakfast, I’m always surprised at how much of the day has gotten away from me before I make it to my home office.

And walking. I love my afternoon walks. Love them. Then why do I skip them from time to time, opting instead to sit and work a little longer?

Speaking of work, I realized something as I began investigating this whole laziness issue. If I have ten things on my “To Do” list, I tend to opt for the easiest projects first. When I do start working on a hard topic (say an article that requires a lot of research or possibly a personal essay that forces me to do some inner work), I will drop it as soon as I feel stuck. I tell myself I’ll get back to it and turn my attention to the easier assignments again.

Isn’t it funny the insights yoga gives us into our lives? So if you’ll excuse me, I have an article I’ve put off. I’d better get working on it.

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