Category Archives: Texas DeafTimes

The Houston Bass Club of the Deaf in Texas is hosting some events in April 2013.  The 4th Annual Crawfish Event will be on April 20th at the Christia Adair Park.  Then later that month on the 25th to the 27th, they will host the 47th Annual State Team Bass Tournament at Lake Sam Rayburn. […]

Brown Middle School worked with parents of deaf children on a Saturday in January 2013 to help them learn how to communicate with their children.  The Regional Day School Program for the Deaf also had activities for the students while their parents were at the retreat.  25 parents attended that retreat.  

Dr. Victor Henry Galloway, who was the first Deaf superintendent of the Texas School for the Deaf during the 1980′s, was also the first Deaf superintendent of the Scranton State School for the Deaf in Pennsylvania from 1979 – 1981.  He died on January 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  He was survived by his wife, Mrs. […]

A national Deaf Hispanic (Latino) conference will be held in Austin, Texas in September.  The National Council of Hispano Deaf and Hard of Hearing are meeting on September 13th through the 16th.  The website for this organization also advertised some other events: The Latino Deaf Youth Leadership will have their pre conference on September 12th and […]

Deaf Baseball and Softball Event

The California School for the Deaf in Riverside is hosting the Hoy XII Baseball and Softball Classic on April 27-28.  During this event, teams from Riverside, CA, Fremont, CA, Indiana, Texas, and Maryland will be competing against each other.  

Germaphobe

The waiter walks over and sets a glass of ice-water on the table.

“Ew,” my mom says when he walks away. “I don’t like it when restaurants put lemons in your drink.”

For years she’s claimed that lemon wedges have tons of bacteria – picked up because of how much they are handled by bare human hands – and this YouTube video seems to prove she’s right, reporting that over 77% of lemon wedges in drinks tested positive for disease causing bacteria.

My husband has an issue with restaurants that place the silverware directly on the table instead of on a napkin or tablecloth. When I tell him the tables are washed, he says, “Yeah, but have you seen those ratty rags they use?”

What a bunch of germaphobes!

Except I have my issues too. I don’t like touching menus. I especially can’t stand it when a waiter places a menu down on top of my plate. I mean really, when are menus cleaned?

I’m totally of the belief that exposure to bad bacteria can build my immune system. And, logically, I know that menus are only one of many places I’m coming across a boatload of germs. But still, menus freak me out.

Do you have any quirky things you’re a germ-freak about?

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

Bring It On

I’m about to fall asleep when my husband, Ron, reaches out and shakes my shoulder.

“Are you awake?” he asks.

“Yes,” I say.

“What do you want for your birthday?”

“Hmmm,” I say. “I don’t know. Let me think about it.”

But I do know. I’m debating between various brands of juicers (Green Star or Omega – any thoughts?). Ron is going to keel over when he hears this. In the six years we’ve been together, I’ve never asked for a single item relating to the kitchen.

Not a pot.

Not a pan.

Not a knife, a spatula, or a whisk.

Growing up, I never learned how to cook. My girlfriends and I — we were women of a new generation. We were going to be doctors, lawyers, and mathematicians (and we are). There would be no time for preparing meals. (I’m not sure what our eating plan was — hired help? fast food? — we didn’t think about that part). I do vaguely recall taking a Home Economics course in high school. Men were required to take it too. We baked a pie. I stared at the aluminum container holding the crust and debated between leaving it or removing it. I wasn’t sure aluminum should go in the oven so I took it off. My pie looked more like a pancake.

People change, though.

Now I see our kitchen in a whole new light. Cooking spinach lasagna the other night, I sipped a glass of wine and turned on some tunes. I had to call my mother — twice — and ask her whether I was supposed to cook the whole wheat lasagna noodles or layer them in the dish uncooked. (The first time she said, “Cook ‘em!” and the second time she said, “Yes, I’m positive. Cook ‘’em!”) I cooked the noodles. The food was delicious. I’m no longer intimidated by the kitchen. Bring on the juicer! Š

Vardenafil HCL — Your Effective Medication for Impotency

Impotency is just one of the many challenges a man could experience, and if you happen to acquire this symptom, then you have just landed on the right page. Although there are many drugs available in the market these days for treating erection difficulties, you can find Vardenafil HCL 20mg medication as one of the most prescribed drugs by your doctor.

Vardenafil basically works by pumping more blood supply towards the male organ to help stimulate sexual drive. However, the drug does not guarantee you a lifetime treatment – ED is incurable and the drugs available such as Vardenafil are only instruments to improve sexual performance. Of course, you have to be sexually aroused to appreciate the results of this medication.

How to take Vardenafil

Take this medication by swallowing the tablet immediately – don’t break, split, crush, or chew the tablet. You can also take this drug with your regular meals, or even without food. Vardenafil should work 60 minutes after the medicine has been ingested.
Doctors may recommend you the appropriate dosage as well as the proper interval of time in taking your medications. Follow the prescriptions sincerely and read the labels so you will have information about how the drug should work. Never attempt to go beyond the prescription or taking the drug more often than what is recommended; otherwise, the possible side effects will be magnified and you will likely experience the negative symptoms. Read more…

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