Category Archives: Texas DeafTimes

The Houston Bass Club of the Deaf in Texas is hosting some events in April 2013.  The 4th Annual Crawfish Event will be on April 20th at the Christia Adair Park.  Then later that month on the 25th to the 27th, they will host the 47th Annual State Team Bass Tournament at Lake Sam Rayburn. […]

Brown Middle School worked with parents of deaf children on a Saturday in January 2013 to help them learn how to communicate with their children.  The Regional Day School Program for the Deaf also had activities for the students while their parents were at the retreat.  25 parents attended that retreat.  

Dr. Victor Henry Galloway, who was the first Deaf superintendent of the Texas School for the Deaf during the 1980′s, was also the first Deaf superintendent of the Scranton State School for the Deaf in Pennsylvania from 1979 – 1981.  He died on January 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  He was survived by his wife, Mrs. […]

A national Deaf Hispanic (Latino) conference will be held in Austin, Texas in September.  The National Council of Hispano Deaf and Hard of Hearing are meeting on September 13th through the 16th.  The website for this organization also advertised some other events: The Latino Deaf Youth Leadership will have their pre conference on September 12th and […]

Deaf Baseball and Softball Event

The California School for the Deaf in Riverside is hosting the Hoy XII Baseball and Softball Classic on April 27-28.  During this event, teams from Riverside, CA, Fremont, CA, Indiana, Texas, and Maryland will be competing against each other.  

HGH Growth Hormone – Is it Worth the Shot?

One of the most controversial products available in the market today is the HGH growth hormone.  Researchers believed that such discovery of the so-called “fountain of youth” is an awesome breakthrough to enhance the quality of living. On the contrary, some health professionals have argued about the potential risks of taking an HGH dose which could lead to fatal diseases and cancer. However, none of these sides can provide solid evidences due to the lack of related studies. The benefits as well as the potential negative effects linked with HGH supplements are still a mystery, and the final verdict is left to you, the consumer.

 

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Freedom

I was “birthed” into the world of yoga through the Iyengar style where precision and alignment are emphasized. My teacher would adjust our poses starting from our pinky toe (literally – she’d have us lift it up and try to spread it away from our other toes) all the way to the tops of our heads (which, she would tell us, should be lifting toward the ceiling, as if a string was attached to our scalp and someone was pulling).

I’m one of those follow the rules, read the directions, life is in the details type of girls, so I ate Iyengar yoga up. The fact that my hamstrings are tight, my shoulders are scrunched, and my hips are narrow make Iyengar a fitting practice because I benefit so greatly from the blocks and straps and blankets that are generously encouraged in that style of practice to help with proper positioning.

From time to time I’ve experimented with other yoga styles – this article describes various kinds – and recently I found myself in a session where the teacher was leading a flow with pretty much no regard to form whatsoever.

At first I was distraught.

“Beautiful!” the yoga teacher said when I moved into Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II).

“Oh, yeah, right,” I thought to myself.

In an Iyengar class, the instructor is always adjusting my Warrior II pose. I’m like a toy where you push one section in and another section pops out. If she moves my left thigh, my right knee tweaks to a different place. If she tilts my pelvis, my arms plummet. If she tells me where to fix my gaze – whoops – there goes my thigh again.

Anyway, I realized pretty quickly that I didn’t want to spend the entire practice mentally upset that this yoga teacher wasn’t going to focus on form. Other than calling out the pose, she was giving no instructions, and deep inside I knew that was okay. Because yoga really isn’t about form. Not at its core. It’s about being in a present state of mind. Finding a place where I’m not worrying about the future or obsessing over the past, even if those thoughts relate to yoga itself. As I continued the flow, I let go of the details and the precision and simply enjoyed the movement.

I felt warm and flexible and free.

Good Vibrations

I’ve been in Downward-Facing Dog for awhile. My legs and arms are starting to shake. I’m always a little embarrassed when this happens.

The teacher walks by my mat and slows down.

“Feel that shaking?” she asks.

“Uh, yeah,” I say.

“That’s good,” she says.

“Good?”

“It’s your body’s energy.”

I stay in position and think, My body’s energy? Nope, I’m pretty sure it’s just my muscles on the verge of collapse!

“You may have the urge to try to control the shaking,” she says.

Yes, I think.

“Or you may feel the urge to let go and shake uncontrollably,” she says.

I nod upside down. Giving in and letting the shaking take over sounds even better.

“Find the balance between the two. You don’t want to block it, but you don’t want to over-indulge it.”

She talks more about the body’s energy, and I’m not sure I completely understand all she’s saying. But as my body stretches, strengthens, balances, and shakes, I stay with it. I stay true to the moment, sensing the balance between control and lack of it. Suddenly the shaking doesn’t feel so embarrassing; it actually feels kind of good.

Special Occasions

The street is cleared of traffic, the tents are up, and the vendors are selling summer squash, cherries, and herbs. It’s the second week this season the farmers’ market has been open in town, and my husband escapes from the office so we can enjoy lunch together and wander by the open-air booths. We buy bread (baked from scratch) from one of our favorite vendors and discuss what we can grill, cook, and drink over the next few days.

As we walk, I start thinking about how I’ll be spending a lot more time at farmers’ markets this summer than I have in the past – it’s easier to find local, sustainably-grown food here than at the grocery stores. I’ve always enjoyed farmers’ markets, but I’ve tended to reserve them for “special occasions.” When I lived in Los Angeles my friends and I would load up with market goodies before going to a concert at the Hollywood Bowl, or for a picnic at the beach, or if we had guests coming to town.

With over 3500 farmers’ markets in the United States (visit LocalHarvest.org to find one near you) there are plenty here on the east coast where I currently live. I’ll be visiting more of them over the next few days to get a feel for the ones I prefer, talk to vendors, and gather local meat, eggs, and more fruit and veggies. I know I have my work cut out for me this summer as I learn how to prepare meals, can tomatoes, and make my own salad dressing. But taking the first step and creating the intent to eat clean is one of the biggest hurdles. Besides, it feels good to realize that what used to be a “special occasion” will now be a part of daily life.

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