Category Archives: New York Deaftimes

We’re thrilled to announce more sign-language-interpreted Shabbat Morning Services, and we hope that you can join us! ********** WHAT: A Service with full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets) WHEN: 10:00 AM — 12:30 PM on Saturdays, October 19th & November 9th WHERE: Town & Village (T&V) Synagogue (www.tandv.org), 334 East 14th Street, between […]

—————————————————————————————- http://www.RSDeaf.org/Adventures   Rochester School for the Deaf presents 21st ANNUAL ADVENTURES IN EDUCATION   TODD HUSTON: “MORE THAN MOUNTAINS“ October 16-17, 2013   Get ready to be truly inspired by Todd Huston – a uniquely brave and humble individual, who has overcome incredible challenges to achieve his goals and make his dreams come true. […]

– RRCD1564 Lyell Ave Rochester, NY 14606 Email: Please check our calendar. www.RochesterDeafClub.com

Volunteer Opportunity: Rochester School for the Deaf is hosting this year’s Gallaudet University Northeastern Region Academic Bowl, December 5-7. Eighteen high school teams of deaf/hard-of-hearing students from across the Northeast will converge on the RSD campus for this momentous event. There is a need for as many as 50 volunteers! and we are now recruiting and […]

October 10, 2013 Thursday 2 – 3:15 in LBJ 2590 De’VIA artists – Nancy Rourke & Ellen Mansfield: From Deafhood to Artivism October 11 – 12, 2013 Friday and Saturday Deaf View / Image Artists (De’VIA) Marketplace Dyer Arts Center, LBJ Meet and buy art from Janna Dahl, Hinda Kasher, Ellen Mansfield, Nancy Rourke, Jackie […]

The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, Sportsman Education Program announces a Hunter Education class that we are offering that will have an ASL interpreter present. Hunter Education is required for anyone who want to hunt for the first time.   These classes are available to anyone 11 yrs old and older (one must be 12 to hunt in […]

ASL Storytelling Event

See Flyer…

We’re thrilled to announce T&V’s first sign-language-interpreted Rosh Hashanah Service, soon to be followed by our fourth annual ASL-interpreted Kol Nidre Service on Yom Kippur, and we hope that you can join us! ********** WHAT: A Rosh Hashanah Service with full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets), and a blowing of the Shofar WHEN: 10:00 […]

  Sign Language Interpreted Jewish High Holy Day Services Temple Avodat Shalom, 385 Howland Ave, River Edge, NJ 07661,  will have sign language interpreted services as follows: Rosh Hashanah (2nd day) Friday, Sept. 6th at 10:00 am Yom Kippur (including Yizkor) Saturday, Sept. 14 at 3:00 pm There is no charge, but a donation is appreciated. (Please note […]

Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

Do I Knead a Bread Machine?

Bread.

The staple of life.

Now that I’ve gotten used to making my own fresh vegetable juice, I’m thinking of bread. I recall reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle a few months ago and coming across a passage by the author’s husband (Steven Hopp) who makes a fresh loaf practically everyday.

He says, “I know you’ve got one around somewhere: maybe in the closet. Or on the kitchen counter, so dusty nobody remembers it’s there. A bread machine.”

A bread machine? Nope, don’t have one in the closet or on the counter or anywhere. I’m lucky if I can find a spatula in our kitchen. During a party this spring, I was talking with the host’s mother. She’s in her late 80s and makes her own bread. I told her I wanted to learn so I could make homemade pizza dough, whole wheat, pumpernickel, etc.

“But I don’t have a bread machine,” I said.

She practically fell out of her chair laughing. I guess if you really know how to make bread the old fashioned way, you knead the dough. By hand. For a long time.

“You have to feel the dough to make sure it’s right,” she said.

Call me crazy, but kneading dough by hand actually sounds fun. I think I’ll try it (although I have no idea what it’s supposed to “feel” like, so I’ll have to wing that part). In the meantime, I’ll keep my eye out at garage sales for someone else’s barely-used, dusty bread machine.

Big on Arms

We are in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II) and the teacher is walking us through the pose nice and slow. She has us begin in Tadasana (Mountain pose) and then tells us to touch our fingertips together in front of our chest. As we jump our legs apart, our arms open up too (so they are parallel to the ground).

Next, the real instruction begins. She focuses on our feet, making sure they are spaced far enough apart and turned in the proper direction. She reminds us that our back heel should be aligned with our front heel.

She pauses as we breathe.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

She moves onto our legs. She makes sure that our right knee is bent so that it’s directly over the right ankle. We need to press our thigh back so we can see our second toe. She keeps us focused on our lower body, giving us directions on our tailbone, butt, and – again – our thighs. She mentions that second toe again.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

You can practically hear the thoughts of every student in the studio: My arms are tired. My arms are so tired! When will this pose be over so we can put our arms down? Are anyone else’s arms tired? Or am I just a wimp? How much longer do we have to hold our arms up?

Finally, the teacher says, “I know your arms are tired.”

Her acknowledgement is a relief even though she encourages us to keep those arms lifted. “Stretch them out even further, reeeaaaaching for the walls,” she says.

She moves onto our shoulder blades – are they scrunched up by our neck? Release them.

Lengthen our torsos.

Broaden our chests.

She knows exactly what we’re doing – allowing our minds to be consumed with thoughts about our arms.

“Your brain starts to panic first,” she says. “Your body is strong and your arms can handle this.”

That’s the extra motivation we need for the last few breaths until she finally has us step our feet back together and place our hands on our hips.

I’m working out in LA for a couple weeks – my old hometown – and it’s great to be back in my favorite teacher’s class. Now that I’m here, I remember she was always big on arms.

Wasa with Cottage Cheese, Strawberries and Blood Orange

Ingredients

4 ounces low fat cottage cheese
1 cup (6 ounces) fresh strawberries, chopped
½ teaspoon blood orange zest
1 teaspoon juice from a blood orange
2 teaspoons honey
4 pieces WASA Sourdough Rye Crispbread (May substitute WASA Multigrain, Hearty Rye, Sourdough Rye, or Oats Crispbread)

Directions

Mix together strawberries, ¼ teaspoon zest, blood orange juice, and honey in a small bowl.
Spread cottage cheese on cracker, top with mixture, and sprinkle with remaining zest.

TIP: May substitute any berries, peaches, apricots, or pineapple for strawberries. You can also substitute a regular orange for a blood orange.
Refrigerate leftovers for 3-4 days.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

 

Calories 322
Total Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 0.8 g
Cholesterol 5 mg
Sodium 641 g
Total Carbohydrate 65 g
Dietary Fiber 12 g
Protein 19 g
Calcium 100 mg

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