Category Archives: North West DeafTimes

Here are some summer camps for deaf and hard of hearing children, KODA’s, and families: In California: Camp Grizzly – Portola CA  http://www.norcalcenter.org/campgrizzly - For children between the ages of 7 and 15. Lions Camp - http://www.lionswildcamp.org/applications.html - For children between the ages of 7 and 15. In Other States: Colorado – Aspen Camp  See http://www.aspencamp.org/ and http://csdeagles.com/outreach/calnews/2012-13/spring-13.pdf on page 20 for […]

Youth Leadership Camp for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) will have its 2013 NAD Youth Leadership Camp (YLC) from June 20 through July 17. The YLC Camp is open to young deaf and hard of hearing students.  It will be at Camp Taloali, located in the foothills of Oregon’s Cascade Mountains.  Campers and staff application forms are now online at […]

  Yakima Herald-Republic A bronze statue of the chimpanzee,Washoe, the first non-human to acquire a human language skill (American Sign Language), sits at the newly completed Friendship Park on East Fifth Avenue in Ellensburg, Wash, Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012. Washoe, who … To see more…

KIRO Seattle A federal disability rights group has launched a probe into how Tacoma police and the Pierce County Jail treated a deaf crime victim. That action comes as a direct result of a KIRO Team 7 Investigation. In a report on August 5, Investigative Reporter … See more…

Opposing Views In Tacoma, Washington, Lashonn White, who is deaf, claims that police tased and jailed her for sixty hours without an interpreter (video below). White called 911, on April 6, when she was being assaulted by a guest. White told KIRO-TV: “I said, ‘Please … See more…

Former School for Deaf teacher’s credentials suspendedThe Columbian Debbie Pietsch, a teacher who in December resigned from the Washington School for the Deaf, has had her teaching certificate suspended for 30 days by state education officials. See more…

Statesman Journal It originally was built for The Oregon Deaf-Mute Institute in 1884. The building now is on the Corban University campus as Schimmel Hall. / Special to the Statesman Journal This building is one of the main buildings for the Western Baptist Bible … Click here…

Snoqualmie Valley Record Instead the interpreter named in the brief, Sal Contreras, “was actually a Spanish interpreter who knew a little sign language,” Spencer said. “He certainly wasn’t qualified to do sign language.” Kral has relied on American Sign Language to communicate … Click here to see more

The Register-Guard Peter Quint was an untenured instructor who taught first-year American Sign Language classes during the 2009-10 school year and who taught second-year American Sign Language classes in 2010-11. In his federal lawsuit, he alleged that his UO School of … Click here to read more

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

Freedom

I was “birthed” into the world of yoga through the Iyengar style where precision and alignment are emphasized. My teacher would adjust our poses starting from our pinky toe (literally – she’d have us lift it up and try to spread it away from our other toes) all the way to the tops of our heads (which, she would tell us, should be lifting toward the ceiling, as if a string was attached to our scalp and someone was pulling).

I’m one of those follow the rules, read the directions, life is in the details type of girls, so I ate Iyengar yoga up. The fact that my hamstrings are tight, my shoulders are scrunched, and my hips are narrow make Iyengar a fitting practice because I benefit so greatly from the blocks and straps and blankets that are generously encouraged in that style of practice to help with proper positioning.

From time to time I’ve experimented with other yoga styles – this article describes various kinds – and recently I found myself in a session where the teacher was leading a flow with pretty much no regard to form whatsoever.

At first I was distraught.

“Beautiful!” the yoga teacher said when I moved into Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II).

“Oh, yeah, right,” I thought to myself.

In an Iyengar class, the instructor is always adjusting my Warrior II pose. I’m like a toy where you push one section in and another section pops out. If she moves my left thigh, my right knee tweaks to a different place. If she tilts my pelvis, my arms plummet. If she tells me where to fix my gaze – whoops – there goes my thigh again.

Anyway, I realized pretty quickly that I didn’t want to spend the entire practice mentally upset that this yoga teacher wasn’t going to focus on form. Other than calling out the pose, she was giving no instructions, and deep inside I knew that was okay. Because yoga really isn’t about form. Not at its core. It’s about being in a present state of mind. Finding a place where I’m not worrying about the future or obsessing over the past, even if those thoughts relate to yoga itself. As I continued the flow, I let go of the details and the precision and simply enjoyed the movement.

I felt warm and flexible and free.

Finding Flexibility in Inflexibility

Week 2 of my six-week stint at a newspaper is coming to a close. Four more weeks to go. It’s a blessing, as a freelancer, to have the opportunity to be a part of these projects (steady work! money! live interaction with creatures other than my dog!). But man, the corporate life wipes me out.

I get home from work about 7:30 p.m., make dinner, eat, and plop into bed by 9:00 p.m., exhausted, where I drag my laptop on my lap and spend another couple of hours swaying between vegging out and trying to keep up with my other assignments. The evening yoga class I’d planned to attend? Skipped again.

The other night during one of my zombie-like states, I was flipping through Yoga Journal magazine. The question of the month just so happened to be from a reader who wants to dedicate more time to a yoga practice but finds that work leaves little time or energy to do so.

The yogi who answered the reader question suggested three options (1) back off of a less fulfilling activity and replace it with yoga; (2) spend less time working and more time practicing (which probably means adjusting your standard of living since you’ll presumably make less money if you cut back on work); or (3) make yoga a priority in your free time.

For now I’m choosing option three — switching to a weekend yoga class instead of trying to cram a class in after work when I’m tired and hungry.

Do you have an inflexible schedule that makes practicing yoga more challenging? How do you adjust?

Like the Lotus

During closing, my hands are at my heart in prayer. The yoga teacher says to move my fingers so that only my thumbs and pinky are touching – the center is to remain open, like a flower. She says the lotus grows in the mud and opens up when the sun shines on it, and closes when it doesn’t. She says, “Remember that when life is murkey, and I’m struggling through the mud, to open up, like the lotus.”

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