Category Archives: North West DeafTimes

Here are some summer camps for deaf and hard of hearing children, KODA’s, and families: In California: Camp Grizzly – Portola CA  http://www.norcalcenter.org/campgrizzly - For children between the ages of 7 and 15. Lions Camp - http://www.lionswildcamp.org/applications.html - For children between the ages of 7 and 15. In Other States: Colorado – Aspen Camp  See http://www.aspencamp.org/ and http://csdeagles.com/outreach/calnews/2012-13/spring-13.pdf on page 20 for […]

Youth Leadership Camp for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) will have its 2013 NAD Youth Leadership Camp (YLC) from June 20 through July 17. The YLC Camp is open to young deaf and hard of hearing students.  It will be at Camp Taloali, located in the foothills of Oregon’s Cascade Mountains.  Campers and staff application forms are now online at […]

  Yakima Herald-Republic A bronze statue of the chimpanzee,Washoe, the first non-human to acquire a human language skill (American Sign Language), sits at the newly completed Friendship Park on East Fifth Avenue in Ellensburg, Wash, Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012. Washoe, who … To see more…

KIRO Seattle A federal disability rights group has launched a probe into how Tacoma police and the Pierce County Jail treated a deaf crime victim. That action comes as a direct result of a KIRO Team 7 Investigation. In a report on August 5, Investigative Reporter … See more…

Opposing Views In Tacoma, Washington, Lashonn White, who is deaf, claims that police tased and jailed her for sixty hours without an interpreter (video below). White called 911, on April 6, when she was being assaulted by a guest. White told KIRO-TV: “I said, ‘Please … See more…

Former School for Deaf teacher’s credentials suspendedThe Columbian Debbie Pietsch, a teacher who in December resigned from the Washington School for the Deaf, has had her teaching certificate suspended for 30 days by state education officials. See more…

Statesman Journal It originally was built for The Oregon Deaf-Mute Institute in 1884. The building now is on the Corban University campus as Schimmel Hall. / Special to the Statesman Journal This building is one of the main buildings for the Western Baptist Bible … Click here…

Snoqualmie Valley Record Instead the interpreter named in the brief, Sal Contreras, “was actually a Spanish interpreter who knew a little sign language,” Spencer said. “He certainly wasn’t qualified to do sign language.” Kral has relied on American Sign Language to communicate … Click here to see more

The Register-Guard Peter Quint was an untenured instructor who taught first-year American Sign Language classes during the 2009-10 school year and who taught second-year American Sign Language classes in 2010-11. In his federal lawsuit, he alleged that his UO School of … Click here to read more

Wasa with Smoked Salmon and Goat Cheese

Ingredients

2 tablespoons goat cheese
1 tablespoon capers
1 tablespoon chopped chives
2 slices smoked salmon
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 teaspoon lemon juice
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons mixed baby salad greens
2 pieces WASA Light Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Sread 1 tablespoon of goat cheese on each crispbread. Sprinkle each crispbread with 1/2 tablespoon of capers and ½ tablespoon chopped chives. Cover each with thinly sliced salmon.
Mix olive oil and lemon juice together. Sprinkle ½ of the oil mixture on each crispbread. Sprinkle with fresh ground pepper.
Top with baby salad greens and sprinkle with remaining olive oil and lemon mixture.

TIP: Substitute cream cheese or low fat cream cheese or feta cheese for goat cheese.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serve 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 98
Total Fat 5 g
Saturated Fat 2 g
Cholesterol 10 mg
Sodium 371 mg
Total Carbohydrate 6 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Protein 6 g
Calcium 3% of daily value

Getting Your Tadalafil Online is Brilliant and Convenient

In the past, prior to the advent of the internet and e-commerce, people usually rely on pharmacies and drugstores to provide them with the medications they need.  Although this has always been the norm, the problem is that some retail outlets do not have, cater, or carry out certain branding or medications simply because they are not in partnership with the drug label or they do not stock such because they do not sell much and just occupy storage space.  For this reason, if you are looking for a certain drug that is not available in your area, either you go look around for it in neighboring cities that may have them, or simply settle for the nearest alternative to the drug but may not even come close in terms of effectiveness to what you are looking for.

Fortunately for all of us, we now live in an age where online commerce is abundant and internet connectivity is easily available.  This means if you are looking for a certain product or a particular type of medication, all you have to do is go online, open your favorite web browser, then, using your favorite search engine, enter your search query like “buy tadalafil online.”  This search will give you thousands of results, then it is up to you to look for the shop you would want to buy tadalafil online. Read more…

Honeymoon Phase

The work day was coming to an end. I was at my home office working on an article, and any moment I expected to hear my husband put his key in the lock and walk through the front door.

I adore this time of day.

I used to dread it, but I’m in a honeymoon phase. Dinnertime is almost here and I’m so in love with cooking.

Oh, sure, I’m thrilled to see my husband too. I enjoy hugging him and kissing him and sitting down together to talk about our days. But not that long ago, early evenings felt a little burdensome. Inevitably one of us would look at each other and ask: “So what are we going to do for dinner?”

Ugh! What a dilemma. We were usually at a loss because our cupboards were bare and besides, we were sick of the two recipes that we rotated through night after night after night after night.

Ever since we committed to making fresh, wholesome meals from scratch (or mostly scratch), our evenings have changed drastically. Our kitchen, for the first time ever, is abundant. We have fresh fruits and muffins, ingredients for homemade pizza, and spinach lasagna ready to reheat. We have a refrigerator full of red lettuce, apples, cherries, and tomatoes. Also we have a huge bowl of salsa because I’ve been on a salsa kick. (Basically, for the salsa I use the recipe from this book, combining corn, tomato, onion, pepper, carrots, black beans, parsley, garlic powder, and paprika. Then I add a little lemon juice, raw honey, and Dijon mustard for the dressing. I use it on everything – on top of mixed greens for a nice salad, as a topping to a veggie sandwich, on top of brown rice, as a dip for baked tortilla chips, etc.).

This week I’m experimenting with a variety of homemade salad dressings. When it comes to salad dressing though, my forever favorite is simply balsamic vinegar on top of baby spinach. I usually throw in pine nuts, sun dried tomatoes, goat cheese, and sautéed shitake mushrooms. The original recipe (which I copied from a menu in a restaurant whose name is slipping my mind) also called for bow tie pasta (I use tri-colored).

Tonight for dinner we’re having taco salad, and I’m going to mash up some avocados to make guacamole as a veggie dip. I’m excited about this.

People! How come no one ever told me cooking can be so fun?

In the Beginning

Thanks to all who have stopped by and/or left comments as the Wasa blog gets underway.

A couple people mentioned that this blog has inspired them to try yoga. I know the feeling. My husband inspired me to try yoga years ago after I watched him ease into a backbend with grace. I’ve mentioned that before, but what I failed to mention was the fact that I didn’t like my first yoga class. Or my second. Or third;

I knew the benefits of yoga – flexibility, awareness, inner stillness – were practices I needed in my life, but during class I couldn’t hold the poses. It takes time to find balance and build strength. Also, the teacher wasn’t a good fit. Plus, I kept slipping on my mat because I was wearing socks. Not to mention my loose-fitting t-shirt flipped over my head when I’d bend over for Downward Facing Dog.

So my first suggestion is to wear comfortable “stretchy” clothes. Slip off your shoes (and socks) before entering the studio. Bare feet help you “stick” to the mat. If you don’t have a mat, you can rent one. Sometimes they’re free, sometimes $1.

Okay, now you’re in the studio before class has begun. Believe it or not this can be the most intimidating part.

A few years ago I remember encouraging a friend to try a yoga class. We were traveling in San Francisco and the class was at 6am. I couldn’t attend because of another obligation (um, I believe it was sleep), but my friend was a super early riser and decided to try yoga for the first time. Ten minutes later she clamored back into the room complaining that when she walked in the studio all the students were gathering foam blocks, long white straps, and bolsters, and she had no idea what these were, if she needed any, and, if so, which ones she should take.¼br />

Oh gosh, I felt awful for sleeping in. I had completely forgotten how many times I’ve felt that exact same way when I’ve tried something new. Like the first time I tried a spinning class. I was standing in the cool dark studio when a group of women walked in all holding biking shoes (biking shoes? Oops! I didn’t have those). Then they began turning knobs, lowering the seats, and adjusting the handlebars. I was outta there in 30 seconds (I went back the next day – it turns out you don’t need biking shoes and the instructor showed me how to adjust the parts – but still).

Even just a few weeks ago I tried a new yoga studio and noticed the students folding blankets in a manner I’d never seen before. I’ve been practicing yoga for years and I still felt a bit out of place. I wasn’t sure if I should fold the blanket “my” way or “their” way. That question was answered when the teacher began class and showed everyone what she wanted us to do.

So, a few more suggestions: don’t worry about the blocks, straps, and blankets. They are props to help people (like me) adjust in certain poses. If you need a prop during a pose, the yoga teacher will bring it to you, or you can ask her before class begins. Also, consider brining a friend to your first class if that would make you feel more comfortable (a friend who has practiced before can show you the ropes; if not, you two can navigate the waters together).

Now class has begun . . . and you don’t understand a word the teacher is saying. Chaturanga Dandasana? Urdhva Mukha Svanasana? Virabhadrasana II? The same thing happened to me in a dance class once where the teacher was using terms I’d never heard. The students around me began spinning and hopping and twirling about as I stood there, motionless and a little annoyed (it was a “beginners” class). Finally I gave up and tried to sneak out of the room. A woman came over and touched me on the shoulder, “You just don’t know the lingo yet. You’ll get the hang of it,” she promised.

And I promise – you’ll get the hang of yoga lingo. I do, however, recommend finding an “intro to yoga” course if you’re trying it for the first time. After trying yoga and not liking it, I finally went to this 2-day orientation at Yoga Works. Instead of jumping right into sun salutations, we sat in a circle and talked. The teacher showed us how to breathe, answered our questions, and walked us slowly through the fundamental poses. That’s when yoga began to change to my life.

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