Category Archives: NJ-L

October flyer

We’re thrilled to announce more sign-language-interpreted Shabbat Morning Services, and we hope that you can join us! ********** WHAT: A Service with full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets) WHEN: 10:00 AM — 12:30 PM on Saturdays, October 19th & November 9th WHERE: Town & Village (T&V) Synagogue (www.tandv.org), 334 East 14th Street, between […]

Ocean Deaf Club, Inc.  Saturday, October 19th   Lingo Game *   The Presbyterian Church  101 Orchard Street, Lakehurst, NJ (Union Avenue & Pine Street)    Doors Open at 6:30pm The game will start around 7:30 pm Members: $10.00 Non-Members: $12.00 * Wear Black & Orange for a special Halloween Prize If you bring homemade or store bought dessert, […]

Northwest Jersey Association of the Deaf would let you know that ASL Storytelling Event on Oct 5th is cancelled due to insufficient attendees. We will host it sometime in the spring. We will keep you posted. If you already paid to attend, the money will return to you.

Ocean Deaf Club 2013 HOLIDAY FLYER-1

Our event is on Oct 25, Friday with Msgr Nelson and October 26th, Saturday With Nsgr Nelson and then Oct 27th – Msgr Nelson will celebrate mass with us.     Please see attachments. nelsonworkshopoct2 pizzapartynelson   Thank you, have a great Wednesday!     Kate Slosar Co-Director, Ministry with the Deaf Diocese of Camden […]

ASL Storytelling Event

Ocean Deaf Club, Inc.  Saturday, September 21st   Lingo Game    The Presbyterian Church  101 Orchard Street, Lakehurst, NJ (Union Avenue & Pine Street)    Doors Open at 6:30pm The game will start around 7:30 pm Members: $10.00 Non-Members: $12.00 If you bring homemade or store bought dessert, you will receive 3 extra door prize tickets.       […]

 Translation or Is It?   A dynamic Workshop for Deaf Interpreters, Deaf Persons, ASL Interpreters, Educational interpreters, Student interpreters, Teachers of ASL   September 21, 2013, Saturday 9:00 am – 3:00 pm Union County College Cranford Campus 1033 Springfield Ave. Cranford, NJ (Signs on location of room will be posted) Come and take workshop with […]

We’re thrilled to announce T&V’s first sign-language-interpreted Rosh Hashanah Service, soon to be followed by our fourth annual ASL-interpreted Kol Nidre Service on Yom Kippur, and we hope that you can join us! ********** WHAT: A Rosh Hashanah Service with full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets), and a blowing of the Shofar WHEN: 10:00 […]

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

Poetry

It’s not often I’m in a yoga class where the teacher gives a reading during closing. But those rare times when that has been the case — well, I’ve adored it. I love words. Language. Poetry. Here’s the quote my yoga teacher read the other day:

Even after all this time
the sun never says to the earth
you owe me.
Look what happens to a love
like that – it lights the whole sky.
– Hafiz

Basic Equipment

I enjoy the beginning of yoga class because the opening is generally “easy” – well, at least physically (the meditating part can bring up its own set of challenges).

But before we practice some of the more difficult poses, we usually we open by sitting in Sukhasana for a few minutes. And then maybe move onto our hands and knees to practice Dog Tilt and Cat Pose. It’s a place for gentle movements. A time to bring awareness to our breath.

The other day at the beginning of class, we were on our hands and knees with a neutral spine (tabletop). The teacher asked us to lift our right arm off the ground and straighten it so it pointed forward. Both of our arms were engaged. The left one pushing the floor away, and the right one reaching for the wall in front of us (in a way where we weren’t scrunching our shoulder blade up to our neck). She had us hold that position. For a long, long time. It was hard. (Don’t believe me? Try it.)

“Some poses can be deceptive,” the teacher said. “Not as easy as they seem.”

I love that about yoga. I love that I don’t need an expensive gym membership or fancy equipment or special shoes to build flexibility and strength. I just need my body, my mind, and my spirit.Š

Big on Arms

We are in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II) and the teacher is walking us through the pose nice and slow. She has us begin in Tadasana (Mountain pose) and then tells us to touch our fingertips together in front of our chest. As we jump our legs apart, our arms open up too (so they are parallel to the ground).

Next, the real instruction begins. She focuses on our feet, making sure they are spaced far enough apart and turned in the proper direction. She reminds us that our back heel should be aligned with our front heel.

She pauses as we breathe.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

She moves onto our legs. She makes sure that our right knee is bent so that it’s directly over the right ankle. We need to press our thigh back so we can see our second toe. She keeps us focused on our lower body, giving us directions on our tailbone, butt, and – again – our thighs. She mentions that second toe again.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

You can practically hear the thoughts of every student in the studio: My arms are tired. My arms are so tired! When will this pose be over so we can put our arms down? Are anyone else’s arms tired? Or am I just a wimp? How much longer do we have to hold our arms up?

Finally, the teacher says, “I know your arms are tired.”

Her acknowledgement is a relief even though she encourages us to keep those arms lifted. “Stretch them out even further, reeeaaaaching for the walls,” she says.

She moves onto our shoulder blades – are they scrunched up by our neck? Release them.

Lengthen our torsos.

Broaden our chests.

She knows exactly what we’re doing – allowing our minds to be consumed with thoughts about our arms.

“Your brain starts to panic first,” she says. “Your body is strong and your arms can handle this.”

That’s the extra motivation we need for the last few breaths until she finally has us step our feet back together and place our hands on our hips.

I’m working out in LA for a couple weeks – my old hometown – and it’s great to be back in my favorite teacher’s class. Now that I’m here, I remember she was always big on arms.

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