Category Archives: Indiana DeafTimes

nwitimes.com Members of the Northwest Indiana Deaf Club met for the last time Jan. 12 to celebrate 65 years of service to the deaf community. Some returned from as far away as Indianapolis to mark the occasion. Founded in 1947, the club has been an integral part of … Click here to see more…

93.1 WIBC Indianapolis By Eric Berman () One advocacy group is demanding more deaf people on a panel that will create a new outreach center for deaf children. A battle over whether the deaf should speak or use American Sign Language has raged since the days of … Read More…

Deaf Baseball and Softball Event

The California School for the Deaf in Riverside is hosting the Hoy XII Baseball and Softball Classic on April 27-28.  During this event, teams from Riverside, CA, Fremont, CA, Indiana, Texas, and Maryland will be competing against each other.  

StateImpact Indiana By Kyle Stokes Grant Phillips, who is completely deaf, attends Covenant Christian High School in Indianapolis. Phillips has had a cochlear implant since he was 16 months old, which allows him to hear. The device’s use has been controversial within the … Click here…

Daily Mail By Rachel Quigley Two young deaf students were caught on camera having sex on a school bus while adults and other students were present. Police said the 13-year-old boy and eight-year-old girl were students at the Indiana School for the Deaf in … Click here…

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette INDIANAPOLIS – The Indiana House on Tuesday narrowly accepted final changes to a bill creating a new center for deaf and hearing-impaired Hoosiers meant to give unbiased information on educational options for parents. House Bill 1367 passed 54-36 and … Click here…

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette … go on the Internet, discover a deaf community sharply divided between supporters of oralism and manualism, panic, and somehow decide they’ll embrace the oral camp while never trusting any single living American Sign Language user ever again. Click here…

US Deaf Men’s & Women’s Exhibition Soccer Games

Indianapolis Star The National Association of the Deaf has taken up the cause, and deaf advocates far and wide are watching. That is unfortunate, says Naomi Horton, … Click Here…

Healthier Options

My trip to LA is winding to a close. I’d love to post a couple of healthy new recipes I tried this week, but I haven’t been cooking (unless you consider slicing apple and dipping it in natural peanut butter cooking). Instead, I’ve been eating out more than I intended. But I guess I have re-learned one lesson on this road trip: it never hurts to ask. The other day I was ordering an Ahi tuna burger from one of my favorite spots – a roadside seafood shack. I was sure they didn’t have wheat buns – I looked everywhere for the small print in the menu indicating customers had that choice and couldn’t find it. But when I asked, turns out they could serve their burgers on wheat. And the breakfast place this morning – though the menu doesn’t specify, you can request fruit on the side instead of home fries. Of course options like that aren’t always available. The Chinese place I stopped by the other night didn’t have brown rice as an option – only white. But I’m going to keep asking, cuz you just never know.

The Plan: Finding the Path to Clean Eating

Once I decided to adopt a Clean Eating lifestyle I realized I needed a Plan. ASAP.

I broke my Plan into three parts.

Part One

I read a number of books and browsed websites (including Mercola.com, DrWeil.com, Pritikin.com and EatWasaFeelGood.com (the Best Life page has good snacks/recipes)). Then I sat down Saturday morning and outlined a meals for the week as well as guidelines for eating. In a nutshell: I want to wildly increase my intake of vegetables, drastically decrease my consumption of animal products (a maximum of one serving per day), and eliminate sugar, refined flour, caffeine, and alcohol.

Let me add a disclaimer: I’m not a doctor, a nutritionist, or a dietitian. I am simply a 33-year-old woman trying to eat clean foods after discovering that the third ingredient in my “healthy” cereal was sugar and my 100% whole wheat bread contained high fructose corn syrup. Also, I fully intend to tweak my eating habits as I explore what works for my body.

So – back to the Plan. Some changes would be easy. For example, I already found nearby farms to frequent. Eating locally grown grass-fed chicken would hopefully be smooth sailing. Some changes would be hard. I’ve spent the last few weeks weaning myself off of the very large cup of coffee I drink each morning and replacing it with caffeine-free herbal tea. I miss the aroma of those Kona beans! Some changes I’m still on the fence about, like dairy products. I’ve heard all sorts of arguments and ideas (both pro and con) when it comes to milk, cheese, and eggs. This is going to require more investigation. I’m heading to a farm in Virginia next week to learn more about raw milk.

Part Two

The second part of my plan involved making a list of my ailments. I want to track my physical problems over the course of a year and observe improvements. I’ll spare you the entire litany of conditions, but here are a few:

Eyesight: will drinking fresh homemade vegetable juice and eating clean foods restore my eyesight to the point where my prescription is weakened or obsolete?

Skin Problems: in addition to acne (yes, I’m still breaking out at age 33), my skin doctor is constantly chopping off “suspicious” looking moles. She says they’re benign but she also calls them a not-so-pretty word that I can’t pronounce. I’d love to start getting a clean bill of health during my annual dermatology appointments.

Colds: I’ve heard of people who haven’t had a cold in 30 years. Sign me up. No more colds!

Endometriosis/Infertility: This will be the most personal challege. Endometriosis has not only caused severe physical pain, but has resulted in surgery where the doctor had to remove a cyst the size of a cantaloupe as well as most of my ovary. Plus it has caused problems with fertility. I’m thinking…will Clean Eating restore my hormone balances and clear the way for a healthy pregnancy? We’ll see.

Part Three

The final part of my plan seemed crucial: restaurants. I Googled all the restaurants within 30 miles of my home that serve local, organic fare. Then I taped the list to our refrigerator. If I’m ever too exhausted to cook or if I completely demolish a recipe as I experiment in the kitchen, my husband and I can escape to these spots – one of which is a restaurant that serves vegetarian Indian cuisine. Score!

Downhill

I carefully set out my outfit.

Organized my purse.

Planned breakfast.

Gathered the leash to walk the dog.

And then, finally, set my alarm clock.

As a writer, I’ve been working out of the home for a couple years, but Monday morning I was due in a company’s corporate offices for a six-week, on-site editorial gig. I’m not a morning person at all, so the night before, I needed to prepare.

Food-wise, the first day went okay. I ate fruit and oatmeal for breakfast, had a tuna sandwich in the office’s cafeteria for lunch, and, back home, had enough energy left over to cook a healthy vegetable-based dinner. That was Day 1. The rest of week I watched myself slide downhill. (I’d forgotten how corporate jobs suck every second of your time away – making it hard to prepare fresh meals. Oh, and the sugar. Being Valentine’s week, the chocolate overload running through that office – Oy! I ate too much of it.) By Friday, my fridge was bare (no breakfast fruit), I was still eating tuna for lunch (hello – mercury overload?), and dinner was refined pasta at a restaurant.

My throat felt a little . . . sore. OMG, was I getting a cold? Dang it. I didn’t have a single cold in 2007, and I suspect it was because my immune system was stronger due to better eating habits.

“I haven’t eaten one vegetable today,” I said to Ron Friday night. (I’m not counting a wilted piece of lettuce and green tomato slice on my tuna sandwich as real vegetables).

Saturday morning, as my sinuses clogged and my throat felt worse, I rushed my husband out the door with a grocery list. I juiced vegetables and drank the concoction down in a few gulps. I ate an orange. For lunch, I made a homemade bean soup. I ate another orange. For dinner I made a veggie omelet.

Too late. I officially had a cold. I knew the best thing I could do for myself was rest. I cancelled all weekend plans, and I slept and drank hot tea. In bed Sunday night, I figured I’d be calling in sick the next day. But miraculously, I woke up cured. Again, I blame the vegetables for the quick recovery.

This week I’m doing better (not great, but better) managing the “office” life. Our home fridge is stocked with healthy foods to choose from in the morning, I’m packing my lunch (dark leafy green salad with cranberries, walnuts, and a little goat cheese), and dinner is mapped out (today we’re having a brown rice risotto with asparagus and a mixed greens salad).

I’ll be sure to toast to good health.

Wasa with Poached Salmon, Basil and Tomato

Ingredients

1 filet (3.5 ounces) salmon, poached*
¼ cup sweet grape or cherry tomatoes, sliced
¼ cup thinly sliced scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon (2 to 3 leaves) fresh basil
1 teaspoon fresh oregano
1 tablespoon capers
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons olive oil
3 pieces WASA Fiber Rye crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Mix together in a large bowl, tomatoes, scallions, basil, oregano, capers, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.
Add salmon chunks and mix gently. Serve with WASA on the side of salmon mixture.

TIP: To poach salmon, place in salted, simmering water for 6-7 minutes or until salmon is opaque in center. Do not boil water. Cool and remove skin.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 416 g
Total Fat 25 g
Saturated Fat 5.3 g
Cholesterol 65 mg
Sodium 476 mg
Total Carbohydrate 29 g
Dietary Fiber 9 g
Protein 28 g
Calcium 89 g

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