Category Archives: Illinois DeafTimes

The man reportedly climbed into the sewer around 8:20 p.m. Monday. Darien Patch By Lauren Williamson | Email the author | July 4, 2011 Updated 11:29 p.m. A 20-year-old man deaf man was rescued uninjured Monday night from a sewer near the intersection of Plainfield Road and Fairmount Avenue in unincorporated Downers Grove. Crews from [...]

Click here to see Video Another state considering closing School for the Deaf

Police say DNA helped solve 30-year-old murder Chicago Tribune Niles and Albert belonged to the high school’s drama club for the deaf and the local chapter of the Junior Illinois Association for the Deaf. Prosecutors plan to present statements Niles allegedly made to friends that Albert not only knew about her …

Chicago Sun-TimesBy Lauren FitzPatrick Sun-Times Media May 4, 2011 2:05PM Hinsdale South High School yearbook photos show Dawn Niles and Gary Albert sitting next to one another in group shots for the school’s deaf drama club and its chapter of the Junior Illinois Assocation for the Deaf. Behind the glass doors of one of [...]

Chicago Tribune By Cynthia Dizikes Tribune reporter9:24 a.m. CDT, May 4, 2011 A group of hearing-impaired prisoners are suing the Illinois Department of Corrections, claiming the agency has discriminated against them by refusing to provide interpreters, technological assistance and other alternate forms of communication. The prisoners cannot hear fire alarms and…

CHICAGO, May 4, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ —  A class action lawsuit was filed today in federal district court in Chicago in response to the systemic discrimination by the Illinois Department of Corrections (“IDOC”) and its failure to provide accommodations to deaf and hard of hearing prisoners.  Denials of accommodations include the IDOC’s refusal to provide American [...]

Mark Feder Named 2011 Distinguished Alumnus for NTID

NTID News April 15, 2011 Mark Feder, an entrepreneur from Hawthorn Woods, Ill., has been named NTID Distinguished Alumnus for 2011. Feder owns B.E. Atlas Co., a family-operated wholesale hardware distributor. He also created the National Catalog House of the Deaf (NCHD) which sold assistive devices such as strobe alarms, close-captioned decoders and TTYs. A [...]

By John Silver Apr 11, 2011 01:49PM Light-heavyweight contender Matt Hamill hasn’t allowed his deafness to stand in the way of his UFC dreams. | Mike Groll~AP Matt Hamill is one of the more inspiring athletes you could meet. Born deaf, he overcame countless obstacles to become a three-time NCAA Division III wrestling champion [...]

Gifted RIT/NTID Student Gives Hope, Life, to Others

NTID News – December 14, 2010 Lauren Aggen, an Applied Liberal Arts major at RIT/NTID, wrote a book to express her gratitude to an unknown family who donated their child’s heart to save her life. Photo by Mark Benjamin, NTID. It’s not every college student who can say they’ve had a lifelong wish come true. [...]

BY NATASHA KORECKI Federal Courts Reporter Dec 8, 2010 05:52AM Jake Schutter lost hearing in one ear after he was hit by a ball. It was just another Little League game. The pitcher had just thrown two strikes. But when the next pitch was hurled, the batter smashed it and sent a line drive straight [...]

Scrub-A-Dub-Dub

Here’s a little secret: I practiced yoga for 12 months before I finally washed my mat . . . okay, 18 months . . . um, maybe more like 24. Yep, I’m pretty sure it was over two years before I grabbed a washcloth and filled a bucket with warm soapy water. For the record, my mat wasn’t too dirty. I tend to prefer the Iyengar approach to yoga over styles that involve a heated rooms or a lot of fast movement, so I’m usually not dripping sweat during classes. But despite that, and regardless of how often I’d wash my feet before sessions, I began to notice soiled circles where my heels pressed into the mat. I should wash this, I would think to myself during Downward Facing Dog. Yep that’s definitely dirt, I’d say to myself as I gazed at grime during Plank. After class I would roll up my mat, take it home, and promptly forget my pledge. Finally one day I plunged my hand into a bucket and went to work. It’s very easy. Following these directions, I unrolled my mat on a clean tile surface, washed it with a cloth (two cups of water to four drops of dish soap), and then rinsed it by wiping it down with a damp cloth followed by a dry one. Much better. Next class, I practically felt like I was using a brand new mat. It’s funny – sometimes when I take the time to care for something external, it feels like an internal cleansing.Š

Welcome, Loved One

A few weeks ago I was in Tulum, Mexico for a week of yoga, meditation and silent beach walks. I arrived at night after everyone else had gone to sleep. Inside my cabana two flickering candles revealed a comfy bed draped in mosquito netting with a welcome card on the pillow. I picked up the card and read what was written. Holding it next to my heart I smiled. Then I crawled under the covers and drifted off to sleep.

The next morning as I was journaling in my notebook, I thought about the card and scribbled down what it had said: You are worth loving. I had a funny feeling that what I wrote wasn’t quite right, so I went back to my cabana to double-check. Sure enough, I had misquoted the card. It actually read: I am worth loving.

Notice the difference?

Why is it so easy to believe others are worth loving, but so hard to believe it about ourselves? Why is it difficult to say? To know? To live?

This isn’t a narcissistic kind of love; rather, it’s a “love your neighbor as yourself” kind of love. Eating mindfully, treating ourselves with kindness, practicing yoga — these are ways we can love ourselves by being stewards of our body and soul.

I began practicing yoga years ago after watching my then-boyfriend (now husband) ease into a backbend with grace. To this day I still can’t do that, but it doesn’t matter because self-love is about accepting myself for who I am, not what I can achieve. I will be blogging about yoga twice a week for the Eat Wasa Feel Good team (my partner, Zandria, introduced herself yesterday as the vegan blogger).

So here’s a warm welcome to you, loved one, and an invitation to join me on this journey. Feel free to post comments, questions or ideas. You can also e-mail me or visit my personal blog, Roughly Speaking.

Oh, by the way, my name is Jenny. And I am worth loving.

Retraining Taste Buds

The carrots I hold in my hand are fresh from a local garden. They’re dirty and have wild bushy green tops. I wash and peel the carrots then pick up the knife. I have a long way to go until I can maneuver this utensil like those chefs on the Food Network, but I’m getting better. Faster.

I cut the carrots, chop the onion, dice the celery, slice the mushrooms and throw everything into a skillet with water. While the veggies are steam sautéing I boil tri-colored pasta in a medium pot and steam spinach in a small one. I add tomatoes and tomato sauce to the skillet. When the pasta and spinach are ready I add those too, along with garlic and oregano.

My husband, Ron, wanders in the kitchen.

“What’s for dinner?” he asks.

“Italian Skillet Casserole,” I say.

He leans over my shoulder and investigates the simmering dish on the stovetop.

“Almost all veggies,” I point out.

Cooking healthier foods has been challenging in certain ways, but one thing I completely forgot about when I started this new path is that my husband can’t stand vegetables. He’ll eat certain items (broccoli or beans or salad) because he knows they’re good for him, but he would prefer them as a side dish, not the main dish.

But it just so happens that his company is having a Vegetable Challenge this summer.

So perfect timing.

I scoop out the meal into two bowls, light some candles, and sit down.

It’s delicious, and I look at Ron to see what he thinks. He’s pushing a piece of onion, a hunk of tomato, and a mushroom slice to the side. “I can eat them when they’re small, but these big pieces…” he shakes his head.

“You need to retrain your taste buds,” I suggest softly.

He’s a good sport so he takes a huge spoonful, onion chunks and all, and gives it a go. He likes it. This truly is one of the tastier dishes I’ve made, and when I’m done I push my bowl aside and lean back in the chair.

“Hey, what’s that?” Ron says, peering into my bowl.

“Nothing,” I say.

“Uh-huh,” Ron nods, smirking.

Okay, okay. So I really do consider myself a vegetable lover, but I’ve always struggled with cooked carrots. There is small pile of them left. I guess we both have some retraining to work through.

Germaphobe

The waiter walks over and sets a glass of ice-water on the table.

“Ew,” my mom says when he walks away. “I don’t like it when restaurants put lemons in your drink.”

For years she’s claimed that lemon wedges have tons of bacteria – picked up because of how much they are handled by bare human hands – and this YouTube video seems to prove she’s right, reporting that over 77% of lemon wedges in drinks tested positive for disease causing bacteria.

My husband has an issue with restaurants that place the silverware directly on the table instead of on a napkin or tablecloth. When I tell him the tables are washed, he says, “Yeah, but have you seen those ratty rags they use?”

What a bunch of germaphobes!

Except I have my issues too. I don’t like touching menus. I especially can’t stand it when a waiter places a menu down on top of my plate. I mean really, when are menus cleaned?

I’m totally of the belief that exposure to bad bacteria can build my immune system. And, logically, I know that menus are only one of many places I’m coming across a boatload of germs. But still, menus freak me out.

Do you have any quirky things you’re a germ-freak about?

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