Category Archives: Illinois DeafTimes

The man reportedly climbed into the sewer around 8:20 p.m. Monday. Darien Patch By Lauren Williamson | Email the author | July 4, 2011 Updated 11:29 p.m. A 20-year-old man deaf man was rescued uninjured Monday night from a sewer near the intersection of Plainfield Road and Fairmount Avenue in unincorporated Downers Grove. Crews from [...]

Click here to see Video Another state considering closing School for the Deaf

Police say DNA helped solve 30-year-old murder Chicago Tribune Niles and Albert belonged to the high school’s drama club for the deaf and the local chapter of the Junior Illinois Association for the Deaf. Prosecutors plan to present statements Niles allegedly made to friends that Albert not only knew about her …

Chicago Sun-TimesBy Lauren FitzPatrick Sun-Times Media May 4, 2011 2:05PM Hinsdale South High School yearbook photos show Dawn Niles and Gary Albert sitting next to one another in group shots for the school’s deaf drama club and its chapter of the Junior Illinois Assocation for the Deaf. Behind the glass doors of one of [...]

Chicago Tribune By Cynthia Dizikes Tribune reporter9:24 a.m. CDT, May 4, 2011 A group of hearing-impaired prisoners are suing the Illinois Department of Corrections, claiming the agency has discriminated against them by refusing to provide interpreters, technological assistance and other alternate forms of communication. The prisoners cannot hear fire alarms and…

CHICAGO, May 4, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ —  A class action lawsuit was filed today in federal district court in Chicago in response to the systemic discrimination by the Illinois Department of Corrections (“IDOC”) and its failure to provide accommodations to deaf and hard of hearing prisoners.  Denials of accommodations include the IDOC’s refusal to provide American [...]

Mark Feder Named 2011 Distinguished Alumnus for NTID

NTID News April 15, 2011 Mark Feder, an entrepreneur from Hawthorn Woods, Ill., has been named NTID Distinguished Alumnus for 2011. Feder owns B.E. Atlas Co., a family-operated wholesale hardware distributor. He also created the National Catalog House of the Deaf (NCHD) which sold assistive devices such as strobe alarms, close-captioned decoders and TTYs. A [...]

By John Silver Apr 11, 2011 01:49PM Light-heavyweight contender Matt Hamill hasn’t allowed his deafness to stand in the way of his UFC dreams. | Mike Groll~AP Matt Hamill is one of the more inspiring athletes you could meet. Born deaf, he overcame countless obstacles to become a three-time NCAA Division III wrestling champion [...]

Gifted RIT/NTID Student Gives Hope, Life, to Others

NTID News – December 14, 2010 Lauren Aggen, an Applied Liberal Arts major at RIT/NTID, wrote a book to express her gratitude to an unknown family who donated their child’s heart to save her life. Photo by Mark Benjamin, NTID. It’s not every college student who can say they’ve had a lifelong wish come true. [...]

BY NATASHA KORECKI Federal Courts Reporter Dec 8, 2010 05:52AM Jake Schutter lost hearing in one ear after he was hit by a ball. It was just another Little League game. The pitcher had just thrown two strikes. But when the next pitch was hurled, the batter smashed it and sent a line drive straight [...]

Welcome, Loved One

A few weeks ago I was in Tulum, Mexico for a week of yoga, meditation and silent beach walks. I arrived at night after everyone else had gone to sleep. Inside my cabana two flickering candles revealed a comfy bed draped in mosquito netting with a welcome card on the pillow. I picked up the card and read what was written. Holding it next to my heart I smiled. Then I crawled under the covers and drifted off to sleep.

The next morning as I was journaling in my notebook, I thought about the card and scribbled down what it had said: You are worth loving. I had a funny feeling that what I wrote wasn’t quite right, so I went back to my cabana to double-check. Sure enough, I had misquoted the card. It actually read: I am worth loving.

Notice the difference?

Why is it so easy to believe others are worth loving, but so hard to believe it about ourselves? Why is it difficult to say? To know? To live?

This isn’t a narcissistic kind of love; rather, it’s a “love your neighbor as yourself” kind of love. Eating mindfully, treating ourselves with kindness, practicing yoga — these are ways we can love ourselves by being stewards of our body and soul.

I began practicing yoga years ago after watching my then-boyfriend (now husband) ease into a backbend with grace. To this day I still can’t do that, but it doesn’t matter because self-love is about accepting myself for who I am, not what I can achieve. I will be blogging about yoga twice a week for the Eat Wasa Feel Good team (my partner, Zandria, introduced herself yesterday as the vegan blogger).

So here’s a warm welcome to you, loved one, and an invitation to join me on this journey. Feel free to post comments, questions or ideas. You can also e-mail me or visit my personal blog, Roughly Speaking.

Oh, by the way, my name is Jenny. And I am worth loving.

A Time to Cleanse

Don’t eat anything after 7pm.

I heard that tip on Oprah. The rationale had something to do with losing weight and the fact that it’s easier to burn calories during the day rather than at night when we’re watching TV, reading, or sitting around talking. Part of it sounded reasonable (I guess), but another part of it sounded like a silly rule or restriction that may or may not be good for a person’s particular body. After the show, I forget the tip completely and ate past 7pm a lot.

When I began Clean Eating, I started thinking about that suggestion again. Gradually, I made dinner my final meal of the day and stopped mindless snacking afterwards. My husband and I usually don’t eat until 8pm anyway, but there was another reason why I stuck to the plan: I finally understood the rationale behind Oprah’s tip. Marilyn Polk sums it up nicely in one of the cookbooks I’m reading:

“Our bodies need a chance to cleanse, heal, and rest. Most Americans are so busy poking food into their mouths throughout the day and night that their bodies do not have a chance to cleanse, heal, or rest.”

It’s like the Eagles song based on the bible verse: There is a time for everything. A time to live and a time to die. A time to plant and a time to uproot. The idea of giving my body a time eat – and then later a time to cleanse – made so much sense. Simple. Good. Common sense. And of course, it’s only a guideline. If I’m ravenous after 8pm by all means I will eat something! That makes sense too. Š

Herbs

One of my husbands charms is that if it’s my birthday, or a holiday, or some other gift-giving event, he’ll sneak in a surprise present – a little something extra that wasn’t on my list that he thought of completely on his own. For example, one year he gave me a handheld Ms. Pac-Man game because he knew I used to love Ms. Pac-Man s a kid (one time we came across the video machine in a restaurant, and I went nuts, challenging my husband to round after round until I had blisters).

So this year – after reading and observing me write the Wasa blog, and noticing my developing interest in cooking – he gave me an herb garden. Well, sort of. We don’t have real garden space in our city place, so he gave me a kit that you can assemble right on your countertop.

Mint.
Basil.
Dill.
Cilantro.
Thyme.
Parsley.
Chives.

My mom and I put together this afternoon.

We snapped a light onto the “garden” and popped in the seed pods.

“Can it really be this easy?” I said.

It was.

We added some water, feed it some nutrients, and left it to grow.

It takes about five weeks until the herbs will be ready for harvesting.

First recipe? I’m thinking a garden herb omelet.

Healing Waters

I sink into the water.

Outside, at the hot springs, the air is cool and river still. It smells like sulfur, but after a few minutes I don’t notice. I’m simply lost in the “healing waters.” That’s what they are called because supposedly the minerals in the hot springs help with a number of ailments. Personally, I enjoy the way the heat releases the tension in my body. I especially like soaking my feet – they cramp easily. I also like the heat around the middle of my body – a source of pain between a miscarriage, a surgery, and fertility frustrations over the past 12 months.

I lean back against the stone wall of the bath and watch.

There is a man standing under a waterfall. The water thuds against his back. What is he healing? Tight shoulders? Work stress? Or something deeper . . . the loss of a family member or friend?

In another pool there is a woman with her eyes closed. Maybe she is washing away the pain of divorce. Or abuse. Or a dog named Marley.

I don’t know. I’m just guessing. But when I start thinking about all the different types of “loss” people deal with, it’s clear we all need healing. One of the professors at the university I attended in Southern California just lost his house in the fires. One of my friends just gave birth, a joyful event . . . and a loss of personal time.

Loss of age . . . loss of a job . . . loss of a breast . . . loss of mental agility . . . loss of a city after a move . . . loss of a child who goes off to college . . . and on and on and on it goes.

I read a paragraph in a book the other day about the importance of taking time to heal. The author said that when we step back and heal ourselves we become aware of a world full of people in need. My time of retreat is coming to a close. I hope I don’t go back home and get too wrapped up in schedules and deadlines and the frustrations of city traffic. I hope I can heed the author’s advice and help heal the world in little personal ways. Š

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