Category Archives: Golf DeafTimes

Pono Tokioka of Lihu‘e fired a 73 on Friday to finish fourth overall at the United States Deaf Golf Championships played at The Golf Club at Yankee Trace in Centerville, Ohio. Beth Tokioka, Pono’s mother, is traveling with the Kaua‘i High School golfer and said in an email, if he finishes within the top six, […]

Thirty nine golfers played at the Golf Club at Yankee Trace in Centerville, Ohio last week. The full leaderboard is shown on this link: 2011 US Deaf Golf Champions Full Leaderboard Congratulations to our US golfers.  Good luck to them when they compete at The 10th World Deaf Golf Championships (WDGC), which will be held at […]

Click this link for more information: Flyer 11th – 2011     11th Annual SSDGA Tournament Hosted by Broward County Association of the Deaf October 25, 26, and 27, 2011     Palm Aire Country Club 2600 Palm-Aire Drive North, Pompano Beach, FL 33069 www.palmairegolf.com   Chairman: Alex Fernandez Email:     or VP:

Unique golf camp caters to deaf children The State Journal-Register Rob Strano, lead instructor of United States Deaf Golf Camps, uses sign language to offer tips to children attending a clinic Tuesday at Panther Creek Country Club. By MARCIA MARTINEZ Speaking with their hands and fingers and listening with their eyes, …

June 4, 2011 From: Bernie Brown, USDGA Hall of Fame Chair Re:  Hall of Fame Inductees I am most pleased to report the USDGA Hall of Fame’s selection for the 2011 Hall of Fame inductees.  There will be a Hall of Fame ceremony during the USDGA Golf Championship Tournament in Dayton, Ohio on July 15, […]

The Villages, FL – 10th Annual SSDGA Golf Tourney Results

Find out the results from Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association’s 10th Annual Golf Tourney helded in The Villages, Florida

The Villages, FL – Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Tournament

Interested in Senior Deaf Golf Tournament – Do register now! Tri-County Association of the Deaf Hosts 10th Annual Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association. The deadline is September 1, 2010!

Interested in Senior Golf Tournament for Deaf?

Tri-County Association of the Deaf Hosts 10th Annual Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association

CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT & FREE CONCERT – MAY 17

All in a Day’s Work

The dishes needed washing. There were two huge stacks – one by the sink and another over by the stove. One downside to cooking from scratch.

“All we had was salmon and spinach,” my husband said.

“But the teriyaki marinade* was homemade, remember?” Plus, during lunch, I’d been experimenting with homemade pasta sauce.

The dishes sat overnight. Today, evaluating the mess, I realized the entire kitchen needed attention – countertops, floors, fridge – along with the dining room, family room, and bathrooms.

I’ve never been obsessed with cleaning, but even this mess was grating on me.

On the other hand, it was 60 degrees and sunny outside. And I’ve been waiting for this weather since November.

But then again my parents were coming to visit later in the week, so I knew I really should tidy up.

I wasted 20 minutes debating, which included a phone consultation with my husband:

Him: You should definitely rollerblade – the weather is great.
Me: But I was going to wash all those dishes.
Him: Well, on second thought . . .

And an internal argument over the merits of what it means to be a person who writes about mindful living:

Me: A Zen Master of Cleaning would emphasize the importance of living an “uncluttered” life.
Me: But fresh air and exercise will balance out your day.

In the end I decided to blade. The President’s Challenge is underway and I committed to participating on this very blog . . . so you know . . . rollerblading is part of my job.

~~~

*Teriyaki Sauce from The Maker’s Diet: 1 T fresh, grated ginger; 3 cloves garlic, mashed; 1 T toasted sesame oil; 1 T rice vinegar; 1 T raw honey; ½ cup of soy sauce. Whisk together.

Turkey and Avocado Wasa Sandwich

Ingredients

3 slices Havarti cheese, sliced thin
½ avocado, sliced thin
3 slices turkey breast
1 teaspoon olive oil
¼ cup tomatoes, finely minced
2 tablespoons purple onion, finely minced
1 tablespoon Italian flat leaf parsley, chopped
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
3 pieces WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA Crispbread flavor)

Directions

Combine olive oil, tomatoes, purple onion, parsley, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Mix and set aside.
Place 1 slice of Havarti cheese, 1 slice of turkey breast, 3 thin slices of avocado on each crispbread. Top with tomato and onion mixture.

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 180
Total Fat 9 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 34 mg
Sodium 150 mg
Total Carbohydrate 11 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 13 g
Calcium 10% of daily value

Mix it Up

Staying at our retreat home in the mountains of Colorado has me thinking about water. I constantly see large vehicles with oversized plastic containers strapped into their truck beds, full of water. Water is hauled all over the place. It’s dry out here.

I’ve actually become a bit paranoid about water. What is the healthiest way to drink it? Should I gulp tap water and risk consuming substances like chlorine and fluoride, not to mention whatever else the water might be picking up as it flows through the pipes? Or should I buy water in a bottle and risk consuming leeched chemicals from the plastic, not to mention hurting the environment (plastic water bottles take 1000 years to biodegrade)? And if I do opt for store bought water, what should I purchase? Spring? Distilled? Glacial?

The more I read about water, the more confusing the facts. I find this to be the case with fish too (Eat it – it’s good for you! Don’t eat it – tuna contains mercury, fish handlers get infections when capturing rockfish, etc.!)

Here’s my current theory: instead of devoting myself to one type of water (tap, spring, well) I mix it up. That way, I figure I’ll get a variety of chemicals but (hopefully) in miniscule amounts. I take the same approach with fish. I’ll eat tuna on occasion, but not too often. Same with salmon and shrimp and sole. So that’s my theory and I’m stickin’ to it.  Š

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

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