Category Archives: California DeafTimes

A totally deaf dog who is almost completely blind had been going to a dog park in Santa Maria.  The park ranger at Waller Park said he was too big.  His owner, Marty Niles, said he can’t be around large, aggressive dogs.   

Here are some summer camps for deaf and hard of hearing children, KODA’s, and families: In California: Camp Grizzly – Portola CA  http://www.norcalcenter.org/campgrizzly - For children between the ages of 7 and 15. Lions Camp - http://www.lionswildcamp.org/applications.html - For children between the ages of 7 and 15. In Other States: Colorado – Aspen Camp  See http://www.aspencamp.org/ and http://csdeagles.com/outreach/calnews/2012-13/spring-13.pdf on page 20 for […]

Signing Time Instructor Christine Fitzgerald is proud to announce that Emmy-nominated Rachel Coleman, host of Signing Time, will be performing for children and families in the Hollywood Hills this spring. The Signing Time Foundation Community Event on May 11th will be held at 2:30 p.m. at The Hall of Liberty. The VIP event starts at […]

The Blind Children’s Learning Center is in Santa Ana in Orange County.  They provide services to blind and deaf-blind children.  Their walk on Saturday, May 11, 2013 is a fund-raiser for that learning center.  

The first annual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Wellness Fair will be in Indio (near Palm Springs) on May 16, 2013.  Here is some more info: Announcing the – First Annual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Wellness Fair DATE:    Thursday May 16, 2013    TIME:      4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.   PLACE:  Riverside County Office of Education, 47336 Oasis St., Indio, CA 92201   THERE […]

The Statewide California Association of the Deaf meeting will be at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (CSDR) on Sunday, May 5, 2013 from 9 to 5.  

The Douglas Tilden 5K/10K Walk / Run for Deaf Humanity will be held in San Francisco at the Golden Gate Park on Sunday, June 2, 2013.  If you sign up for the event by May 31st, the registration is $31.00 for adults and $16.00 for teenagers under the age of 18.  If you pay at […]

The Deaf Business Symposium will be held by DCARA in Berkeley on April 19 – April 21, 2013.  It will cover various topics such as networking, goal setting, business law, and negotiating.  The registration fee is $90.00.

A  former teacher and former director of the Center on Deafness – Inland Empire (CODIE) will have a celebration of life at the California School for the Deaf at Riverside on April 13, 2013 starting at 2:00 p.m.  Seymour Bernstein was 80 years old when he  died on February 12, 2013.

A group of students from CSUN won the software competition called, “ ”SS12: Code for a Cause” in San Diego earlier this month.  They designed a phone app alert system for the deaf.  

WASA Turkey Jack Sandwich

Ingredients

1 slice Wasa Multi Grain Crispbread
1 slice of turkey breast
1 slice pepper jack cheese
1 fresh basil leaf

Directions

Layer each ingredient on the Wasa to create an open-faced sandwich. Break/cut into thirds.

Enjoy!

Hearty Vegetable Lentil Soup

We’ve been making this lentil soup* all winter. We finally have it down:

I pour 5 cups of organic, low sodium chicken broth into the big pot.
Ron chops 2 celery stalks, 1 large carrot, and minces 2 cloves of garlic.
I chop 1 medium onion, 1 red pepper, and 1 green pepper. Then measure out 1 cup of dry lentils.

We toss this first batch of ingredients into the pot and stir. Turn on the burner and, after it begins to boil, reduce it to a simmer for 40 minutes.

While it’s cooking, Ron and I are back to the cutting boards.

He’s got 3 red potatoes.
I have 1 zucchini.
He measures out the curry powder and basil (half a teaspoon each).
I measure out a half a cup of organic tomato sauce and drain a can of diced tomatoes.

Our second batch of ingredients goes in the pot for an extra 15 minutes at the end.

We keep sourdough bread in the freezer, and Ron thaws it out and toasts it up so we can dip it in the soup.

So tasty.

It’s the only part of winter I’m gonna miss.

~~~

*recipe from a Pritikin book I found on my parents’ bookshelf

Holidays are Changing

I’m trying to talk my parents and in-laws into coming to our place for Thanksgiving.

Ever since leaving for college at age 18, I’ve traveled over the holidays.

My hubby and I are moving in early November, and we’ll hopefully be settled into our new place by Turkey Day. I’d hate to move in and then turn around and leave right away. Plus, it sounds fun to host the holidays. Of course, I’ve never cooked a Thanksgiving dinner before, but a minor detail, right? I can figure it out.

One year I asked my mom if she’d teach me to cook the turkey. I arrived at her house ready to tackle the bird and learn how to make stuffing. My grandmother was visiting too. The two of them have been taking on Thanksgiving together forever, and despite my good intentions, everyone fell into their normal roles that year. My brother helped mash the potatoes, my dad prepared to carve, I found myself setting the table, pouring the wine, and arranging the relish tray. My mom and grandmother had their own rhythm and didn’t need anyone – including me – butting in. Or maybe I simply got distracted watching whatever movies my brother had rented from the video store. Either way, I never learned how to bake a turkey. (Actually, bake or roast?)

This year will be different. My grandmother no longer travels. One of my brothers is married and will be away. I’ve pegged the local, sustainable farm where I plan to purchase Mr. Tom. (For any vegetarians, here are some recipes I stumbled across on GentleThanksgiving.org).

My parents jumped on the chance to come to my place for a change. I hope my in-laws do too.

Times are changing. Times are changing.

Part of me is nervous about altering the rhythm of our holiday, but I’m excited too.

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

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