Category Archives: Golf DeafTimes

Pono Tokioka of Lihu‘e fired a 73 on Friday to finish fourth overall at the United States Deaf Golf Championships played at The Golf Club at Yankee Trace in Centerville, Ohio. Beth Tokioka, Pono’s mother, is traveling with the Kaua‘i High School golfer and said in an email, if he finishes within the top six, […]

Thirty nine golfers played at the Golf Club at Yankee Trace in Centerville, Ohio last week. The full leaderboard is shown on this link: 2011 US Deaf Golf Champions Full Leaderboard Congratulations to our US golfers.  Good luck to them when they compete at The 10th World Deaf Golf Championships (WDGC), which will be held at […]

Click this link for more information: Flyer 11th – 2011     11th Annual SSDGA Tournament Hosted by Broward County Association of the Deaf October 25, 26, and 27, 2011     Palm Aire Country Club 2600 Palm-Aire Drive North, Pompano Beach, FL 33069 www.palmairegolf.com   Chairman: Alex Fernandez Email:     or VP:

Unique golf camp caters to deaf children The State Journal-Register Rob Strano, lead instructor of United States Deaf Golf Camps, uses sign language to offer tips to children attending a clinic Tuesday at Panther Creek Country Club. By MARCIA MARTINEZ Speaking with their hands and fingers and listening with their eyes, …

June 4, 2011 From: Bernie Brown, USDGA Hall of Fame Chair Re:  Hall of Fame Inductees I am most pleased to report the USDGA Hall of Fame’s selection for the 2011 Hall of Fame inductees.  There will be a Hall of Fame ceremony during the USDGA Golf Championship Tournament in Dayton, Ohio on July 15, […]

The Villages, FL – 10th Annual SSDGA Golf Tourney Results

Find out the results from Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association’s 10th Annual Golf Tourney helded in The Villages, Florida

The Villages, FL – Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Tournament

Interested in Senior Deaf Golf Tournament – Do register now! Tri-County Association of the Deaf Hosts 10th Annual Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association. The deadline is September 1, 2010!

Interested in Senior Golf Tournament for Deaf?

Tri-County Association of the Deaf Hosts 10th Annual Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association

CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT & FREE CONCERT – MAY 17

Where Best to Buy Vardenafil HCl for Sale

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is not an easy condition to develop as this male sexual disorder essentially prevents men from successful engaging in sexual intercourse.  If you have such an erection issue, not only are you not able to enjoy the pleasures experienced during sex, but also means you fail to impart the sexual pleasures that your female partner also desires.  If you have ED and force yourself to have sex, the activity will only lead to frustration, dissatisfaction, and even embarrassment on your part.  After all, the very aspect that makes you a man cannot function normally or properly. Read more…

Acorn Squash Dip with Roasted Pumpkin Seeds on Wasa

Ingredients

2 cups acorn squash, cooked
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons fat free half and half
½ cup diced onion
2 leaves fresh sage
2 teaspoons maple syrup
¼ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons roasted pumpkin seeds
1 package WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread

Directions

Slice open acorn squash and remove seeds. Place sliced side down in an 8 X 8 inch glass dish, cover and microwave on high until tender (approx 10 minutes).
Scoop out meat with a spoon when cooled and set aside.
Heat oil in a skillet. Add onion and whole sage leaves. Sauté until onions are transparent. Remove sage.
Add squash, half and half, maple syrup, and parmesan cheese. Mix well.
Spoon into bowl, sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and serve hot on a platter with crispbread.

TIP: May substitute WASA Oat, Sourdough Rye, Multigrain, or Rye Crispbread. Leftover dip may be stored in refrigerator for to 3 – 4 days.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Serves 6

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 254
Total Fat 6 g
Saturated Fat 6 g
Cholesterol 1 mg
Sodium 257 mg
Total Carbohydrate 52 g
Dietary Fiber 8 g
Protein 6 g
Calcium 57 mg

Big on Arms

We are in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II) and the teacher is walking us through the pose nice and slow. She has us begin in Tadasana (Mountain pose) and then tells us to touch our fingertips together in front of our chest. As we jump our legs apart, our arms open up too (so they are parallel to the ground).

Next, the real instruction begins. She focuses on our feet, making sure they are spaced far enough apart and turned in the proper direction. She reminds us that our back heel should be aligned with our front heel.

She pauses as we breathe.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

She moves onto our legs. She makes sure that our right knee is bent so that it’s directly over the right ankle. We need to press our thigh back so we can see our second toe. She keeps us focused on our lower body, giving us directions on our tailbone, butt, and – again – our thighs. She mentions that second toe again.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

You can practically hear the thoughts of every student in the studio: My arms are tired. My arms are so tired! When will this pose be over so we can put our arms down? Are anyone else’s arms tired? Or am I just a wimp? How much longer do we have to hold our arms up?

Finally, the teacher says, “I know your arms are tired.”

Her acknowledgement is a relief even though she encourages us to keep those arms lifted. “Stretch them out even further, reeeaaaaching for the walls,” she says.

She moves onto our shoulder blades – are they scrunched up by our neck? Release them.

Lengthen our torsos.

Broaden our chests.

She knows exactly what we’re doing – allowing our minds to be consumed with thoughts about our arms.

“Your brain starts to panic first,” she says. “Your body is strong and your arms can handle this.”

That’s the extra motivation we need for the last few breaths until she finally has us step our feet back together and place our hands on our hips.

I’m working out in LA for a couple weeks – my old hometown – and it’s great to be back in my favorite teacher’s class. Now that I’m here, I remember she was always big on arms.

Open My Heart

How many times have I been in Dandasana (Staff Pose) during a yoga class and listened to the teacher say, Open your chest? Same with Trikonasana (Triangle Pose) and many, many other poses.

My friend and fellow blogger Michelle of Full Soul Ahead was in a guided meditation when she heard the teacher say, “We often hunch our shoulders as a way to protect our hearts.” Michelle blogged about the symbolic meaning of that tendency over here: Open Heart. A beautiful post and well worth checking out.

Not that long ago I was reading Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert and came across the passage where a recovering addict had prayed continuously that God would open his heart. When the man was rushed to the hospital for surgery, he remembered thinking, God, I didn’t mean literally! (The story goes something like that – I don’t have the book with me to look it up).

Anyway. Open my heart, God. What a great prayer. I realized today that it’s so much easier to “open my heart” when things are going well. When life is good, my work is being published, my husband and I are laughing together, and the sun is shining, it’s so easy to take a big breath and stand up tall and let my chest expand and be graceful and appreciative and joyful towards others and towards the world.

But when dark times come…oh, those are the moments where I tend to get frustrated or angry and want to quit. But I think maybe it’s during those times when the heart needs to open up and grow most of all.

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