Category Archives: Golf DeafTimes

Pono Tokioka of Lihu‘e fired a 73 on Friday to finish fourth overall at the United States Deaf Golf Championships played at The Golf Club at Yankee Trace in Centerville, Ohio. Beth Tokioka, Pono’s mother, is traveling with the Kaua‘i High School golfer and said in an email, if he finishes within the top six, […]

Thirty nine golfers played at the Golf Club at Yankee Trace in Centerville, Ohio last week. The full leaderboard is shown on this link: 2011 US Deaf Golf Champions Full Leaderboard Congratulations to our US golfers.  Good luck to them when they compete at The 10th World Deaf Golf Championships (WDGC), which will be held at […]

Click this link for more information: Flyer 11th – 2011     11th Annual SSDGA Tournament Hosted by Broward County Association of the Deaf October 25, 26, and 27, 2011     Palm Aire Country Club 2600 Palm-Aire Drive North, Pompano Beach, FL 33069 www.palmairegolf.com   Chairman: Alex Fernandez Email:     or VP:

Unique golf camp caters to deaf children The State Journal-Register Rob Strano, lead instructor of United States Deaf Golf Camps, uses sign language to offer tips to children attending a clinic Tuesday at Panther Creek Country Club. By MARCIA MARTINEZ Speaking with their hands and fingers and listening with their eyes, …

June 4, 2011 From: Bernie Brown, USDGA Hall of Fame Chair Re:  Hall of Fame Inductees I am most pleased to report the USDGA Hall of Fame’s selection for the 2011 Hall of Fame inductees.  There will be a Hall of Fame ceremony during the USDGA Golf Championship Tournament in Dayton, Ohio on July 15, […]

The Villages, FL – 10th Annual SSDGA Golf Tourney Results

Find out the results from Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association’s 10th Annual Golf Tourney helded in The Villages, Florida

The Villages, FL – Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Tournament

Interested in Senior Deaf Golf Tournament – Do register now! Tri-County Association of the Deaf Hosts 10th Annual Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association. The deadline is September 1, 2010!

Interested in Senior Golf Tournament for Deaf?

Tri-County Association of the Deaf Hosts 10th Annual Senior Sunshine Deaf Golfers Association

CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT & FREE CONCERT – MAY 17

Bring It On

I’m about to fall asleep when my husband, Ron, reaches out and shakes my shoulder.

“Are you awake?” he asks.

“Yes,” I say.

“What do you want for your birthday?”

“Hmmm,” I say. “I don’t know. Let me think about it.”

But I do know. I’m debating between various brands of juicers (Green Star or Omega – any thoughts?). Ron is going to keel over when he hears this. In the six years we’ve been together, I’ve never asked for a single item relating to the kitchen.

Not a pot.

Not a pan.

Not a knife, a spatula, or a whisk.

Growing up, I never learned how to cook. My girlfriends and I — we were women of a new generation. We were going to be doctors, lawyers, and mathematicians (and we are). There would be no time for preparing meals. (I’m not sure what our eating plan was — hired help? fast food? — we didn’t think about that part). I do vaguely recall taking a Home Economics course in high school. Men were required to take it too. We baked a pie. I stared at the aluminum container holding the crust and debated between leaving it or removing it. I wasn’t sure aluminum should go in the oven so I took it off. My pie looked more like a pancake.

People change, though.

Now I see our kitchen in a whole new light. Cooking spinach lasagna the other night, I sipped a glass of wine and turned on some tunes. I had to call my mother — twice — and ask her whether I was supposed to cook the whole wheat lasagna noodles or layer them in the dish uncooked. (The first time she said, “Cook ‘em!” and the second time she said, “Yes, I’m positive. Cook ‘’em!”) I cooked the noodles. The food was delicious. I’m no longer intimidated by the kitchen. Bring on the juicer! Š

The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

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Erectile dysfunction (ED) is not an easy condition to develop as this male sexual disorder essentially prevents men from successful engaging in sexual intercourse.  If you have such an erection issue, not only are you not able to enjoy the pleasures experienced during sex, but also means you fail to impart the sexual pleasures that your female partner also desires.  If you have ED and force yourself to have sex, the activity will only lead to frustration, dissatisfaction, and even embarrassment on your part.  After all, the very aspect that makes you a man cannot function normally or properly. Read more…

Male Impotence – How Serious Is It?

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Male impotence or erectile dysfunction (ED) is not exactly a serious condition when put in the context of life-threatening.  No, male impotence is in no way this serious.  However, what makes this condition serious for every man that has it is that part of what makes them a man and mostly their main asset that provides them satisfaction and relief from sexual urges is no longer functioning properly.  This is because penile erection is needed to perform sexual intercourse successfully.  Otherwise, vaginal penetration is not possible.

The truth is male impotence is not a rare condition as nearly one in five men will have or experience it with some varying points of severity.  The problem with this condition though is that, like it or not, if you are a man who is very sexually active, it is an embarrassing condition.  In fact, most men with ED prefer not to discuss it with other men, even friends for that matter.  They usually keep the condition either to just themselves, or with their partners and personal doctor.  There have even been cases where the breakup of couples is due to the male not being able to provide the sexual needs of the female.  Such is the dilemma of men with ED. Read more…

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