Author Archives: Ray

October flyer

We’re thrilled to announce more sign-language-interpreted Shabbat Morning Services, and we hope that you can join us! ********** WHAT: A Service with full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets) WHEN: 10:00 AM — 12:30 PM on Saturdays, October 19th & November 9th WHERE: Town & Village (T&V) Synagogue (www.tandv.org), 334 East 14th Street, between […]

—————————————————————————————- http://www.RSDeaf.org/Adventures   Rochester School for the Deaf presents 21st ANNUAL ADVENTURES IN EDUCATION   TODD HUSTON: “MORE THAN MOUNTAINS“ October 16-17, 2013   Get ready to be truly inspired by Todd Huston – a uniquely brave and humble individual, who has overcome incredible challenges to achieve his goals and make his dreams come true. […]

– RRCD1564 Lyell Ave Rochester, NY 14606 Email: Please check our calendar. www.RochesterDeafClub.com

Ocean Deaf Club, Inc.  Saturday, October 19th   Lingo Game *   The Presbyterian Church  101 Orchard Street, Lakehurst, NJ (Union Avenue & Pine Street)    Doors Open at 6:30pm The game will start around 7:30 pm Members: $10.00 Non-Members: $12.00 * Wear Black & Orange for a special Halloween Prize If you bring homemade or store bought dessert, […]

Volunteer Opportunity: Rochester School for the Deaf is hosting this year’s Gallaudet University Northeastern Region Academic Bowl, December 5-7. Eighteen high school teams of deaf/hard-of-hearing students from across the Northeast will converge on the RSD campus for this momentous event. There is a need for as many as 50 volunteers! and we are now recruiting and […]

Northwest Jersey Association of the Deaf would let you know that ASL Storytelling Event on Oct 5th is cancelled due to insufficient attendees. We will host it sometime in the spring. We will keep you posted. If you already paid to attend, the money will return to you.

October 10, 2013 Thursday 2 – 3:15 in LBJ 2590 De’VIA artists – Nancy Rourke & Ellen Mansfield: From Deafhood to Artivism October 11 – 12, 2013 Friday and Saturday Deaf View / Image Artists (De’VIA) Marketplace Dyer Arts Center, LBJ Meet and buy art from Janna Dahl, Hinda Kasher, Ellen Mansfield, Nancy Rourke, Jackie […]

The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, Sportsman Education Program announces a Hunter Education class that we are offering that will have an ASL interpreter present. Hunter Education is required for anyone who want to hunt for the first time.   These classes are available to anyone 11 yrs old and older (one must be 12 to hunt in […]

Ocean Deaf Club 2013 HOLIDAY FLYER-1

Tadalafil – Branded or Generic?

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is easily the worst woe that a man will ever encounter as he no longer has the capacity to please both himself and his partner.  Fortunately, ED medications are aplenty with tadalafil being the most popular amongst couples.  However, when it comes to buying ED medications, is it better to go for branded or generic?

If you are not familiar with generic drugs, the name that identifies a generic drug is usually the active ingredient that the treatment has.  For generic tadalafil, it means that tadalafil is the active ingredient of the drug.  Usually, generic drugs are derived from branded drugs, the likes that had spent a lot of money in the research and development of the medication.  Normally, they are given several years of rights as sole maker and distributor of the drug to make up for the cost of the drug’s R&D.  In the case of generic tadalafil, it is Eli Lilly that did research as well as manufacturing of the drug Cialis – the branded version of generic tadalafil.  Like all drugs though, no manufacturer has sole rights to the making and distribution of the medication for a very long time which is why the ingredients used in the making of the drug are released and generic drug manufacturers are able to copy them and resell the drug for their own, provided of course they pay royalty as well as sell the drug only as generic in name. Read more…

Remembering the Golden Rule

When we lived in California my husband and I had two bamboo plants – one on our coffee table and one in our kitchen. We had an indoor ivy plant above a corner piece in the living room. And we had a peace lily in a large flowerpot by our front door.

We enjoyed our plants. They livened up our space and added a splash of color.

We even named them: Lucky, Frogger, Stan and Lily.

But we weren’t very organized about feeding them. Half the time we presumed the other person had watered them when in reality neither of us had (we’d check and then panic because their soil was extra dry). Other times we assumed the other person had forgotten to take care of the plants, so we’d both wind up watering them and then over-saturating their soil.

We had a confusing schedule with our dog too. Some days we decided to give her one scoop of food in the morning and another scoop at night. Other days we decide to give her nothing in the morning and two scoops at night. And everyday we’d have a discussion about who fed her, when we fed her, and whether she needed to be fed again. When we moved from California we gave our plants away but kept the dog. Our daily discussions over the feeding routine of our adorable mutt have continued.

We’ve often said to each other: “We need to come up with one schedule for the plants/pets and stick to it.” But no plan we thought of worked very well. Right about the time I was making the switch to Clean Eating. I read an article that suggested feeding your pets and plants before you prepare your own meals.

In other words, serve others before serving yourself.

What a great idea. After all, when I was growing up the golden rule at the dinner table was Offer the food dishes to others before taking it yourself. One summer I worked at a camp where we actually served the person to our right – I would put a piece of chicken, a spoon of broccoli, and a roll on my neighbor’s plate. Then that person would serve the person to her right, and so on…

Feeding pets and plants before meals would not only keep all the living creatures in our household on a regular schedule, it would help us transition into the intention of mindful eating. By stepping back and taking care of the needs of others first, we are reminded of how much has been given to us: our health, our bodies, and the food we are about to put inside it.

Peace & Blessings. Š

Do I Knead a Bread Machine?

Bread.

The staple of life.

Now that I’ve gotten used to making my own fresh vegetable juice, I’m thinking of bread. I recall reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle a few months ago and coming across a passage by the author’s husband (Steven Hopp) who makes a fresh loaf practically everyday.

He says, “I know you’ve got one around somewhere: maybe in the closet. Or on the kitchen counter, so dusty nobody remembers it’s there. A bread machine.”

A bread machine? Nope, don’t have one in the closet or on the counter or anywhere. I’m lucky if I can find a spatula in our kitchen. During a party this spring, I was talking with the host’s mother. She’s in her late 80s and makes her own bread. I told her I wanted to learn so I could make homemade pizza dough, whole wheat, pumpernickel, etc.

“But I don’t have a bread machine,” I said.

She practically fell out of her chair laughing. I guess if you really know how to make bread the old fashioned way, you knead the dough. By hand. For a long time.

“You have to feel the dough to make sure it’s right,” she said.

Call me crazy, but kneading dough by hand actually sounds fun. I think I’ll try it (although I have no idea what it’s supposed to “feel” like, so I’ll have to wing that part). In the meantime, I’ll keep my eye out at garage sales for someone else’s barely-used, dusty bread machine.

Internet Yoga

Yoga has gone high tech.

In the last few weeks I’ve come across three different websites offering “online” yoga classes.

Core Power Yoga (click “yoga on demand”)

Yoga Today (offering “outdoor” yoga classes)

&

Jiva Diva (scroll down to “live classes”)

All three sites give free classes or trial runs. I’m seriously considering trying one out because I’m about to head to Colorado for a mountain retreat for two weeks. The last time I was on retreat I found a gem of a yoga teacher who gave 90 minute private lessons out of her home for $25 (talk about a deal!). But she’s now home-schooling her kids and doesn’t have time for another student (me).

So…I’m thinking of logging on to my computer for Downward-Facing Dog time. But after debating which site to try, I actually decided that instead of Internet classes, I am going to take this time to better develop my own home practice. Tune-in next week to see if I can recall the sequence for Sun Salutations and figure out how to move into Trikonasana (Triangle Pose) without my yoga teacher prodding me to firm my thighs. I’m looking forward to rolling out my mat by my bedside and trusting myself and my practice (okay, I might bring a book of poses for a little cheat sheet, but mostly I’ll be on my own).Š

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