Author Archives: California

The Deaf Seniors of America will have their Conference and activities prior to the Conference in Baltimore from August 21st through August 27th this year.   If you pay for combo tickets before July 31st, you can save money.  

A totally deaf dog who is almost completely blind had been going to a dog park in Santa Maria.  The park ranger at Waller Park said he was too big.  His owner, Marty Niles, said he can’t be around large, aggressive dogs.   

Here are some summer camps for deaf and hard of hearing children, KODA’s, and families: In California: Camp Grizzly – Portola CA  http://www.norcalcenter.org/campgrizzly - For children between the ages of 7 and 15. Lions Camp - http://www.lionswildcamp.org/applications.html - For children between the ages of 7 and 15. In Other States: Colorado – Aspen Camp  See http://www.aspencamp.org/ and http://csdeagles.com/outreach/calnews/2012-13/spring-13.pdf on page 20 for […]

Signing Time Instructor Christine Fitzgerald is proud to announce that Emmy-nominated Rachel Coleman, host of Signing Time, will be performing for children and families in the Hollywood Hills this spring. The Signing Time Foundation Community Event on May 11th will be held at 2:30 p.m. at The Hall of Liberty. The VIP event starts at […]

The Blind Children’s Learning Center is in Santa Ana in Orange County.  They provide services to blind and deaf-blind children.  Their walk on Saturday, May 11, 2013 is a fund-raiser for that learning center.  

The first annual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Wellness Fair will be in Indio (near Palm Springs) on May 16, 2013.  Here is some more info: Announcing the – First Annual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Wellness Fair DATE:    Thursday May 16, 2013    TIME:      4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.   PLACE:  Riverside County Office of Education, 47336 Oasis St., Indio, CA 92201   THERE […]

The Statewide California Association of the Deaf meeting will be at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside (CSDR) on Sunday, May 5, 2013 from 9 to 5.  

The Douglas Tilden 5K/10K Walk / Run for Deaf Humanity will be held in San Francisco at the Golden Gate Park on Sunday, June 2, 2013.  If you sign up for the event by May 31st, the registration is $31.00 for adults and $16.00 for teenagers under the age of 18.  If you pay at […]

Summer Institute at CSUN

California State University, Northridge will hold its 6th Summer Institute from June 17-21 and June 24-28, 2013.  It will be sponsored by the National Institute on Deafness (NCOD).  Early bird rates are offered between now and May 17, 2013, and they are offering 40 hours of courses for $400.00.  They will have classes such as […]

ADARA Conference To Be Held in Minneapolis, Minnesota

The American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association (ADARA) is having their conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 29 to June 1, 2013.  The conference theme is “Blazing New Trails.”  They will have workshops in mental health/chemical dependency, rehabilitation, transition/independent living, and professional development.  The early bird registration fee for the whole conference is $325.00.

Chilling Out with Forward Bends

I glanced at a weather map of the United States today and it’s orange, darker orange, and red all over. In other words, it’s hot.

I tend to have a high tolerance for 90 degree weather, so I revel in it, but my yoga teacher says the heat makes a lot of people irritable.

She thought we should focus on cooling poses in class today.

We worked on variations of Downward Facing Dog – using a chair, then a wall, then the regular way – and then spent some time in Child’s Pose, Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend), and Paschimottanasana (Seated Forward Bend*).

“Forward bend poses are great for settling you down when you’re feeling agitated,” the teacher said. “You may sweat while you’re in the pose, but they’re calming on the nervous system.”

I must say, it is amazing how as the class continued I felt myself grow into silence as I streeeeeetched out, my heart resting peacefully inside.

So if you find yourself snapping at people (including yourself) or not tolerating the traffic or noticing that things that you usually don’t mind are bugging you, take heart. It might simply be the heat. Try breathing a few times . . . and don’t forget to bend.

*In Seated Forward Bend, I have to sit on two blankets and lasso a strap around the balls of my feet to hang onto and pull myself forward because I can’t reach my arms to my toes. The teacher looks just like the lady in this picture when she’s in the pose, but she mentioned that 18 years ago she had to use blankets and straps too. So. By my calculations I should be able to do Seated Forward Bend without props in 15 years. I wasn’t discouraged by this. I was excited. The human body is amazing. Anyway, I’m pretty sure you’re not supposed to think about those things in yoga class, but sometimes I can’t help it!   

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

Wasa with Poached Salmon, Basil and Tomato

Ingredients

1 filet (3.5 ounces) salmon, poached*
¼ cup sweet grape or cherry tomatoes, sliced
¼ cup thinly sliced scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon (2 to 3 leaves) fresh basil
1 teaspoon fresh oregano
1 tablespoon capers
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons olive oil
3 pieces WASA Fiber Rye crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Mix together in a large bowl, tomatoes, scallions, basil, oregano, capers, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.
Add salmon chunks and mix gently. Serve with WASA on the side of salmon mixture.

TIP: To poach salmon, place in salted, simmering water for 6-7 minutes or until salmon is opaque in center. Do not boil water. Cool and remove skin.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 416 g
Total Fat 25 g
Saturated Fat 5.3 g
Cholesterol 65 mg
Sodium 476 mg
Total Carbohydrate 29 g
Dietary Fiber 9 g
Protein 28 g
Calcium 89 g

The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

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