Job: Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Gallaudet University

Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Department:  Communication Studies/Technology Access Program

Responsibilities:

This is a tenure track position for a faculty member whose primary area of responsibility is research (at the investigator or principal investigator level), acquisition and management of research grants, and supervision of staff and students toward effective completion of research and related outcomes.  The focus of the research is accessibility and usability of communication technologies by deaf and hard of hearing people. The teaching load of this position, while it may vary depending on the research load, is one course per year.  Responsibilities include assuming project responsibilities and management in the conduct of a grant already underway in this department (Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Telecommunications Access, 2009-2014).  This RERC project is a subgrant from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Trace R&D Center, and is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.  For an overview of the center grant, see:  http://trace.wisc.edu/news/archives/000263.php

Rank and salary at time of appointment will be commensurate with qualifications and experience, at assistant professor or above.  Credit for time in rank and progress toward tenure may be awarded at the time of hire, depending on qualifications.  Due to the heavy emphasis on sponsored research in a center-grant environment, this is an 11-month appointment.

Background:

The Technology Access Program (TAP) has been a thriving endeavor of Gallaudet University since 1985.  The program has had ongoing sponsored program (grant) support throughout its existence, as well as support from Gallaudet University through the faculty appointment of its director.  The program currently consists of the faculty director and 2.75 experienced research staff, whose time is divided among three grants (the RERC on Telecommunications Access, the RERC on Hearing Enhancement, a project of Gallaudet’s Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences; and the Visual Languages and Learning Science of Learning Center), as well as teaching of undergraduate courses.  On average, two students per year, usually one graduate and one undergraduate student, work in the TAP as well.  Members of TAP have received numerous awards for their contribution to accessibility of communications.  The program is highly collaborative, interdisciplinary, efficient, and outcome-oriented.  TAP is part of the undergraduate Department of Communication Studies and the director is a faculty member in that department.  http://tap.gallaudet.edu.

Qualifications:

  1. Ph.D. with research orientation.  Because this is an interdisciplinary center, we are open to considering candidates with a range of educational backgrounds (e.g., engineering, psychology/human factors, management-related advanced degrees, public policy), if the candidate has proven track record of active research and publication prior to application and meets the other qualifications.
  1. Communication competence in ASL that is sufficient for conversation is necessary to begin work in this position, and a commitment to rapid improvement in signing skills is essential if the candidate is not fully fluent at time of hire.  Note that to acquire tenure at Gallaudet, faculty must pass a proficiency exam in American Sign Language.
  1. Evidence of strong interest in the accessibility of society to people who are deaf and hard of hearing, and strong knowledge in this area.
  1. Evidence of participation in acquisition of sponsorship for university research.

Other characteristics desirable in a candidate:

  1. Evidence of success in acquisition of grants through independent securing of grant(s) or contribution to writing of grants.
  1. Evidence of competency in teaching at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  1. Evidence of supervisory and/or mentoring ability.
  1. Evidence of management competency.
  1. Evidence of collaborative work, e.g., with consumers, industry, university personnel, and government personnel.

Application deadline: We will begin reviewing applications immediately and will continue to receive and review applications until the position is filled.

Starting date:  August 15, 2010.

To apply: Send a letter of application, curriculum vita, graduate transcript, and contact information for three references.  The letter of application must make reference to the applicant’s experience with American Sign Language to date.  The application will be screened and interviews may be conducted prior to receipt of the transcript, but the transcript is required before a final decision will be made.  Send these to:

Dr. Judy Harkins, Director

Technology Access Program

Gallaudet University

800 Florida Avenue, NE

SLCC 1116

Washington, DC 20002

Gallaudet University serves deaf and hard of hearing students from many different backgrounds and seeks to develop a workforce that reflects the diversity of its student body. Gallaudet is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action employer and actively encourages deaf, hard of hearing, members of traditionally underrepresented groups, people with disabilities, women, and veterans to apply for open positions.

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Wasa with Ricotta Cheese, Pistachio and Raisin Spread

Ingredients

½ cup skim ricotta cheese
1 teaspoon honey
2 teaspoon raisins
4 teaspoons pistachios, shelled and chopped
½ ounce dark chocolate, grated
3 pieces WASA Light Rye

Directions

Soak raisins in a bowl of boiling water until soft (approximately 10 minutes). Drain and return to bowl.
Add ricotta cheese, honey and pistachio nuts to bowl. Mix well.
Spoon equal amounts of spread on crispbreads and top with grated chocolate.

TIP: Substitute cottage cheese for ricotta cheese if desired.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 149
Total Fat 7 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 13 mg
Sodium 113 mg
Total Carbohydrate 5 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Protein 7 g
Calcium 13% of required daily value

Finding Flexibility in Inflexibility

Week 2 of my six-week stint at a newspaper is coming to a close. Four more weeks to go. It’s a blessing, as a freelancer, to have the opportunity to be a part of these projects (steady work! money! live interaction with creatures other than my dog!). But man, the corporate life wipes me out.

I get home from work about 7:30 p.m., make dinner, eat, and plop into bed by 9:00 p.m., exhausted, where I drag my laptop on my lap and spend another couple of hours swaying between vegging out and trying to keep up with my other assignments. The evening yoga class I’d planned to attend? Skipped again.

The other night during one of my zombie-like states, I was flipping through Yoga Journal magazine. The question of the month just so happened to be from a reader who wants to dedicate more time to a yoga practice but finds that work leaves little time or energy to do so.

The yogi who answered the reader question suggested three options (1) back off of a less fulfilling activity and replace it with yoga; (2) spend less time working and more time practicing (which probably means adjusting your standard of living since you’ll presumably make less money if you cut back on work); or (3) make yoga a priority in your free time.

For now I’m choosing option three — switching to a weekend yoga class instead of trying to cram a class in after work when I’m tired and hungry.

Do you have an inflexible schedule that makes practicing yoga more challenging? How do you adjust?

Wilted Spinach Salad with Raisins, Pine Nuts, and Walnuts

Ingredients

1 tablespoon raisins
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon pine nuts
½ bag (4.5 ounces) fresh baby spinach
1 clove garlic, crushed
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 pieces WASA Fiber Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA Variety)

Directions

Soak raisins in a small bowl with boiling water for 10 minutes. Drain and set aside.
Heat olive oil in a 12 inch skillet. Add pine nuts, garlic and sauté until garlic turns yellow.
Add spinach and cook for 2 to 3 minutes until spinach is slightly wilted. Add raisins and toss.
Serve on platter with WASA on side or crumble WASA crispbread into salad.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 250
Total Fat 18 g
Saturated Fat 1.8 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 253 mg
Total Carbohydrate 23 g
Dietary Fiber 16 g
Protein 7 g
Calcium 109

Downhill

I carefully set out my outfit.

Organized my purse.

Planned breakfast.

Gathered the leash to walk the dog.

And then, finally, set my alarm clock.

As a writer, I’ve been working out of the home for a couple years, but Monday morning I was due in a company’s corporate offices for a six-week, on-site editorial gig. I’m not a morning person at all, so the night before, I needed to prepare.

Food-wise, the first day went okay. I ate fruit and oatmeal for breakfast, had a tuna sandwich in the office’s cafeteria for lunch, and, back home, had enough energy left over to cook a healthy vegetable-based dinner. That was Day 1. The rest of week I watched myself slide downhill. (I’d forgotten how corporate jobs suck every second of your time away – making it hard to prepare fresh meals. Oh, and the sugar. Being Valentine’s week, the chocolate overload running through that office – Oy! I ate too much of it.) By Friday, my fridge was bare (no breakfast fruit), I was still eating tuna for lunch (hello – mercury overload?), and dinner was refined pasta at a restaurant.

My throat felt a little . . . sore. OMG, was I getting a cold? Dang it. I didn’t have a single cold in 2007, and I suspect it was because my immune system was stronger due to better eating habits.

“I haven’t eaten one vegetable today,” I said to Ron Friday night. (I’m not counting a wilted piece of lettuce and green tomato slice on my tuna sandwich as real vegetables).

Saturday morning, as my sinuses clogged and my throat felt worse, I rushed my husband out the door with a grocery list. I juiced vegetables and drank the concoction down in a few gulps. I ate an orange. For lunch, I made a homemade bean soup. I ate another orange. For dinner I made a veggie omelet.

Too late. I officially had a cold. I knew the best thing I could do for myself was rest. I cancelled all weekend plans, and I slept and drank hot tea. In bed Sunday night, I figured I’d be calling in sick the next day. But miraculously, I woke up cured. Again, I blame the vegetables for the quick recovery.

This week I’m doing better (not great, but better) managing the “office” life. Our home fridge is stocked with healthy foods to choose from in the morning, I’m packing my lunch (dark leafy green salad with cranberries, walnuts, and a little goat cheese), and dinner is mapped out (today we’re having a brown rice risotto with asparagus and a mixed greens salad).

I’ll be sure to toast to good health.

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