Job: Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Gallaudet University

Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Department:  Communication Studies/Technology Access Program

Responsibilities:

This is a tenure track position for a faculty member whose primary area of responsibility is research (at the investigator or principal investigator level), acquisition and management of research grants, and supervision of staff and students toward effective completion of research and related outcomes.  The focus of the research is accessibility and usability of communication technologies by deaf and hard of hearing people. The teaching load of this position, while it may vary depending on the research load, is one course per year.  Responsibilities include assuming project responsibilities and management in the conduct of a grant already underway in this department (Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Telecommunications Access, 2009-2014).  This RERC project is a subgrant from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Trace R&D Center, and is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.  For an overview of the center grant, see:  http://trace.wisc.edu/news/archives/000263.php

Rank and salary at time of appointment will be commensurate with qualifications and experience, at assistant professor or above.  Credit for time in rank and progress toward tenure may be awarded at the time of hire, depending on qualifications.  Due to the heavy emphasis on sponsored research in a center-grant environment, this is an 11-month appointment.

Background:

The Technology Access Program (TAP) has been a thriving endeavor of Gallaudet University since 1985.  The program has had ongoing sponsored program (grant) support throughout its existence, as well as support from Gallaudet University through the faculty appointment of its director.  The program currently consists of the faculty director and 2.75 experienced research staff, whose time is divided among three grants (the RERC on Telecommunications Access, the RERC on Hearing Enhancement, a project of Gallaudet’s Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences; and the Visual Languages and Learning Science of Learning Center), as well as teaching of undergraduate courses.  On average, two students per year, usually one graduate and one undergraduate student, work in the TAP as well.  Members of TAP have received numerous awards for their contribution to accessibility of communications.  The program is highly collaborative, interdisciplinary, efficient, and outcome-oriented.  TAP is part of the undergraduate Department of Communication Studies and the director is a faculty member in that department.  http://tap.gallaudet.edu.

Qualifications:

  1. Ph.D. with research orientation.  Because this is an interdisciplinary center, we are open to considering candidates with a range of educational backgrounds (e.g., engineering, psychology/human factors, management-related advanced degrees, public policy), if the candidate has proven track record of active research and publication prior to application and meets the other qualifications.
  1. Communication competence in ASL that is sufficient for conversation is necessary to begin work in this position, and a commitment to rapid improvement in signing skills is essential if the candidate is not fully fluent at time of hire.  Note that to acquire tenure at Gallaudet, faculty must pass a proficiency exam in American Sign Language.
  1. Evidence of strong interest in the accessibility of society to people who are deaf and hard of hearing, and strong knowledge in this area.
  1. Evidence of participation in acquisition of sponsorship for university research.

Other characteristics desirable in a candidate:

  1. Evidence of success in acquisition of grants through independent securing of grant(s) or contribution to writing of grants.
  1. Evidence of competency in teaching at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  1. Evidence of supervisory and/or mentoring ability.
  1. Evidence of management competency.
  1. Evidence of collaborative work, e.g., with consumers, industry, university personnel, and government personnel.

Application deadline: We will begin reviewing applications immediately and will continue to receive and review applications until the position is filled.

Starting date:  August 15, 2010.

To apply: Send a letter of application, curriculum vita, graduate transcript, and contact information for three references.  The letter of application must make reference to the applicant’s experience with American Sign Language to date.  The application will be screened and interviews may be conducted prior to receipt of the transcript, but the transcript is required before a final decision will be made.  Send these to:

Dr. Judy Harkins, Director

Technology Access Program

Gallaudet University

800 Florida Avenue, NE

SLCC 1116

Washington, DC 20002

Gallaudet University serves deaf and hard of hearing students from many different backgrounds and seeks to develop a workforce that reflects the diversity of its student body. Gallaudet is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action employer and actively encourages deaf, hard of hearing, members of traditionally underrepresented groups, people with disabilities, women, and veterans to apply for open positions.

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Not Quite Tuna

Tonight for dinner I made tuna salad…without tuna…or mayo.

How, you might ask, did I make such meal?

With vegetables and seasoning.

I’m trying to incorporate as many veggies into my diet as I can, so I’m always on the lookout for new recipes. One of the most interesting I’ve seen so far is “Better than Tuna” from this book. First, I whipped out my food processor. Then I discovered my food processor was broken, so I whipped out a knife and cutting board. I finely chopped three big carrots, two celery stalks, a quarter of an onion, half a red pepper, and a tomato. I drained the tomato and threw all the veggies in a bowl.

For the seasoning I mixed in one-half teaspoon Celtic sea salt, one Tablespoon parsley, one-half teaspoon kelp, and three Tablespoons of Vegenaise.

Looking at the concoction, I wasn’t sure what to think. It looked pretty appetizing, but there was only one way to find out for sure. I served the “tuna” in a toasted whole wheat hamburger bun. I also set out a platter of blue corn tortillas with hummus (I cut the tortillas into “chips” and baked them in the oven first). To drink? Fresh vegetable juice.

Numma, numma, numma. It was delicious. I highly recommend it (hopefully your food processor is working though because all that chopping was labor intensive). I’m so excited for lunch tomorrow to eat the leftovers.Š

Use Fluconazole Treatment for Fungal Infections

There are different types of infections and each type requires a particular form of treatment.  For fungal infections, you need to use antifungal drugs for its treatment.  If you develop such an infection, fluconazole treatment is necessary, as fluconazole is an effective antifungal drug that can help greatly in the treatment of fungal infection.  Fluconazole treatment works great against these forms of infection as the treatment property of the drug helps in purging the infection effectively out of the body.  Through the use of fluconazole treatment for fungal infections, you will be able to effectively and efficiently get rid of the infection from your system. Read more…

Wasa with Baked Brie, Brown Sugar and Walnuts

Ingredients

1 wheel (8 ounces) brie cheese
1 tablespoon brown sugar
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
1 package WASA Sourdough Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA variety)

Directions

Preheat oven to 350º
Place brie on sheet pan lined with parchment paper. Top with brown sugar and walnuts.
Bake for 25-30 minutes or until brie is warm and melted inside.
Remove from oven, place on serving tray surrounded with crispbread and serve immediately.

TIP: Store leftover cheese in refrigerator for up to 4-5 days.

Prep time: 35 minutes

Serves 8

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 79
Total Fat 5 g
Saturated Fat 2 g
Cholesterol 12 mg
Sodium 125 mg
Total Carbohydrate 6 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 4 g
Calcium 4% of daily value

Freedom

I was “birthed” into the world of yoga through the Iyengar style where precision and alignment are emphasized. My teacher would adjust our poses starting from our pinky toe (literally – she’d have us lift it up and try to spread it away from our other toes) all the way to the tops of our heads (which, she would tell us, should be lifting toward the ceiling, as if a string was attached to our scalp and someone was pulling).

I’m one of those follow the rules, read the directions, life is in the details type of girls, so I ate Iyengar yoga up. The fact that my hamstrings are tight, my shoulders are scrunched, and my hips are narrow make Iyengar a fitting practice because I benefit so greatly from the blocks and straps and blankets that are generously encouraged in that style of practice to help with proper positioning.

From time to time I’ve experimented with other yoga styles – this article describes various kinds – and recently I found myself in a session where the teacher was leading a flow with pretty much no regard to form whatsoever.

At first I was distraught.

“Beautiful!” the yoga teacher said when I moved into Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II).

“Oh, yeah, right,” I thought to myself.

In an Iyengar class, the instructor is always adjusting my Warrior II pose. I’m like a toy where you push one section in and another section pops out. If she moves my left thigh, my right knee tweaks to a different place. If she tilts my pelvis, my arms plummet. If she tells me where to fix my gaze – whoops – there goes my thigh again.

Anyway, I realized pretty quickly that I didn’t want to spend the entire practice mentally upset that this yoga teacher wasn’t going to focus on form. Other than calling out the pose, she was giving no instructions, and deep inside I knew that was okay. Because yoga really isn’t about form. Not at its core. It’s about being in a present state of mind. Finding a place where I’m not worrying about the future or obsessing over the past, even if those thoughts relate to yoga itself. As I continued the flow, I let go of the details and the precision and simply enjoyed the movement.

I felt warm and flexible and free.

Category Specific RSS

Archives

Tags