Job: Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Gallaudet University

Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Department:  Communication Studies/Technology Access Program

Responsibilities:

This is a tenure track position for a faculty member whose primary area of responsibility is research (at the investigator or principal investigator level), acquisition and management of research grants, and supervision of staff and students toward effective completion of research and related outcomes.  The focus of the research is accessibility and usability of communication technologies by deaf and hard of hearing people. The teaching load of this position, while it may vary depending on the research load, is one course per year.  Responsibilities include assuming project responsibilities and management in the conduct of a grant already underway in this department (Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Telecommunications Access, 2009-2014).  This RERC project is a subgrant from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Trace R&D Center, and is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.  For an overview of the center grant, see:  http://trace.wisc.edu/news/archives/000263.php

Rank and salary at time of appointment will be commensurate with qualifications and experience, at assistant professor or above.  Credit for time in rank and progress toward tenure may be awarded at the time of hire, depending on qualifications.  Due to the heavy emphasis on sponsored research in a center-grant environment, this is an 11-month appointment.

Background:

The Technology Access Program (TAP) has been a thriving endeavor of Gallaudet University since 1985.  The program has had ongoing sponsored program (grant) support throughout its existence, as well as support from Gallaudet University through the faculty appointment of its director.  The program currently consists of the faculty director and 2.75 experienced research staff, whose time is divided among three grants (the RERC on Telecommunications Access, the RERC on Hearing Enhancement, a project of Gallaudet’s Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences; and the Visual Languages and Learning Science of Learning Center), as well as teaching of undergraduate courses.  On average, two students per year, usually one graduate and one undergraduate student, work in the TAP as well.  Members of TAP have received numerous awards for their contribution to accessibility of communications.  The program is highly collaborative, interdisciplinary, efficient, and outcome-oriented.  TAP is part of the undergraduate Department of Communication Studies and the director is a faculty member in that department.  http://tap.gallaudet.edu.

Qualifications:

  1. Ph.D. with research orientation.  Because this is an interdisciplinary center, we are open to considering candidates with a range of educational backgrounds (e.g., engineering, psychology/human factors, management-related advanced degrees, public policy), if the candidate has proven track record of active research and publication prior to application and meets the other qualifications.
  1. Communication competence in ASL that is sufficient for conversation is necessary to begin work in this position, and a commitment to rapid improvement in signing skills is essential if the candidate is not fully fluent at time of hire.  Note that to acquire tenure at Gallaudet, faculty must pass a proficiency exam in American Sign Language.
  1. Evidence of strong interest in the accessibility of society to people who are deaf and hard of hearing, and strong knowledge in this area.
  1. Evidence of participation in acquisition of sponsorship for university research.

Other characteristics desirable in a candidate:

  1. Evidence of success in acquisition of grants through independent securing of grant(s) or contribution to writing of grants.
  1. Evidence of competency in teaching at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  1. Evidence of supervisory and/or mentoring ability.
  1. Evidence of management competency.
  1. Evidence of collaborative work, e.g., with consumers, industry, university personnel, and government personnel.

Application deadline: We will begin reviewing applications immediately and will continue to receive and review applications until the position is filled.

Starting date:  August 15, 2010.

To apply: Send a letter of application, curriculum vita, graduate transcript, and contact information for three references.  The letter of application must make reference to the applicant’s experience with American Sign Language to date.  The application will be screened and interviews may be conducted prior to receipt of the transcript, but the transcript is required before a final decision will be made.  Send these to:

Dr. Judy Harkins, Director

Technology Access Program

Gallaudet University

800 Florida Avenue, NE

SLCC 1116

Washington, DC 20002

Gallaudet University serves deaf and hard of hearing students from many different backgrounds and seeks to develop a workforce that reflects the diversity of its student body. Gallaudet is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action employer and actively encourages deaf, hard of hearing, members of traditionally underrepresented groups, people with disabilities, women, and veterans to apply for open positions.

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Man in the Mud

Panic.

It’s a “sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behavior” according dictionary.com.

I’ve certainly been guilty of it. But it usually doesn’t serve me well. Like the time I convinced myself I had appendicitis and went into such hysterics that I passed out.

I came across this story last week – a construction worker in China was buried alive in the mud with nothing but a gap of air in front of his face (his helmet slid down). He didn’t panic. He practiced meditation and survived two hours on an amount of air that should have lasted five minutes.

I wonder sometimes how I would react in certain situations. What if I was eating in Windows restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11? What if I was in one of the hijacked planes? I don’t think a person truly knows how he or she will respond unless in the situation. God willing, that will never be the case, but if it is, I hope I am like the man in the mud.

WASA Turkey Jack Sandwich

Ingredients

1 slice Wasa Multi Grain Crispbread
1 slice of turkey breast
1 slice pepper jack cheese
1 fresh basil leaf

Directions

Layer each ingredient on the Wasa to create an open-faced sandwich. Break/cut into thirds.

Enjoy!

Brown Rice Risotto

The other night I made brown rice risotto.

Well, kinda.

I ripped the recipe out of O magazine awhile ago and have been hanging onto it. The chef/writer, Colin Cowie, promised he was sharing a “labor-free” variation of the dish that usually requires a lot of stirring. Labor-free – now that’s my kind of meal.

Here’s what I did: I cooked 1 cup of brown rice in an organic free-range chicken broth. Meanwhile, I cooked mushrooms in a skillet for a few minutes (the recipe calls for an assortment of cremini, white jumbo, and shiitake, but we only had one type) and then I set the mushrooms aside. When the rice was ready, I mixed in the mushrooms. Then I mixed in 1 cup of grated parmesan cheese. I served it with a crisp greens salad. It was delicious. You can use other vegetables (asparagus) or ingredients (seafood) in place of mushrooms.

It’s one of those meals that will go into the “let’s make this again” category in my recipe box. Š

Downhill

I carefully set out my outfit.

Organized my purse.

Planned breakfast.

Gathered the leash to walk the dog.

And then, finally, set my alarm clock.

As a writer, I’ve been working out of the home for a couple years, but Monday morning I was due in a company’s corporate offices for a six-week, on-site editorial gig. I’m not a morning person at all, so the night before, I needed to prepare.

Food-wise, the first day went okay. I ate fruit and oatmeal for breakfast, had a tuna sandwich in the office’s cafeteria for lunch, and, back home, had enough energy left over to cook a healthy vegetable-based dinner. That was Day 1. The rest of week I watched myself slide downhill. (I’d forgotten how corporate jobs suck every second of your time away – making it hard to prepare fresh meals. Oh, and the sugar. Being Valentine’s week, the chocolate overload running through that office – Oy! I ate too much of it.) By Friday, my fridge was bare (no breakfast fruit), I was still eating tuna for lunch (hello – mercury overload?), and dinner was refined pasta at a restaurant.

My throat felt a little . . . sore. OMG, was I getting a cold? Dang it. I didn’t have a single cold in 2007, and I suspect it was because my immune system was stronger due to better eating habits.

“I haven’t eaten one vegetable today,” I said to Ron Friday night. (I’m not counting a wilted piece of lettuce and green tomato slice on my tuna sandwich as real vegetables).

Saturday morning, as my sinuses clogged and my throat felt worse, I rushed my husband out the door with a grocery list. I juiced vegetables and drank the concoction down in a few gulps. I ate an orange. For lunch, I made a homemade bean soup. I ate another orange. For dinner I made a veggie omelet.

Too late. I officially had a cold. I knew the best thing I could do for myself was rest. I cancelled all weekend plans, and I slept and drank hot tea. In bed Sunday night, I figured I’d be calling in sick the next day. But miraculously, I woke up cured. Again, I blame the vegetables for the quick recovery.

This week I’m doing better (not great, but better) managing the “office” life. Our home fridge is stocked with healthy foods to choose from in the morning, I’m packing my lunch (dark leafy green salad with cranberries, walnuts, and a little goat cheese), and dinner is mapped out (today we’re having a brown rice risotto with asparagus and a mixed greens salad).

I’ll be sure to toast to good health.

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