Job: Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Gallaudet University

Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Department:  Communication Studies/Technology Access Program

Responsibilities:

This is a tenure track position for a faculty member whose primary area of responsibility is research (at the investigator or principal investigator level), acquisition and management of research grants, and supervision of staff and students toward effective completion of research and related outcomes.  The focus of the research is accessibility and usability of communication technologies by deaf and hard of hearing people. The teaching load of this position, while it may vary depending on the research load, is one course per year.  Responsibilities include assuming project responsibilities and management in the conduct of a grant already underway in this department (Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Telecommunications Access, 2009-2014).  This RERC project is a subgrant from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Trace R&D Center, and is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.  For an overview of the center grant, see:  http://trace.wisc.edu/news/archives/000263.php

Rank and salary at time of appointment will be commensurate with qualifications and experience, at assistant professor or above.  Credit for time in rank and progress toward tenure may be awarded at the time of hire, depending on qualifications.  Due to the heavy emphasis on sponsored research in a center-grant environment, this is an 11-month appointment.

Background:

The Technology Access Program (TAP) has been a thriving endeavor of Gallaudet University since 1985.  The program has had ongoing sponsored program (grant) support throughout its existence, as well as support from Gallaudet University through the faculty appointment of its director.  The program currently consists of the faculty director and 2.75 experienced research staff, whose time is divided among three grants (the RERC on Telecommunications Access, the RERC on Hearing Enhancement, a project of Gallaudet’s Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences; and the Visual Languages and Learning Science of Learning Center), as well as teaching of undergraduate courses.  On average, two students per year, usually one graduate and one undergraduate student, work in the TAP as well.  Members of TAP have received numerous awards for their contribution to accessibility of communications.  The program is highly collaborative, interdisciplinary, efficient, and outcome-oriented.  TAP is part of the undergraduate Department of Communication Studies and the director is a faculty member in that department.  http://tap.gallaudet.edu.

Qualifications:

  1. Ph.D. with research orientation.  Because this is an interdisciplinary center, we are open to considering candidates with a range of educational backgrounds (e.g., engineering, psychology/human factors, management-related advanced degrees, public policy), if the candidate has proven track record of active research and publication prior to application and meets the other qualifications.
  1. Communication competence in ASL that is sufficient for conversation is necessary to begin work in this position, and a commitment to rapid improvement in signing skills is essential if the candidate is not fully fluent at time of hire.  Note that to acquire tenure at Gallaudet, faculty must pass a proficiency exam in American Sign Language.
  1. Evidence of strong interest in the accessibility of society to people who are deaf and hard of hearing, and strong knowledge in this area.
  1. Evidence of participation in acquisition of sponsorship for university research.

Other characteristics desirable in a candidate:

  1. Evidence of success in acquisition of grants through independent securing of grant(s) or contribution to writing of grants.
  1. Evidence of competency in teaching at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  1. Evidence of supervisory and/or mentoring ability.
  1. Evidence of management competency.
  1. Evidence of collaborative work, e.g., with consumers, industry, university personnel, and government personnel.

Application deadline: We will begin reviewing applications immediately and will continue to receive and review applications until the position is filled.

Starting date:  August 15, 2010.

To apply: Send a letter of application, curriculum vita, graduate transcript, and contact information for three references.  The letter of application must make reference to the applicant’s experience with American Sign Language to date.  The application will be screened and interviews may be conducted prior to receipt of the transcript, but the transcript is required before a final decision will be made.  Send these to:

Dr. Judy Harkins, Director

Technology Access Program

Gallaudet University

800 Florida Avenue, NE

SLCC 1116

Washington, DC 20002

Gallaudet University serves deaf and hard of hearing students from many different backgrounds and seeks to develop a workforce that reflects the diversity of its student body. Gallaudet is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action employer and actively encourages deaf, hard of hearing, members of traditionally underrepresented groups, people with disabilities, women, and veterans to apply for open positions.

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Avanafil Approval Rocks the ED Market

A lot of ED pills have been taking over the ED market these days, and despite being classified as the same PDE5 inhibitor drugs, each pill do have some distinct capabilities and effects. Take avanafil, the latest drug ever released today. Despite being new, it has become a tough competitor among pioneering drugs because of its wonderful benefits and effects that has been testified by users. Since it is still new, not all countries were given avanafil approval to sell the drug. So aside from possibly the higher cost, avanafil may be harder to find in some countries. Good thing there are online pharmacies that can help you solve your dilemma with the less hassle.

 

Once avanafil approval has been given, this ED drug by Vivus Inc. has been released in the business. Notwithstanding the way that avanafil approval has been given by the FDA, it didn’t click and likewise it ought to the same number of ED prescription customers and what’s more specialists were genuinely pessimist about the new solution, how fruitful it is, that it is so protected to use, how without question was it to pass on its surety, and if there really was a necessity for another ED treatment drug in the business. Read more…

Garlic Wasa

Ingredients

5 cloves garlic, crushed
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese
8 pieces WASA Multigrain Crispbread (may substitute any WASA Crispbread flavors)

Directions

Preheat oven to 350º
Add all ingredients to a small bowl and mix.
Spread 1 heaping teaspoon onto each crispbread.
Bake 5 to 7 minutes and serve warm.

Prep time: 17 minutes

Serves 8

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 186
Total Fat 11 g
Saturated Fat 1.8 g
Cholesterol 2 mg
Sodium 199 mg
Total Carbohydrate 21 g
Dietary Fiber 4 g
Protein 3 g
Calcium 35 mg

Special Occasions

The street is cleared of traffic, the tents are up, and the vendors are selling summer squash, cherries, and herbs. It’s the second week this season the farmers’ market has been open in town, and my husband escapes from the office so we can enjoy lunch together and wander by the open-air booths. We buy bread (baked from scratch) from one of our favorite vendors and discuss what we can grill, cook, and drink over the next few days.

As we walk, I start thinking about how I’ll be spending a lot more time at farmers’ markets this summer than I have in the past – it’s easier to find local, sustainably-grown food here than at the grocery stores. I’ve always enjoyed farmers’ markets, but I’ve tended to reserve them for “special occasions.” When I lived in Los Angeles my friends and I would load up with market goodies before going to a concert at the Hollywood Bowl, or for a picnic at the beach, or if we had guests coming to town.

With over 3500 farmers’ markets in the United States (visit LocalHarvest.org to find one near you) there are plenty here on the east coast where I currently live. I’ll be visiting more of them over the next few days to get a feel for the ones I prefer, talk to vendors, and gather local meat, eggs, and more fruit and veggies. I know I have my work cut out for me this summer as I learn how to prepare meals, can tomatoes, and make my own salad dressing. But taking the first step and creating the intent to eat clean is one of the biggest hurdles. Besides, it feels good to realize that what used to be a “special occasion” will now be a part of daily life.

Yoga Facial

I slouch too much.

At times – pecking away on my laptop, eating a meal, relaxing on the couch – I’ll catch myself and try to fix it.

Lately, I’ve noticed another habit I’ve developed over the years: frowning. Well, maybe not frowning exactly, but holding a tense face.

Opening the yoga practice, I am sitting with my legs crossed mid-shin. The teacher tells the class to close our eyes and place the back of our hands on our knees with our palms facing the ceiling. Then she tells us to relax our face.

“Relax your jaw,” she says.

“Relax the muscles around your eyes,” she continues.

“Relax the space between your brows . . . your eyelids . . . and even the skin underneath the eyelids.”

She tells the class that relaxing the face is one way to help quiet the brain.

As we continue the practice – sun salutations, standing poses, and core exercises – she gently reminds us about the muscles in our face. And every time it feels amazingly nice to relax them.Š

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