Job: Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Gallaudet University

Tenure Track Faculty Position/Technology Access Program Director

Department:  Communication Studies/Technology Access Program

Responsibilities:

This is a tenure track position for a faculty member whose primary area of responsibility is research (at the investigator or principal investigator level), acquisition and management of research grants, and supervision of staff and students toward effective completion of research and related outcomes.  The focus of the research is accessibility and usability of communication technologies by deaf and hard of hearing people. The teaching load of this position, while it may vary depending on the research load, is one course per year.  Responsibilities include assuming project responsibilities and management in the conduct of a grant already underway in this department (Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Telecommunications Access, 2009-2014).  This RERC project is a subgrant from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Trace R&D Center, and is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.  For an overview of the center grant, see:  http://trace.wisc.edu/news/archives/000263.php

Rank and salary at time of appointment will be commensurate with qualifications and experience, at assistant professor or above.  Credit for time in rank and progress toward tenure may be awarded at the time of hire, depending on qualifications.  Due to the heavy emphasis on sponsored research in a center-grant environment, this is an 11-month appointment.

Background:

The Technology Access Program (TAP) has been a thriving endeavor of Gallaudet University since 1985.  The program has had ongoing sponsored program (grant) support throughout its existence, as well as support from Gallaudet University through the faculty appointment of its director.  The program currently consists of the faculty director and 2.75 experienced research staff, whose time is divided among three grants (the RERC on Telecommunications Access, the RERC on Hearing Enhancement, a project of Gallaudet’s Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences; and the Visual Languages and Learning Science of Learning Center), as well as teaching of undergraduate courses.  On average, two students per year, usually one graduate and one undergraduate student, work in the TAP as well.  Members of TAP have received numerous awards for their contribution to accessibility of communications.  The program is highly collaborative, interdisciplinary, efficient, and outcome-oriented.  TAP is part of the undergraduate Department of Communication Studies and the director is a faculty member in that department.  http://tap.gallaudet.edu.

Qualifications:

  1. Ph.D. with research orientation.  Because this is an interdisciplinary center, we are open to considering candidates with a range of educational backgrounds (e.g., engineering, psychology/human factors, management-related advanced degrees, public policy), if the candidate has proven track record of active research and publication prior to application and meets the other qualifications.
  1. Communication competence in ASL that is sufficient for conversation is necessary to begin work in this position, and a commitment to rapid improvement in signing skills is essential if the candidate is not fully fluent at time of hire.  Note that to acquire tenure at Gallaudet, faculty must pass a proficiency exam in American Sign Language.
  1. Evidence of strong interest in the accessibility of society to people who are deaf and hard of hearing, and strong knowledge in this area.
  1. Evidence of participation in acquisition of sponsorship for university research.

Other characteristics desirable in a candidate:

  1. Evidence of success in acquisition of grants through independent securing of grant(s) or contribution to writing of grants.
  1. Evidence of competency in teaching at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  1. Evidence of supervisory and/or mentoring ability.
  1. Evidence of management competency.
  1. Evidence of collaborative work, e.g., with consumers, industry, university personnel, and government personnel.

Application deadline: We will begin reviewing applications immediately and will continue to receive and review applications until the position is filled.

Starting date:  August 15, 2010.

To apply: Send a letter of application, curriculum vita, graduate transcript, and contact information for three references.  The letter of application must make reference to the applicant’s experience with American Sign Language to date.  The application will be screened and interviews may be conducted prior to receipt of the transcript, but the transcript is required before a final decision will be made.  Send these to:

Dr. Judy Harkins, Director

Technology Access Program

Gallaudet University

800 Florida Avenue, NE

SLCC 1116

Washington, DC 20002

Gallaudet University serves deaf and hard of hearing students from many different backgrounds and seeks to develop a workforce that reflects the diversity of its student body. Gallaudet is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action employer and actively encourages deaf, hard of hearing, members of traditionally underrepresented groups, people with disabilities, women, and veterans to apply for open positions.

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Like the Lotus

During closing, my hands are at my heart in prayer. The yoga teacher says to move my fingers so that only my thumbs and pinky are touching – the center is to remain open, like a flower. She says the lotus grows in the mud and opens up when the sun shines on it, and closes when it doesn’t. She says, “Remember that when life is murkey, and I’m struggling through the mud, to open up, like the lotus.”

Finding Flexibility in Inflexibility

Week 2 of my six-week stint at a newspaper is coming to a close. Four more weeks to go. It’s a blessing, as a freelancer, to have the opportunity to be a part of these projects (steady work! money! live interaction with creatures other than my dog!). But man, the corporate life wipes me out.

I get home from work about 7:30 p.m., make dinner, eat, and plop into bed by 9:00 p.m., exhausted, where I drag my laptop on my lap and spend another couple of hours swaying between vegging out and trying to keep up with my other assignments. The evening yoga class I’d planned to attend? Skipped again.

The other night during one of my zombie-like states, I was flipping through Yoga Journal magazine. The question of the month just so happened to be from a reader who wants to dedicate more time to a yoga practice but finds that work leaves little time or energy to do so.

The yogi who answered the reader question suggested three options (1) back off of a less fulfilling activity and replace it with yoga; (2) spend less time working and more time practicing (which probably means adjusting your standard of living since you’ll presumably make less money if you cut back on work); or (3) make yoga a priority in your free time.

For now I’m choosing option three — switching to a weekend yoga class instead of trying to cram a class in after work when I’m tired and hungry.

Do you have an inflexible schedule that makes practicing yoga more challenging? How do you adjust?

Confused about Coffee

The first time I tried to stop drinking coffee I was working as a lawyer. It was a busy time at the firm, so I honestly don’t know what possessed me to quit cold turkey. I began having headaches on top of the long hours. Six months went by. The headaches stopped (the long hours didn’t). Eventually, I caved. I wanted that energy jolt again. Plus, the taste. Mmmm…the taste.

The second time I tried to stop drinking coffee I was trying to get pregnant. This time I weaned myself slowly. I ordered a small instead of a medium. Then a half regular, half decaf. Finally I made the switch to non-caffeine tea.

After I lost the baby (miscarriage), I was drinking coffee within days.

When I made a commitment to Clean Eating, I thought, Third time’s a charm. But now that I’m well on my way down the path of eating wholesome foods, I’ll say this: drastically reducing my intake of sugar and white flour while drastically increasing my fruit and veggies has been pretty smooth sailing. But the coffee…oh, how I miss it when I don’t drink it.

I just can’t seem to kick it (well, it’s more like I’m unwilling to give it an honest try). I keep reading articles about the benefits of coffee (antioxidants, etc), but really, part of me think that’s like those articles that claim dark chocolate is good for you for the same reasons (antioxidants).

Really, shouldn’t we just eat blueberries?

To make a long story longer, I’m still on the fence about coffee (thus have not given it up). I enjoy the aroma and flavor so much. Plus, unlike sugar which makes me feel bleh inside, coffee makes me feel good (but I know, I know…it increases my blood pressure and doesn’t help with my anxiety issues). So I sit in confusion. I tell myself that out of all the vices in the world caffeine isn’t so bad. (Can you tell I’m piling on the excuses here or what?)

I’d love to hear from others who are dedicated to eating clean, healthy foods. What’s your take on your morning cuppa joe (or lack thereof)? Š

Can I Buy Diflucan Over The Counter?

Over the counter medicines are drugs that can be sold directly to patients having a valid prescription from a doctor or any healthcare professionals. The reason why some drugs are not allowed to be sold directly to consumers over the counter is to make sure that these drugs will only be given to the right patients with the right illness. Some people may think that they already know everything about drugs, or some might think that  some drugs intended for a specific illness that have been prescribed to someone they know, would still be applicable to them; but that kind of thinking should never be pursued.

All drugs have different formulation and ingredients. Some may contain harmful or poisonous ingredients, some might cause drug addiction that could be used for wrong doings, and some drugs might contain an ingredient that can make a person allergic. These are the reasons why not all drugs are sold directly over the counter. Over the counter drugs are regulated by selected regulatory agencies which checks the drug whether it is safe to be taken by common consumers.

Fungal infections are common illness acquired by people and are mainly caused by bacterial infections. To treat these fungal diseases, antifungal agents should be taken just like Fluconazole or Diflucan. The thing about this medicine (Diflucan) is that it is a broad spectrum antifungal agent; it means that it kills a wide range of bacteria. Diflucan are available in tablets and IV (Intravenous injection). Diflucan is used to treat candidal infections caused by the Candida bacteria, urinary tract infections, peritonitis, and pneumonia. Read more…

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