Monthly Archives: June, 2013

From: Williams, Christopher M. [mailto:] Good afternoon everyone, We are announcing our next round of CERT Basic Training. When: Thursday night July 11th from 6pm-9pm Location: Franklin County Emergency Management and Homeland Security Address: 5300 Strawberry Farms Blvd, Columbus, Ohio 43230 The CERT Basic Training continues for 9 Thursdays and will end Thursday September 5th. […]

Diverse Deaf Club of NJ www.ddcnj.org  click for events    DINGO Night ** Location Change & Time ** North Brunswick Senior Citizens Center 15 Linwood Place North Brunswick NJ http://goo.gl/maps/gVISv for Saturday, July 6 and August 3 only Door open: 6 pm     Dingo game at 7:30 pm Admission: $10 member   $12 non-member We will serve desserts […]

Yosemite National Park Publishes Five General Info Videos in ASL Yosemite has had a full-time sign language interpreter in the park every summer for 34 years, but you can get information in sign language before you come to the park too.  Yosemite Deaf Services just published five videos in ASL.  Each video addresses a commonly […]

SAVE THE DATES!! — T&V’s Summer of Signed Services starts June 29th & July 13th We’re thrilled to announce a pair of sign-language-interpreted Shabbat Services, and hope that you can join us! WHAT: A Service with full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets) WHEN: 10:00 AM — 12:30 PM on Saturday, June 29th WHERE: […]

NJRID BIENNIAL CONFERENCE June 28, 29 and 30, 2013 Held at:  The Sheraton Hotel 6 Industrial Way East Eatontown, New Jersey  07724     * * Registration deadline is THURSDAY, JUNE 20th! * * (There will be no onsite registration!)   Do not miss your opportunity to attend NJRID’s 2013 Biennial Conference and 40th Anniversary […]

Pennington Players Announce Unique Production Based on 2003 Deaf West Staging of Huck Finn Musical Adaptation   The Pennington Players are excited to announce upcoming auditions for the musical BIG RIVER, Roger Miller and William Hauptman’s Tony Award-winning adaptation of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This production will be based on the 2003 […]

Join the Actors and Production Team of Jade Films and Entertainment at a FUNdraising Event!   Come & do impromptu ASL Acting Monologues & win a prize for the best impromptu monologue!   Fundraiser in support of our film about a Deaf family and their daughter awaken from coma after learning she’s deaf.   SATURDAY, […]

“Deaf Health Talks” DHCC is a community partner of the NCDHR, working with RRCD’s R.E.A.P   Health Topic:     Preventive Health Presenter:          Mike McKee, MD, MPH Date:                   Thurs., June 27, 2013 Times:                7:00 – 8:30 pm Location:           Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf 1564 Lyell Avenue, Rochester, NY 14606   Come and […]

Hi everyone, Rochester Deaf Awareness Week (RDAW) 2014, Committee is starting now.  Yup, we have more than a year to plan our events.  Rochester will continue it’s mission to educate the hearing community about our deaf and hard of hearing community. RDAW needs volunteers for the committee to success.  If you are interested, please join […]

CTV News An Ottawa-area woman who is both blind and deaf has launched a formal complaint against Air Canada after a difficult trip to Alberta last week that she says left her frightened and humiliated. Christine ‘Coco’ Roschaert is a 33-year-old motivational … See more…

Freedom

I was “birthed” into the world of yoga through the Iyengar style where precision and alignment are emphasized. My teacher would adjust our poses starting from our pinky toe (literally – she’d have us lift it up and try to spread it away from our other toes) all the way to the tops of our heads (which, she would tell us, should be lifting toward the ceiling, as if a string was attached to our scalp and someone was pulling).

I’m one of those follow the rules, read the directions, life is in the details type of girls, so I ate Iyengar yoga up. The fact that my hamstrings are tight, my shoulders are scrunched, and my hips are narrow make Iyengar a fitting practice because I benefit so greatly from the blocks and straps and blankets that are generously encouraged in that style of practice to help with proper positioning.

From time to time I’ve experimented with other yoga styles – this article describes various kinds – and recently I found myself in a session where the teacher was leading a flow with pretty much no regard to form whatsoever.

At first I was distraught.

“Beautiful!” the yoga teacher said when I moved into Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II).

“Oh, yeah, right,” I thought to myself.

In an Iyengar class, the instructor is always adjusting my Warrior II pose. I’m like a toy where you push one section in and another section pops out. If she moves my left thigh, my right knee tweaks to a different place. If she tilts my pelvis, my arms plummet. If she tells me where to fix my gaze – whoops – there goes my thigh again.

Anyway, I realized pretty quickly that I didn’t want to spend the entire practice mentally upset that this yoga teacher wasn’t going to focus on form. Other than calling out the pose, she was giving no instructions, and deep inside I knew that was okay. Because yoga really isn’t about form. Not at its core. It’s about being in a present state of mind. Finding a place where I’m not worrying about the future or obsessing over the past, even if those thoughts relate to yoga itself. As I continued the flow, I let go of the details and the precision and simply enjoyed the movement.

I felt warm and flexible and free.

That Was Easy

I wanted to pop two pills.

After taking the summer off, I played tennis for nearly two hours yesterday and my legs ached from my hips down to my ankles. Also, I had a headache.

Oh, how I wanted ibuprofen to be the answer! Pop the meds, mask the pain, and let me go to sleep. But I decided to hold off. A few little thoughts floated around in my head: What is my body trying to tell me? Could yoga help?

The headache was probably because I was dehydrated. It was hot on the courts. I drank some water and then set the glass down on a table. Sitting on the floor, I raised my arms over my head, clasped my hands together, and turned my palms towards the ceiling. I lowered onto my back and squeezed one knee into my chest while keeping the other leg straight. Switched sides. I did a few spinal twists to remove the stiffness in my hips. Gentle, easy stretches. And I felt so much better afterwards.

That was easy. And it took less than twenty minutes – the time it would’ve taken the ibuprofen to reach my system.

Wasa with Parmesan Herb Seasoning

Ingredients

½ teaspoon chopped basil
¼ teaspoon chopped marjoram
¼ teaspoon chopped thyme
½ tablespoons olive oil
¼ teaspoon tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 pieces WASA Oat Crispbread (may substitute WASA Multigrain, Sourdough rye or Hearty Rye Crispbread)

Directions

Preheat oven to 350º
Mix herbs and oil in small bowl. Brush mixture onto crispbread.
Mix parmesan cheese with salt and pepper to taste in a separate small bowl. Sprinkle parmesan cheese mixture on crispbread.
Place crispbread on baking sheet line with parchment and bake for 5 to 7 minutes.

Prep time: 10 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 147
Total Fat 7 g
Saturated Fat 1.2 g
Cholesterol 2 mg
Sodium 186 mg
Total Carbohydrate 20 g
Dietary Fiber 4 g
Protein 3 g
Calcium 21 mg

Big on Arms

We are in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II) and the teacher is walking us through the pose nice and slow. She has us begin in Tadasana (Mountain pose) and then tells us to touch our fingertips together in front of our chest. As we jump our legs apart, our arms open up too (so they are parallel to the ground).

Next, the real instruction begins. She focuses on our feet, making sure they are spaced far enough apart and turned in the proper direction. She reminds us that our back heel should be aligned with our front heel.

She pauses as we breathe.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

She moves onto our legs. She makes sure that our right knee is bent so that it’s directly over the right ankle. We need to press our thigh back so we can see our second toe. She keeps us focused on our lower body, giving us directions on our tailbone, butt, and – again – our thighs. She mentions that second toe again.

Inhale, exhale.
Inhale, exhale.

You can practically hear the thoughts of every student in the studio: My arms are tired. My arms are so tired! When will this pose be over so we can put our arms down? Are anyone else’s arms tired? Or am I just a wimp? How much longer do we have to hold our arms up?

Finally, the teacher says, “I know your arms are tired.”

Her acknowledgement is a relief even though she encourages us to keep those arms lifted. “Stretch them out even further, reeeaaaaching for the walls,” she says.

She moves onto our shoulder blades – are they scrunched up by our neck? Release them.

Lengthen our torsos.

Broaden our chests.

She knows exactly what we’re doing – allowing our minds to be consumed with thoughts about our arms.

“Your brain starts to panic first,” she says. “Your body is strong and your arms can handle this.”

That’s the extra motivation we need for the last few breaths until she finally has us step our feet back together and place our hands on our hips.

I’m working out in LA for a couple weeks – my old hometown – and it’s great to be back in my favorite teacher’s class. Now that I’m here, I remember she was always big on arms.

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