Monthly Archives: March, 2013

Irondequoit Post The only other award presented during the ceremony went to Bakar Ali, a third-year RIT and NTID student who has a double major in urban and community … See more…

Gazette.Net: Maryland Community News Online It was the fourth straight victory for the school, which also won a title in 2005. The MSD team had four students: senior Salomon Lundquist, junior Jehanne McCullough, sophomore Tayla Newman and senior Ethan Sonnenstrahl, who also won the most … Click here to see…

Good morning everyone !!! Reminder !!! Please go to rochesterdeaffestival.org to register for admission. Please spread to your family or friends to register on line.

                             WITH SYRACUSE DEAF CLUB   SATURDAY, AUGUST 3RD                                       11:00AM – 5:00PM AND overnight via free camp-out with breakfast… location:  JAMESVILLE SPORTSMEN’S CLUB                                   Route 91                     […]

 

        Rustic Lantern Films “Lake Windfall” in ASL and Closed-Captioned tickets are on SALE now! Surrounding cities/counties like Lancaster, Pataskala, London, Heath, Washington C.H., Newark, Granville, Mount Sterling, Marysville, Delaware, Akron, Mansfield, Marion, Reynoldsburg, Gahanna, Grove City, & etc are welcome to come. We can meet half way to buy tickets in […]

Click here to see RnR_2013_flyer

Ohlone College COUNSELOR FOR DEAF/HARD OF HEARING Full-Time Tenure-Track Counseling Faculty Position – Start Fall 2013 APPLICATION DEADLINE: April 19, 2013 at 5:00 PM Starting Salary Range: $61,274 to $93,225 IDEAL CANDIDATE Ohlone College seeks to employ counseling faculty who have a passion for counseling and a strong commitment to the missions and ideals of […]

New Jersey Association of the Deaf, Inc is proudly presents ASL Fun Activity: Kite Flying      in English and Spanish flyer! Free Admission Kite materials will be provided. Saturday, April 27, 2013    1 pm to 5 pm at Seven Presidents Oceanfront Park 221 Ocean Avenue North Long Branch NJ 07740 Deaf and disabled children are […]

A Time to Feast

I’m hanging out with my parents when my dad sees me frantically rubbing my thumbs against the palms of my hands.

“Are you nervous?” he asks.

“Yeah,” I say.

He wants to know why. How to explain?

My parents have been visiting the past few days. I haven’t seen them in over six months. It’s the longest period of time we’ve ever been apart (even when I lived in Europe after college I saw them at least every four months). The past few days have been one big party. We’ve eaten red meat and fried foods. We’ve had Grasshoppers (ice cream and alcohol) and cookies. I think I munched on a vegetable in there somewhere – yes, I steamed spinach one night – but other than that, I can’t say I’ve been practicing “mindful eating” since Saturday. And my home yoga regime? Completely cut off once my parents arrived (although my mom saw my mat, which was rolled out on the floor, and she practiced sun salutations).

“I’m not sure what to blog about for Wasa this week,” I finally say to my dad.

“Well, let’s think,” he says.

“I’m supposed to blog about yoga and mindful eating, but I’m not inspired given my eating habits and lack of yoga practice,” I explain.

My dad is silent for awhile. “You could talk about how yoga is important for old people like me,” he finally says. “As people age, they are at an increased risk of falling. So write in your blog that yoga is important for balance and to do yoga with a Wasa cracker.”

“Uh, okay. Thanks,” I say.

“Just trying to help,” he says.

My mom chimes in too. “Oh, I know,” she says. “Blog about the fact that we bought a juicer.”

It’s true. My parents read the Wasa blog and were inspired to buy a juicer.

“Last week we made peach juice with vodka,” my mom says. “It was delicious!” She pauses. “Am I missing the point?”

Well, I do wish they would make vegetable juice instead, but maybe I’m the one who is missing the point. As I drop them off at the airport, I know what I’m going to blog about: A Time to Feast. This week we’ve hit up good restaurants and had fun cooking in too. We played cards and watched baseball and talked, all over scones for breakfast and steaks for dinner. It was a reunion. A celebration.  A time to enjoy life. Not that we couldn’t have done that over Brussels sprouts and brown rice, but eating well most of the time makes it easier to allow the exceptions. Not to mention, those “exceptions” are much appreciated.

Downhill

I carefully set out my outfit.

Organized my purse.

Planned breakfast.

Gathered the leash to walk the dog.

And then, finally, set my alarm clock.

As a writer, I’ve been working out of the home for a couple years, but Monday morning I was due in a company’s corporate offices for a six-week, on-site editorial gig. I’m not a morning person at all, so the night before, I needed to prepare.

Food-wise, the first day went okay. I ate fruit and oatmeal for breakfast, had a tuna sandwich in the office’s cafeteria for lunch, and, back home, had enough energy left over to cook a healthy vegetable-based dinner. That was Day 1. The rest of week I watched myself slide downhill. (I’d forgotten how corporate jobs suck every second of your time away – making it hard to prepare fresh meals. Oh, and the sugar. Being Valentine’s week, the chocolate overload running through that office – Oy! I ate too much of it.) By Friday, my fridge was bare (no breakfast fruit), I was still eating tuna for lunch (hello – mercury overload?), and dinner was refined pasta at a restaurant.

My throat felt a little . . . sore. OMG, was I getting a cold? Dang it. I didn’t have a single cold in 2007, and I suspect it was because my immune system was stronger due to better eating habits.

“I haven’t eaten one vegetable today,” I said to Ron Friday night. (I’m not counting a wilted piece of lettuce and green tomato slice on my tuna sandwich as real vegetables).

Saturday morning, as my sinuses clogged and my throat felt worse, I rushed my husband out the door with a grocery list. I juiced vegetables and drank the concoction down in a few gulps. I ate an orange. For lunch, I made a homemade bean soup. I ate another orange. For dinner I made a veggie omelet.

Too late. I officially had a cold. I knew the best thing I could do for myself was rest. I cancelled all weekend plans, and I slept and drank hot tea. In bed Sunday night, I figured I’d be calling in sick the next day. But miraculously, I woke up cured. Again, I blame the vegetables for the quick recovery.

This week I’m doing better (not great, but better) managing the “office” life. Our home fridge is stocked with healthy foods to choose from in the morning, I’m packing my lunch (dark leafy green salad with cranberries, walnuts, and a little goat cheese), and dinner is mapped out (today we’re having a brown rice risotto with asparagus and a mixed greens salad).

I’ll be sure to toast to good health.

Wasa with Scrambled Eggs, Tricolor Peppers and Leeks

Ingredients

½ cup red peppers cut into ½ in long strips
½ cup green peppers cut into ½ in long strips
½ cup yellow peppers, cut into ½ in long strips
¼ cup (2 ounces) pasteurized egg white product (may substitute 1 whole egg, beaten)
1 teaspoon olive oil
2 tablespoons leeks, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon fresh parsley, chopped
2 pieces WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread

Directions

Heat olive oil in a small skillet. Add vegetables and cook until desired tenderness.
Add egg to vegetables and cook through. Remove from heat and stir in parsley.
Spread on WASA Crispbread and serve.

TIP: Substitute ½ cup of any of you favorite vegetables for peppers.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

 

Calories 85
Total Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 2 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 125 mg
Total Carbohydrate 12 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 5 g
Calcium 2% of daily value

NOTE: Nutrition information shown is not applicable when whole egg is substituted for egg white product.

Herbs

One of my husbands charms is that if it’s my birthday, or a holiday, or some other gift-giving event, he’ll sneak in a surprise present – a little something extra that wasn’t on my list that he thought of completely on his own. For example, one year he gave me a handheld Ms. Pac-Man game because he knew I used to love Ms. Pac-Man s a kid (one time we came across the video machine in a restaurant, and I went nuts, challenging my husband to round after round until I had blisters).

So this year – after reading and observing me write the Wasa blog, and noticing my developing interest in cooking – he gave me an herb garden. Well, sort of. We don’t have real garden space in our city place, so he gave me a kit that you can assemble right on your countertop.

Mint.
Basil.
Dill.
Cilantro.
Thyme.
Parsley.
Chives.

My mom and I put together this afternoon.

We snapped a light onto the “garden” and popped in the seed pods.

“Can it really be this easy?” I said.

It was.

We added some water, feed it some nutrients, and left it to grow.

It takes about five weeks until the herbs will be ready for harvesting.

First recipe? I’m thinking a garden herb omelet.

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