Monthly Archives: May, 2012

Friday, June 8, 2012 8:00pm til Closing We are moving our June Friday night out to the 2nd Friday of the month before the Deaf Festival Day. This place has a beach in its backyard and Lake Ontario!! I hosted this event back in August of 2011 and it was a HUGE success!!  What better […]

Fulton Sun Yet we govern our own international, national, state and local organizations. They include the World Federation of the Deaf, National Association of the Deaf, Deaf Olympics, States Associations of the Deaf and local Deaf Clubs, including Sport agendas … See More…

Huffington Post In the first place, the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) has existed since 1880, filling a dire need to ensure deaf people were afforded the same equal rights as hearing people. Indeed, the oppression of deaf people is a shameful chapter in … See more…

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE     SENIORS TAKE CENTER STAGE TEXAS SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF’S CLASS OF 2012 – SCHOLARSHIPS and AWARDS CEREMONY Austin, Texas – May 30, 2012  Today at the Texas School for the Deaf (TSD), the Graduating Class of 2012 strolls down the South Austin campus, with teachers and staff members waving final […]

4th Annual Rochester School for the Deaf   River Ramble 5K Run / 2 Mile Walk / 1 Mile Family Fun Walk   Saturday, June 2, 2012   Rain or Shine!   On-site Registration / Check-In Begins: 8:00 a.m.   Run Begins: 9:00 a.m. / Walk Begins 9:05 a.m.   1545 St. Paul Street Rochester, […]

KMGH Denver A Colorado mother and the Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition have filed a lawsuit against Arapahoe County over what they claim is a lack of sign language interpreters. Teresa Fekany is deaf and uses American Sign Language to communicate. To see more..

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New York Daily News IGNOU Vice Chancellor M. Aslam said that at present, there were 90 deaf students in IGNOU and they were considered a linguistic minority rather than a disability group. “The moment we pick up how they talk to each other, they start communicating with … To see more…

RIT News As the academic year comes to an end, several RIT/NTID students received honors and scholarships for their achievements and continued efforts to succeed. To see more…

What: OCC ITP Sign Club – Game Night When: June 23, 2012 Where: Ocean County College – College Drive, Toms River NJ Time: 7pm – 10pm Please come bring your favorite board game, and come socialize at our June Sign Club. We are bringing back summer sign clubs, with lots of events this summer. Please join […]

Do I Knead a Bread Machine?

Bread.

The staple of life.

Now that I’ve gotten used to making my own fresh vegetable juice, I’m thinking of bread. I recall reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle a few months ago and coming across a passage by the author’s husband (Steven Hopp) who makes a fresh loaf practically everyday.

He says, “I know you’ve got one around somewhere: maybe in the closet. Or on the kitchen counter, so dusty nobody remembers it’s there. A bread machine.”

A bread machine? Nope, don’t have one in the closet or on the counter or anywhere. I’m lucky if I can find a spatula in our kitchen. During a party this spring, I was talking with the host’s mother. She’s in her late 80s and makes her own bread. I told her I wanted to learn so I could make homemade pizza dough, whole wheat, pumpernickel, etc.

“But I don’t have a bread machine,” I said.

She practically fell out of her chair laughing. I guess if you really know how to make bread the old fashioned way, you knead the dough. By hand. For a long time.

“You have to feel the dough to make sure it’s right,” she said.

Call me crazy, but kneading dough by hand actually sounds fun. I think I’ll try it (although I have no idea what it’s supposed to “feel” like, so I’ll have to wing that part). In the meantime, I’ll keep my eye out at garage sales for someone else’s barely-used, dusty bread machine.

Basic Equipment

I enjoy the beginning of yoga class because the opening is generally “easy” – well, at least physically (the meditating part can bring up its own set of challenges).

But before we practice some of the more difficult poses, we usually we open by sitting in Sukhasana for a few minutes. And then maybe move onto our hands and knees to practice Dog Tilt and Cat Pose. It’s a place for gentle movements. A time to bring awareness to our breath.

The other day at the beginning of class, we were on our hands and knees with a neutral spine (tabletop). The teacher asked us to lift our right arm off the ground and straighten it so it pointed forward. Both of our arms were engaged. The left one pushing the floor away, and the right one reaching for the wall in front of us (in a way where we weren’t scrunching our shoulder blade up to our neck). She had us hold that position. For a long, long time. It was hard. (Don’t believe me? Try it.)

“Some poses can be deceptive,” the teacher said. “Not as easy as they seem.”

I love that about yoga. I love that I don’t need an expensive gym membership or fancy equipment or special shoes to build flexibility and strength. I just need my body, my mind, and my spirit.Š

Mediterranean Tuna Sandwich on Wasa

Ingredients

1 can (6 ounces) albacore tuna in water
1 tablespoon kalamata olives, chopped fine
2 teaspoons sun dried tomatoes, chopped
1 teaspoon parsley, chopped fine
1 tablespoon roasted red pepper, chopped fine
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon fresh basil, chopped fine
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black peppert to taste
8 pieces Wasa Fiber Rye Crispbread

Directions

Drain tuna and place in a small bowl. Mix all ingredients together. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Spoon 1 tablespoon tuna mixture on each crispbread.

TIP: Store leftovers in refrigerator for up to 3-4 days for a quick snack.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Serves 2

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 283
Total Fat 12 g
Saturated Fat 1.2 g
Cholesterol 38 mg
Sodium 373 mg
Total Carbohydrate 31 g
Dietary Fiber 9 g
Protein 24 g
Calcium 12 g

The Plan: Finding the Path to Clean Eating

Once I decided to adopt a Clean Eating lifestyle I realized I needed a Plan. ASAP.

I broke my Plan into three parts.

Part One

I read a number of books and browsed websites (including Mercola.com, DrWeil.com, Pritikin.com and EatWasaFeelGood.com (the Best Life page has good snacks/recipes)). Then I sat down Saturday morning and outlined a meals for the week as well as guidelines for eating. In a nutshell: I want to wildly increase my intake of vegetables, drastically decrease my consumption of animal products (a maximum of one serving per day), and eliminate sugar, refined flour, caffeine, and alcohol.

Let me add a disclaimer: I’m not a doctor, a nutritionist, or a dietitian. I am simply a 33-year-old woman trying to eat clean foods after discovering that the third ingredient in my “healthy” cereal was sugar and my 100% whole wheat bread contained high fructose corn syrup. Also, I fully intend to tweak my eating habits as I explore what works for my body.

So – back to the Plan. Some changes would be easy. For example, I already found nearby farms to frequent. Eating locally grown grass-fed chicken would hopefully be smooth sailing. Some changes would be hard. I’ve spent the last few weeks weaning myself off of the very large cup of coffee I drink each morning and replacing it with caffeine-free herbal tea. I miss the aroma of those Kona beans! Some changes I’m still on the fence about, like dairy products. I’ve heard all sorts of arguments and ideas (both pro and con) when it comes to milk, cheese, and eggs. This is going to require more investigation. I’m heading to a farm in Virginia next week to learn more about raw milk.

Part Two

The second part of my plan involved making a list of my ailments. I want to track my physical problems over the course of a year and observe improvements. I’ll spare you the entire litany of conditions, but here are a few:

Eyesight: will drinking fresh homemade vegetable juice and eating clean foods restore my eyesight to the point where my prescription is weakened or obsolete?

Skin Problems: in addition to acne (yes, I’m still breaking out at age 33), my skin doctor is constantly chopping off “suspicious” looking moles. She says they’re benign but she also calls them a not-so-pretty word that I can’t pronounce. I’d love to start getting a clean bill of health during my annual dermatology appointments.

Colds: I’ve heard of people who haven’t had a cold in 30 years. Sign me up. No more colds!

Endometriosis/Infertility: This will be the most personal challege. Endometriosis has not only caused severe physical pain, but has resulted in surgery where the doctor had to remove a cyst the size of a cantaloupe as well as most of my ovary. Plus it has caused problems with fertility. I’m thinking…will Clean Eating restore my hormone balances and clear the way for a healthy pregnancy? We’ll see.

Part Three

The final part of my plan seemed crucial: restaurants. I Googled all the restaurants within 30 miles of my home that serve local, organic fare. Then I taped the list to our refrigerator. If I’m ever too exhausted to cook or if I completely demolish a recipe as I experiment in the kitchen, my husband and I can escape to these spots – one of which is a restaurant that serves vegetarian Indian cuisine. Score!

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