Monthly Archives: October, 2011

The Center on Access Technology at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf has been awarded a $1.6 million five-year grant from the National Science Foundation’s Research in Disability Education program to establish a virtual academic community for college students who are deaf or hard of hearing and majoring in the STEM […]

Henrietta Post Sean Forbes (in black) next to Matt Hamill with students at RIT/NTID for a video … “RIT/NTID is a beautiful campus and it was my home for many years. …

Discover Poetry You Can’t Hear: Deaf Jam Premieres on PBS, November 3 Technorati Viewers meet deaf teen Aneta Brodski, an Israeli immigrant high school student who lives in New York and attends the Lexington School for the Deaf, in Deaf Jam, an exploration of the slam poetry scene as translated and transfigured by people who […]

Mazel Tov: JDRC Congratulates President Alexis Kashar, One of JWI’s “2011 Women to Watch” With great pride and humility, the Jewish Deaf Resource Center (JDRC, www.JDRC.org) is honored to announce that its President, Alexis Kashar, has been selected as one of Jewish Women International’s “2011 Women to Watch”. In addition to her work as JDRC […]

Deaf & Hard of Hearing Specialist Moorhead, MN   Do you want to make a difference in the lives of people who are deaf or hard of hearing?   This is a great opportunity to apply your skills, talents, and expertise in sign language, deaf culture, and human services to meet the unique needs of […]

Hi, again, If someone approached you and asked you to be part of an ASL interpreting team at a Jewish Service or other life-cycle event, what would you say? Would you know enough about the subject matter to do justice to such an assignment? Would you know where to turn for resources to assist you […]

Hi Everyone, Sorry in advance, but I have to do some shameless self promotion of my film, “The Hammer” (formerly titled, “Hamill”).  This film has been a labor of love for almost six years and it recently opened in limited theaters this past Thursday (Oct 27th)!  If you have the time, please go to the […]

WLS “Nesbitt advised his passenger was ‘deaf and dumb.’” But when New Lenox police officers arrived as backup, the deputy told the passenger to step out of the vehicle — which he reportedly did. “I (then) asked him to step to the front of the Pontiac and …

Free Life Changing App for your Android™ Powered Device       Phones | Sprint CapTel | WebCapTel | Contact Us Free Life Changing App for your Android™ Powered Device Speak, listen and read your phone conversations wirelessly! Wireless CapTel® by Sprint® is a free app for individuals with hearing loss to place captioned calls […]

Brighton-Pittsford Post By Keith Loria Pittsford residents Lowell Patric and Dr. Thomas Pearson received achievement honors from the Rochester School for the Deaf at a special awards presentation on Oct. 12. Patric won the 2011 Perkins Founders Award for individuals who have …

Mix it Up

Staying at our retreat home in the mountains of Colorado has me thinking about water. I constantly see large vehicles with oversized plastic containers strapped into their truck beds, full of water. Water is hauled all over the place. It’s dry out here.

I’ve actually become a bit paranoid about water. What is the healthiest way to drink it? Should I gulp tap water and risk consuming substances like chlorine and fluoride, not to mention whatever else the water might be picking up as it flows through the pipes? Or should I buy water in a bottle and risk consuming leeched chemicals from the plastic, not to mention hurting the environment (plastic water bottles take 1000 years to biodegrade)? And if I do opt for store bought water, what should I purchase? Spring? Distilled? Glacial?

The more I read about water, the more confusing the facts. I find this to be the case with fish too (Eat it – it’s good for you! Don’t eat it – tuna contains mercury, fish handlers get infections when capturing rockfish, etc.!)

Here’s my current theory: instead of devoting myself to one type of water (tap, spring, well) I mix it up. That way, I figure I’ll get a variety of chemicals but (hopefully) in miniscule amounts. I take the same approach with fish. I’ll eat tuna on occasion, but not too often. Same with salmon and shrimp and sole. So that’s my theory and I’m stickin’ to it.  Š

Top 10 Reasons I Love My Juicer

10. My produce never goes to waste anymore

9. No cooking, baking, stirring, or waiting. Just slice, juice, and drink (well, and clean)

8. Extra veggies, extra veggies, extra veggies – for both me and my spouse

7. My dog likes the scraps (dry pulp) mixed in with her meal

6. I feel clean and healthy and energized

5. The machine also makes baby food, nut butters, and pasta

4. Studies show juicing helps prevents disease

3. Juicing offers a great source of enzymes which are often destroyed by heat in cooked foods

2. It is the only way I’ll incorporate beets into my diet

1. Homemade food is the best. Hands down.

I must admit I was nervous about buying a juicer. They aren’t cheap (around $200 for a good one) and I was afraid I’d find juicing too inconvenient, resulting in a new nice appliance simply gathering dust in the corner of the kitchen. But I can’t emphasize enough how much I love it!

Confused about Coffee

The first time I tried to stop drinking coffee I was working as a lawyer. It was a busy time at the firm, so I honestly don’t know what possessed me to quit cold turkey. I began having headaches on top of the long hours. Six months went by. The headaches stopped (the long hours didn’t). Eventually, I caved. I wanted that energy jolt again. Plus, the taste. Mmmm…the taste.

The second time I tried to stop drinking coffee I was trying to get pregnant. This time I weaned myself slowly. I ordered a small instead of a medium. Then a half regular, half decaf. Finally I made the switch to non-caffeine tea.

After I lost the baby (miscarriage), I was drinking coffee within days.

When I made a commitment to Clean Eating, I thought, Third time’s a charm. But now that I’m well on my way down the path of eating wholesome foods, I’ll say this: drastically reducing my intake of sugar and white flour while drastically increasing my fruit and veggies has been pretty smooth sailing. But the coffee…oh, how I miss it when I don’t drink it.

I just can’t seem to kick it (well, it’s more like I’m unwilling to give it an honest try). I keep reading articles about the benefits of coffee (antioxidants, etc), but really, part of me think that’s like those articles that claim dark chocolate is good for you for the same reasons (antioxidants).

Really, shouldn’t we just eat blueberries?

To make a long story longer, I’m still on the fence about coffee (thus have not given it up). I enjoy the aroma and flavor so much. Plus, unlike sugar which makes me feel bleh inside, coffee makes me feel good (but I know, I know…it increases my blood pressure and doesn’t help with my anxiety issues). So I sit in confusion. I tell myself that out of all the vices in the world caffeine isn’t so bad. (Can you tell I’m piling on the excuses here or what?)

I’d love to hear from others who are dedicated to eating clean, healthy foods. What’s your take on your morning cuppa joe (or lack thereof)? Š

Propecia Generic — Man’s Best Friend When It Comes to Male-Pattern Baldness

A majority of people usually think that men typically do not care much about their appearances.  This kind of thinking is actually very untrue, especially when it comes to the subject of androgenetic alopecia, or otherwise known as male-pattern baldness.  Men who are potentially going to suffer from this kind of condition (due to heredity) or those who are already going through a great deal of embarrassment and other negative emotions regarding baldness typically get to learn about one of its most well-known treatments, and that is, propecia generic.

Why is it called male-pattern baldness?

Male-pattern baldness is called like that simply because the balding process sort of follows a typical set pattern.  The initial stage of classic male-pattern baldness is typically a disappearing hairline, and then it is followed by the thinning and lessening of the hair near the temples and on the top of the head.  By the time these two balding areas meet in the center, it creates an illusion of a u-shaped hair surrounding the sides and the back of the head.  Even if this process of balding is really slow in most men suffering from it, unfortunately, they will turn out to be completely bald in the long run. Read more…

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