Monthly Archives: October, 2011

The Center on Access Technology at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf has been awarded a $1.6 million five-year grant from the National Science Foundation’s Research in Disability Education program to establish a virtual academic community for college students who are deaf or hard of hearing and majoring in the STEM […]

Henrietta Post Sean Forbes (in black) next to Matt Hamill with students at RIT/NTID for a video … “RIT/NTID is a beautiful campus and it was my home for many years. …

Discover Poetry You Can’t Hear: Deaf Jam Premieres on PBS, November 3 Technorati Viewers meet deaf teen Aneta Brodski, an Israeli immigrant high school student who lives in New York and attends the Lexington School for the Deaf, in Deaf Jam, an exploration of the slam poetry scene as translated and transfigured by people who […]

Mazel Tov: JDRC Congratulates President Alexis Kashar, One of JWI’s “2011 Women to Watch” With great pride and humility, the Jewish Deaf Resource Center (JDRC, is honored to announce that its President, Alexis Kashar, has been selected as one of Jewish Women International’s “2011 Women to Watch”. In addition to her work as JDRC […]

Deaf & Hard of Hearing Specialist Moorhead, MN   Do you want to make a difference in the lives of people who are deaf or hard of hearing?   This is a great opportunity to apply your skills, talents, and expertise in sign language, deaf culture, and human services to meet the unique needs of […]

Hi, again, If someone approached you and asked you to be part of an ASL interpreting team at a Jewish Service or other life-cycle event, what would you say? Would you know enough about the subject matter to do justice to such an assignment? Would you know where to turn for resources to assist you […]

Hi Everyone, Sorry in advance, but I have to do some shameless self promotion of my film, “The Hammer” (formerly titled, “Hamill”).  This film has been a labor of love for almost six years and it recently opened in limited theaters this past Thursday (Oct 27th)!  If you have the time, please go to the […]

WLS “Nesbitt advised his passenger was ‘deaf and dumb.’” But when New Lenox police officers arrived as backup, the deputy told the passenger to step out of the vehicle — which he reportedly did. “I (then) asked him to step to the front of the Pontiac and …

Free Life Changing App for your Android™ Powered Device       Phones | Sprint CapTel | WebCapTel | Contact Us Free Life Changing App for your Android™ Powered Device Speak, listen and read your phone conversations wirelessly! Wireless CapTel® by Sprint® is a free app for individuals with hearing loss to place captioned calls […]

Brighton-Pittsford Post By Keith Loria Pittsford residents Lowell Patric and Dr. Thomas Pearson received achievement honors from the Rochester School for the Deaf at a special awards presentation on Oct. 12. Patric won the 2011 Perkins Founders Award for individuals who have …

The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

Vardenafil HCL — Your Effective Medication for Impotency

Impotency is just one of the many challenges a man could experience, and if you happen to acquire this symptom, then you have just landed on the right page. Although there are many drugs available in the market these days for treating erection difficulties, you can find Vardenafil HCL 20mg medication as one of the most prescribed drugs by your doctor.

Vardenafil basically works by pumping more blood supply towards the male organ to help stimulate sexual drive. However, the drug does not guarantee you a lifetime treatment – ED is incurable and the drugs available such as Vardenafil are only instruments to improve sexual performance. Of course, you have to be sexually aroused to appreciate the results of this medication.

How to take Vardenafil

Take this medication by swallowing the tablet immediately – don’t break, split, crush, or chew the tablet. You can also take this drug with your regular meals, or even without food. Vardenafil should work 60 minutes after the medicine has been ingested.
Doctors may recommend you the appropriate dosage as well as the proper interval of time in taking your medications. Follow the prescriptions sincerely and read the labels so you will have information about how the drug should work. Never attempt to go beyond the prescription or taking the drug more often than what is recommended; otherwise, the possible side effects will be magnified and you will likely experience the negative symptoms. Read more…

Welcome, Loved One

A few weeks ago I was in Tulum, Mexico for a week of yoga, meditation and silent beach walks. I arrived at night after everyone else had gone to sleep. Inside my cabana two flickering candles revealed a comfy bed draped in mosquito netting with a welcome card on the pillow. I picked up the card and read what was written. Holding it next to my heart I smiled. Then I crawled under the covers and drifted off to sleep.

The next morning as I was journaling in my notebook, I thought about the card and scribbled down what it had said: You are worth loving. I had a funny feeling that what I wrote wasn’t quite right, so I went back to my cabana to double-check. Sure enough, I had misquoted the card. It actually read: I am worth loving.

Notice the difference?

Why is it so easy to believe others are worth loving, but so hard to believe it about ourselves? Why is it difficult to say? To know? To live?

This isn’t a narcissistic kind of love; rather, it’s a “love your neighbor as yourself” kind of love. Eating mindfully, treating ourselves with kindness, practicing yoga — these are ways we can love ourselves by being stewards of our body and soul.

I began practicing yoga years ago after watching my then-boyfriend (now husband) ease into a backbend with grace. To this day I still can’t do that, but it doesn’t matter because self-love is about accepting myself for who I am, not what I can achieve. I will be blogging about yoga twice a week for the Eat Wasa Feel Good team (my partner, Zandria, introduced herself yesterday as the vegan blogger).

So here’s a warm welcome to you, loved one, and an invitation to join me on this journey. Feel free to post comments, questions or ideas. You can also e-mail me or visit my personal blog, Roughly Speaking.

Oh, by the way, my name is Jenny. And I am worth loving.

Dancing Your Way to a Healthy Body

There are a lot of people who exercise to make themselves fit and healthy.  They go to gyms, do treadmills, jog, bike, swim, and many more.  The problem with these exercises is that they become very monotonous, especially when you do them several times a week.  The truth is there are other exercises where you can do cardio without actually being bored doing it – dancing.  Well, it may sound funny at first but dancing can actually be a strenuous activity which is perfect for those who are looking for a challenging and very exciting form of exercise.  The best part of it all is that you not only learn new moves, but that you do not keep on repeating the same steps over and over wherein the overall exercise is pure and simple repetition of itself.

Do not let dancing fool you because even if you think you are fit from all that jogging and running, try doing some fast and rigorous dance routine and you will be sweating bullets in under an hour.  Or you can try some simple graceful moves that can test the overall flexibility of your joints and ligaments.

If you try to look at people who do dancing for a living, you will notice just how lean their physiques are yet strong and capable enough to lift their dance partners.  In short, dancing can actually help you build a strong and healthy body.  Here are just some of the few benefits of dancing:

Cardio – dancing is all about constant movement and this can help you give your cardio some workout.  Once you become more skilled and develop better stamina for dancing, your endurance also increases which means you can practice doing certain dance moves for hours on end.  In essence, this not only gives you a cardio workout, but it also develops your stamina and endurance.

Strength – aside from cardio, dancing also has some elements which helps make you stronger.  For example, when you do dips and certain weight bearing towards your legs, hips and thighs, you inevitably build your base muscles that help strengthen your balance.  Additionally, the rhythmic movements with different sway patterns help in developing your center of gravity.

Weight Loss – dancing is not as easy as it looks and it can wear down your muscles easily and can make you sweat heavily, especially when you are not used to moving your whole body or nearly all your muscles together.  Through dance movements, you burn a lot of calories which can certainly make anyone lose weight.  This is the very reason why dancers are usually slim.

Flexibility – part of dancing is bending, twisting, and moving your body at angles you do not usually do.  Such movements actually help you in developing your flexibility.  Additionally, doing some stretching prior to dancing is also necessary in order to avoid any injuries caused by sprains or torn ligaments.  Dancing is very tough on muscles, tendons, and ligaments if you do it without practice and stretching.  Additionally, practicing dancing more and more can help you to become more flexible.

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