Monthly Archives: August, 2010

Northern Virginia Sign Language Club Invites you to our 2010 Friday Silent Game Nights

Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences

Northern Virginia Association of the Deaf General Meeting and 2009 R.I.A. Award Ceremony *Thursday, September 9, 7:30 P.M.*

WHAM Reported by: Sean Carroll Email: Last Update: 6:28 am Henrietta, NY – Anthony “Tony” Wallace lived in Rochester for about decade; first as a standout wrestler for R.I.T. and later as a coach and campus safety officer.  Wallace, friends and colleagues say, made a habit out of achieving goals he set for himself.  At the […]

UPI Published: Aug. 30, 2010 at 7:17 PM HOONAH, Alaska, Aug. 30 (UPI) — A suspect was taken into custody Monday after a standoff with police and charged with killing two Alaska police officers, one of whom was deaf, police said. The standoff ended at 9:30 a.m. when John Marvin Jr., 45, walked out of […]

Greetings friends! This is a reminder of upcoming events on Sept 4.  All day FUN! District of Columbia Area Black Deaf Advocates hosts LABOR DAY COOKOUT/CRUISE COOKOUT Saturday, September 4, 2010 KDES Pavilion Area 800 Florida Ave, NE Washington, DC 10:00 am to 6pm Come for great food, games and fun!!! Lunch 12:00 noon – […]

Bloomberg Business Week Lip movements when signing connect to spoken language rather than to signs, researchers find MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) — Although people move their mouths when they communicate in sign language, scientists have debated whether the lip movements were part of signing or whether they’re connected directly to spoken language.

Here it is Deaf Cornholer’s…. Spread the First Annual Ohio Deaf Cornhole Association Big Event, October 9, 2010 news to everyone… Let me know if interested buying Woodgamz products…. Map behind flyer… Come out to play or social… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . […]

Suspect in Alaska police killings surrenders

WHEC Rochester, NY Posted at: 08/30/2010 3:26 PM A man accused of killing two police officers in a small Alaska village surrendered to authorities Monday. John Marvin Jr. turned himself in shortly before 10 a.m., according to a local official in the southeast Alaska village of Hoonah.

Dealing Your Impotency Issues with Vardenafil HCL 20mg

Problems with penile erection may seem a simple problem but somehow can make a man’s life miserable. For one, the ill condition can greatly affect a person emotionally due to accumulation of anxiety, depression, and the fear of being rejected. Certain diseases have also been proven to link with impotency, such as heart problems and the loss of sexual libidos. In short, erection problems can deteriorate a man’s overall health – both the psychological and physical aspect. It has the potential to destroy romantic relationships and even worst, can lead to serious psychological problems. Recently, specific drugs have been designed to counteract with erection dysfunction – Vardenafil hcl 20mg, the most recommended medication by physicians to improve sexual performance among men.

Read more…

Bring It On

I’m about to fall asleep when my husband, Ron, reaches out and shakes my shoulder.

“Are you awake?” he asks.

“Yes,” I say.

“What do you want for your birthday?”

“Hmmm,” I say. “I don’t know. Let me think about it.”

But I do know. I’m debating between various brands of juicers (Green Star or Omega – any thoughts?). Ron is going to keel over when he hears this. In the six years we’ve been together, I’ve never asked for a single item relating to the kitchen.

Not a pot.

Not a pan.

Not a knife, a spatula, or a whisk.

Growing up, I never learned how to cook. My girlfriends and I — we were women of a new generation. We were going to be doctors, lawyers, and mathematicians (and we are). There would be no time for preparing meals. (I’m not sure what our eating plan was — hired help? fast food? — we didn’t think about that part). I do vaguely recall taking a Home Economics course in high school. Men were required to take it too. We baked a pie. I stared at the aluminum container holding the crust and debated between leaving it or removing it. I wasn’t sure aluminum should go in the oven so I took it off. My pie looked more like a pancake.

People change, though.

Now I see our kitchen in a whole new light. Cooking spinach lasagna the other night, I sipped a glass of wine and turned on some tunes. I had to call my mother — twice — and ask her whether I was supposed to cook the whole wheat lasagna noodles or layer them in the dish uncooked. (The first time she said, “Cook ‘em!” and the second time she said, “Yes, I’m positive. Cook ‘’em!”) I cooked the noodles. The food was delicious. I’m no longer intimidated by the kitchen. Bring on the juicer! Š

Acorn Squash Dip with Roasted Pumpkin Seeds on Wasa

Ingredients

2 cups acorn squash, cooked
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons fat free half and half
½ cup diced onion
2 leaves fresh sage
2 teaspoons maple syrup
¼ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons roasted pumpkin seeds
1 package WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread

Directions

Slice open acorn squash and remove seeds. Place sliced side down in an 8 X 8 inch glass dish, cover and microwave on high until tender (approx 10 minutes).
Scoop out meat with a spoon when cooled and set aside.
Heat oil in a skillet. Add onion and whole sage leaves. Sauté until onions are transparent. Remove sage.
Add squash, half and half, maple syrup, and parmesan cheese. Mix well.
Spoon into bowl, sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and serve hot on a platter with crispbread.

TIP: May substitute WASA Oat, Sourdough Rye, Multigrain, or Rye Crispbread. Leftover dip may be stored in refrigerator for to 3 – 4 days.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Serves 6

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 254
Total Fat 6 g
Saturated Fat 6 g
Cholesterol 1 mg
Sodium 257 mg
Total Carbohydrate 52 g
Dietary Fiber 8 g
Protein 6 g
Calcium 57 mg

In the Beginning

Thanks to all who have stopped by and/or left comments as the Wasa blog gets underway.

A couple people mentioned that this blog has inspired them to try yoga. I know the feeling. My husband inspired me to try yoga years ago after I watched him ease into a backbend with grace. I’ve mentioned that before, but what I failed to mention was the fact that I didn’t like my first yoga class. Or my second. Or third;

I knew the benefits of yoga – flexibility, awareness, inner stillness – were practices I needed in my life, but during class I couldn’t hold the poses. It takes time to find balance and build strength. Also, the teacher wasn’t a good fit. Plus, I kept slipping on my mat because I was wearing socks. Not to mention my loose-fitting t-shirt flipped over my head when I’d bend over for Downward Facing Dog.

So my first suggestion is to wear comfortable “stretchy” clothes. Slip off your shoes (and socks) before entering the studio. Bare feet help you “stick” to the mat. If you don’t have a mat, you can rent one. Sometimes they’re free, sometimes $1.

Okay, now you’re in the studio before class has begun. Believe it or not this can be the most intimidating part.

A few years ago I remember encouraging a friend to try a yoga class. We were traveling in San Francisco and the class was at 6am. I couldn’t attend because of another obligation (um, I believe it was sleep), but my friend was a super early riser and decided to try yoga for the first time. Ten minutes later she clamored back into the room complaining that when she walked in the studio all the students were gathering foam blocks, long white straps, and bolsters, and she had no idea what these were, if she needed any, and, if so, which ones she should take.¼br />

Oh gosh, I felt awful for sleeping in. I had completely forgotten how many times I’ve felt that exact same way when I’ve tried something new. Like the first time I tried a spinning class. I was standing in the cool dark studio when a group of women walked in all holding biking shoes (biking shoes? Oops! I didn’t have those). Then they began turning knobs, lowering the seats, and adjusting the handlebars. I was outta there in 30 seconds (I went back the next day – it turns out you don’t need biking shoes and the instructor showed me how to adjust the parts – but still).

Even just a few weeks ago I tried a new yoga studio and noticed the students folding blankets in a manner I’d never seen before. I’ve been practicing yoga for years and I still felt a bit out of place. I wasn’t sure if I should fold the blanket “my” way or “their” way. That question was answered when the teacher began class and showed everyone what she wanted us to do.

So, a few more suggestions: don’t worry about the blocks, straps, and blankets. They are props to help people (like me) adjust in certain poses. If you need a prop during a pose, the yoga teacher will bring it to you, or you can ask her before class begins. Also, consider brining a friend to your first class if that would make you feel more comfortable (a friend who has practiced before can show you the ropes; if not, you two can navigate the waters together).

Now class has begun . . . and you don’t understand a word the teacher is saying. Chaturanga Dandasana? Urdhva Mukha Svanasana? Virabhadrasana II? The same thing happened to me in a dance class once where the teacher was using terms I’d never heard. The students around me began spinning and hopping and twirling about as I stood there, motionless and a little annoyed (it was a “beginners” class). Finally I gave up and tried to sneak out of the room. A woman came over and touched me on the shoulder, “You just don’t know the lingo yet. You’ll get the hang of it,” she promised.

And I promise – you’ll get the hang of yoga lingo. I do, however, recommend finding an “intro to yoga” course if you’re trying it for the first time. After trying yoga and not liking it, I finally went to this 2-day orientation at Yoga Works. Instead of jumping right into sun salutations, we sat in a circle and talked. The teacher showed us how to breathe, answered our questions, and walked us slowly through the fundamental poses. That’s when yoga began to change to my life.

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