Monthly Archives: August, 2010

Northern Virginia Sign Language Club Invites you to our 2010 Friday Silent Game Nights

Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences

Northern Virginia Association of the Deaf General Meeting and 2009 R.I.A. Award Ceremony *Thursday, September 9, 7:30 P.M.*

WHAM Reported by: Sean Carroll Email: Last Update: 6:28 am Henrietta, NY – Anthony “Tony” Wallace lived in Rochester for about decade; first as a standout wrestler for R.I.T. and later as a coach and campus safety officer.  Wallace, friends and colleagues say, made a habit out of achieving goals he set for himself.  At the […]

UPI Published: Aug. 30, 2010 at 7:17 PM HOONAH, Alaska, Aug. 30 (UPI) — A suspect was taken into custody Monday after a standoff with police and charged with killing two Alaska police officers, one of whom was deaf, police said. The standoff ended at 9:30 a.m. when John Marvin Jr., 45, walked out of […]

Greetings friends! This is a reminder of upcoming events on Sept 4.  All day FUN! District of Columbia Area Black Deaf Advocates hosts LABOR DAY COOKOUT/CRUISE COOKOUT Saturday, September 4, 2010 KDES Pavilion Area 800 Florida Ave, NE Washington, DC 10:00 am to 6pm Come for great food, games and fun!!! Lunch 12:00 noon – […]

Bloomberg Business Week Lip movements when signing connect to spoken language rather than to signs, researchers find MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) — Although people move their mouths when they communicate in sign language, scientists have debated whether the lip movements were part of signing or whether they’re connected directly to spoken language.

Here it is Deaf Cornholer’s…. Spread the First Annual Ohio Deaf Cornhole Association Big Event, October 9, 2010 news to everyone… Let me know if interested buying Woodgamz products…. Map behind flyer… Come out to play or social… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . […]

Suspect in Alaska police killings surrenders

WHEC Rochester, NY Posted at: 08/30/2010 3:26 PM A man accused of killing two police officers in a small Alaska village surrendered to authorities Monday. John Marvin Jr. turned himself in shortly before 10 a.m., according to a local official in the southeast Alaska village of Hoonah.

Special Occasions

The street is cleared of traffic, the tents are up, and the vendors are selling summer squash, cherries, and herbs. It’s the second week this season the farmers’ market has been open in town, and my husband escapes from the office so we can enjoy lunch together and wander by the open-air booths. We buy bread (baked from scratch) from one of our favorite vendors and discuss what we can grill, cook, and drink over the next few days.

As we walk, I start thinking about how I’ll be spending a lot more time at farmers’ markets this summer than I have in the past – it’s easier to find local, sustainably-grown food here than at the grocery stores. I’ve always enjoyed farmers’ markets, but I’ve tended to reserve them for “special occasions.” When I lived in Los Angeles my friends and I would load up with market goodies before going to a concert at the Hollywood Bowl, or for a picnic at the beach, or if we had guests coming to town.

With over 3500 farmers’ markets in the United States (visit LocalHarvest.org to find one near you) there are plenty here on the east coast where I currently live. I’ll be visiting more of them over the next few days to get a feel for the ones I prefer, talk to vendors, and gather local meat, eggs, and more fruit and veggies. I know I have my work cut out for me this summer as I learn how to prepare meals, can tomatoes, and make my own salad dressing. But taking the first step and creating the intent to eat clean is one of the biggest hurdles. Besides, it feels good to realize that what used to be a “special occasion” will now be a part of daily life.

Mix it Up

Staying at our retreat home in the mountains of Colorado has me thinking about water. I constantly see large vehicles with oversized plastic containers strapped into their truck beds, full of water. Water is hauled all over the place. It’s dry out here.

I’ve actually become a bit paranoid about water. What is the healthiest way to drink it? Should I gulp tap water and risk consuming substances like chlorine and fluoride, not to mention whatever else the water might be picking up as it flows through the pipes? Or should I buy water in a bottle and risk consuming leeched chemicals from the plastic, not to mention hurting the environment (plastic water bottles take 1000 years to biodegrade)? And if I do opt for store bought water, what should I purchase? Spring? Distilled? Glacial?

The more I read about water, the more confusing the facts. I find this to be the case with fish too (Eat it – it’s good for you! Don’t eat it – tuna contains mercury, fish handlers get infections when capturing rockfish, etc.!)

Here’s my current theory: instead of devoting myself to one type of water (tap, spring, well) I mix it up. That way, I figure I’ll get a variety of chemicals but (hopefully) in miniscule amounts. I take the same approach with fish. I’ll eat tuna on occasion, but not too often. Same with salmon and shrimp and sole. So that’s my theory and I’m stickin’ to it.  Š

Natural Sugars

So, I’m off to see a naturopath. I’m still trying to figure out the fertility thing, and I’d like to learn more about this healing method of treatment. Diet is the first thing a naturopath evaluates (I think) – so it should be interesting to hear what she thinks of my eating habits. My no coffee, no alcohol, and increased intake of fruits and vegetables seems to be going okay (sure, there’s hiccups along the way, but not too many). But the no sugar plan? That’s tough. I’m off it, then back on it. Off. On. Off. On. OffOnOffOnOffOnOffOn. Lately, in order to satisfy my cravings, I’ve been snacking on a little sweet treat in the late afternoons (mostly chocolate). Sugar depresses the immune system drastically. And after reading up on the potential harm sugar can do to my body (feed cancer cells, contribute to autoimmune diseases, weaken eyesight, and so on) I actually felt fear rising inside me. But while fear can be a strong motivator, what really moves me into action is knowing how healthy and healed and clean I’ll be and feel when I eliminate sugar from my diet. I already know the next step. Instead of satisfying my craving with candy, I should switch to treats that have been sweetened with natural sugars, like maple syrup and raw honey. Okay . . . back to the kitchen to experiment with more recipes.

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

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