Monthly Archives: August, 2010

Northern Virginia Sign Language Club Invites you to our 2010 Friday Silent Game Nights

Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences

Northern Virginia Association of the Deaf General Meeting and 2009 R.I.A. Award Ceremony *Thursday, September 9, 7:30 P.M.*

WHAM Reported by: Sean Carroll Email: Last Update: 6:28 am Henrietta, NY – Anthony “Tony” Wallace lived in Rochester for about decade; first as a standout wrestler for R.I.T. and later as a coach and campus safety officer.  Wallace, friends and colleagues say, made a habit out of achieving goals he set for himself.  At the […]

UPI Published: Aug. 30, 2010 at 7:17 PM HOONAH, Alaska, Aug. 30 (UPI) — A suspect was taken into custody Monday after a standoff with police and charged with killing two Alaska police officers, one of whom was deaf, police said. The standoff ended at 9:30 a.m. when John Marvin Jr., 45, walked out of […]

Greetings friends! This is a reminder of upcoming events on Sept 4.  All day FUN! District of Columbia Area Black Deaf Advocates hosts LABOR DAY COOKOUT/CRUISE COOKOUT Saturday, September 4, 2010 KDES Pavilion Area 800 Florida Ave, NE Washington, DC 10:00 am to 6pm Come for great food, games and fun!!! Lunch 12:00 noon – […]

Bloomberg Business Week Lip movements when signing connect to spoken language rather than to signs, researchers find MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) — Although people move their mouths when they communicate in sign language, scientists have debated whether the lip movements were part of signing or whether they’re connected directly to spoken language.

Here it is Deaf Cornholer’s…. Spread the First Annual Ohio Deaf Cornhole Association Big Event, October 9, 2010 news to everyone… Let me know if interested buying Woodgamz products…. Map behind flyer… Come out to play or social… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . […]

Suspect in Alaska police killings surrenders

WHEC Rochester, NY Posted at: 08/30/2010 3:26 PM A man accused of killing two police officers in a small Alaska village surrendered to authorities Monday. John Marvin Jr. turned himself in shortly before 10 a.m., according to a local official in the southeast Alaska village of Hoonah.

The Practice of Pause

In the most recent issue of Newsweek magazine, Robert J. Samuelson wrote a column titled The Sad Fate of the Comma.

He says:

I have always liked commas, but I seem to be in a shrinking minority. The comma is in retreat, though it is not yet extinct. In text messages and e-mails, commas appear infrequently, and then often by accident (someone hits the wrong key). Even on the printed page, commas are dwindling. Many standard uses from my childhood (after, for example, an introductory prepositional phrase) have become optional or, worse, have been ditched. If all this involved only grammar, I might let it lie. But the comma’s sad fate is, I think, a metaphor for something larger: how we deal with the frantic, can’t-wait-a-minute nature of modern life. The comma is, after all, a small sign that flashes PAUSE. It tells the reader to slow down, think a bit, and then move on. We don’t have time for that. No pauses allowed.

My husband came home from work a few hours after I read the article and mentioned that a yoga instructor had visited his office as part of their Wellness Program.

“Did you learn anything?” I asked.

He said he learned that if people took ten minutes out of their day to sit quietly and relax, scientific studies show stress levels reduce drastically. In other words, he learned it’s important to pause.

He had a worksheet from the Mind/Body Medical Institute. Click here for the full set of instructions, but in a nutshell it simply says to sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, and breathe (the easy part), as you clear your mind of active thoughts (the hard part).

Summers seems like an especially good time to incorporate the practice of pause because schedules can get so busy. You might be thinking: “That’s precisely the problem. I’m so busy I don’t have time to relax for 10 minutes.” But as the yoga instructor who visited my husband’s office mentions on her website, pausing will calm you down and clear your mind for better decision-making, ultimately giving you much more time.     Š

Child’s Pose

Alone in a cabin in the mountains, I put the kettle on the stove. My husband left yesterday to return to the city, and I have a few days to myself before more relatives arrive. I want to take this time to better develop my “home” yoga practice.

After hot oatmeal, tea, and a refreshing shower, I’m ready. In the past, I would quickly find myself intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of practicing yoga without a teacher and other students, but I recently read an article that put me at ease. It suggested starting with one pose – just one – and building from there.

One pose?

Well. In that case, Child’s Pose.

So that is what’s on my agenda as I walk over to the blue mat rolled out on the floor. It seems appropriate to “open” my practice, so I sit with my legs crossed and chant three Oms (can you believe it – no other voices to drown out mine).

Then I got on my hands and knees and folded back into Child’s Pose. I stayed in the active position instead of the passive position.

I’ve always loved this pose. A wonderful stretch. Also – and I’m not sure if the yoga experts would agree here – but to me it feels like a gratitude pose, bowing down and saying Thanks. Finally, it’s a relaxation pose – not just for the body, but for the mind.

I try to let go of my worries. I can hear the fire crackle in the woodstove behind me. I feel it’s warmth on my back. I sink into the Earth as the tops of my feet and the palms of my hands press into the ground. After a few minutes I lift my head. For awhile I turn around and gaze at the yellow flames through the woodstove’s glass door.

Not bad for my first day, I think. Tomorrow I’ll really shake things up with Child’s Pose and Tadasana. Š

Turkey and Avocado Wasa Sandwich

Ingredients

3 slices Havarti cheese, sliced thin
½ avocado, sliced thin
3 slices turkey breast
1 teaspoon olive oil
¼ cup tomatoes, finely minced
2 tablespoons purple onion, finely minced
1 tablespoon Italian flat leaf parsley, chopped
Salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
3 pieces WASA Hearty Rye Crispbread (may substitute any WASA Crispbread flavor)

Directions

Combine olive oil, tomatoes, purple onion, parsley, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Mix and set aside.
Place 1 slice of Havarti cheese, 1 slice of turkey breast, 3 thin slices of avocado on each crispbread. Top with tomato and onion mixture.

Serves 1

Nutritional Value Per Serving

Calories 180
Total Fat 9 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Cholesterol 34 mg
Sodium 150 mg
Total Carbohydrate 11 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Protein 13 g
Calcium 10% of daily value

Got ED? Solve it Using Tadalafil

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is not really uncommon as it seems because it is said that one in five men will experience it under varying severity.  This literally means that 20% of the male population will have some sort of erectile dysfunction.  If you are included among those 20%, you can call yourself very unfortunate because the condition deprives you of having a normal sex life.  Nevertheless, you can still consider yourself very fortunate, even if you have ED, because you now live in an age where the condition can be temporarily treated so you can fulfill not just your sexual needs, but the sexual needs of your partner as well.

There are different types of medications used in treating ED, such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil, avanafil, and tadalafil.  However, even though they are different, all of them are classified as PDE5 inhibitor drugs.  What this means is that even if these ED drugs have different active ingredients, their main course of action is still the same and that is the relaxing of the smooth muscles covering the penis to make blood be pumped effectively into the cavity within the penis in order to achieve an erection. Read more…

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