Monthly Archives: July, 2010

From White House

From the White House, President Obama’s message on ADA

NECA Washington Watch

Agenda 7/29/10—The FCC issued the agenda for its August 5th Open Meeting. The Commission will consider a Report and Order and FNPRM that enables consumers with hearing loss to enjoy the benefits offered by modern advanced telephone voice communication devices.

VIA NAD, FCC’s Video

FCC created a video celebrating ADA.

Submitted by NAD on Fri, 07/30/2010 – 13:43 On July 26, 2010, the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Twenty-first Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (H.R. 3101) with a vote of 348 to 23. The NAD thanks U.S. Representative Ed Markey (D-MA), for authoring, […]

Deaf, blind promised a better film experience Theater chains add captions, narration New technology allows the deaf to read captions projected onto a reflecting device they can screw into a cup holder. (Wgbh) Josh Pearson, who has been blind since shortly after he was born, has always loved going to the movies

Oralism leaves deaf children behind in our society

THE OLYMPIAN | • Published July 30, 2010 Years ago, a friend of mine told the story of his son’s birth. He recalled the doctor somberly gave the news that their son was deaf. The doctor was astonished when the parents hugged and rejoiced. They explained to the befuddled doctor that because he was deaf, […]

Updated Flyer from RDMC

Shugoll Research is currently conducting a research study with people 18 and older who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.  

Published: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Khalil AlHajal | The Flint Journal FLINT — A deaf woman who struggled for two weeks to communicate with doctors and nurses as she underwent tests and was diagnosed with kidney cancer now is being provided with sign language interpreters 24 hours a day, according to family members who fought […]

Thursday, July 29, 2010  02:54 AM By Bill Bush THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH The Ohio School Facilities Commission will have to rebid contracts to replace the state’s schools for the blind and deaf after bids came in at least 41percent over the estimated cost of construction.

Retraining Taste Buds

The carrots I hold in my hand are fresh from a local garden. They’re dirty and have wild bushy green tops. I wash and peel the carrots then pick up the knife. I have a long way to go until I can maneuver this utensil like those chefs on the Food Network, but I’m getting better. Faster.

I cut the carrots, chop the onion, dice the celery, slice the mushrooms and throw everything into a skillet with water. While the veggies are steam sautéing I boil tri-colored pasta in a medium pot and steam spinach in a small one. I add tomatoes and tomato sauce to the skillet. When the pasta and spinach are ready I add those too, along with garlic and oregano.

My husband, Ron, wanders in the kitchen.

“What’s for dinner?” he asks.

“Italian Skillet Casserole,” I say.

He leans over my shoulder and investigates the simmering dish on the stovetop.

“Almost all veggies,” I point out.

Cooking healthier foods has been challenging in certain ways, but one thing I completely forgot about when I started this new path is that my husband can’t stand vegetables. He’ll eat certain items (broccoli or beans or salad) because he knows they’re good for him, but he would prefer them as a side dish, not the main dish.

But it just so happens that his company is having a Vegetable Challenge this summer.

So perfect timing.

I scoop out the meal into two bowls, light some candles, and sit down.

It’s delicious, and I look at Ron to see what he thinks. He’s pushing a piece of onion, a hunk of tomato, and a mushroom slice to the side. “I can eat them when they’re small, but these big pieces…” he shakes his head.

“You need to retrain your taste buds,” I suggest softly.

He’s a good sport so he takes a huge spoonful, onion chunks and all, and gives it a go. He likes it. This truly is one of the tastier dishes I’ve made, and when I’m done I push my bowl aside and lean back in the chair.

“Hey, what’s that?” Ron says, peering into my bowl.

“Nothing,” I say.

“Uh-huh,” Ron nods, smirking.

Okay, okay. So I really do consider myself a vegetable lover, but I’ve always struggled with cooked carrots. There is small pile of them left. I guess we both have some retraining to work through.

Top 10 Reasons I Love My Juicer

10. My produce never goes to waste anymore

9. No cooking, baking, stirring, or waiting. Just slice, juice, and drink (well, and clean)

8. Extra veggies, extra veggies, extra veggies – for both me and my spouse

7. My dog likes the scraps (dry pulp) mixed in with her meal

6. I feel clean and healthy and energized

5. The machine also makes baby food, nut butters, and pasta

4. Studies show juicing helps prevents disease

3. Juicing offers a great source of enzymes which are often destroyed by heat in cooked foods

2. It is the only way I’ll incorporate beets into my diet

1. Homemade food is the best. Hands down.

I must admit I was nervous about buying a juicer. They aren’t cheap (around $200 for a good one) and I was afraid I’d find juicing too inconvenient, resulting in a new nice appliance simply gathering dust in the corner of the kitchen. But I can’t emphasize enough how much I love it!

Herbs

One of my husbands charms is that if it’s my birthday, or a holiday, or some other gift-giving event, he’ll sneak in a surprise present – a little something extra that wasn’t on my list that he thought of completely on his own. For example, one year he gave me a handheld Ms. Pac-Man game because he knew I used to love Ms. Pac-Man s a kid (one time we came across the video machine in a restaurant, and I went nuts, challenging my husband to round after round until I had blisters).

So this year – after reading and observing me write the Wasa blog, and noticing my developing interest in cooking – he gave me an herb garden. Well, sort of. We don’t have real garden space in our city place, so he gave me a kit that you can assemble right on your countertop.

Mint.
Basil.
Dill.
Cilantro.
Thyme.
Parsley.
Chives.

My mom and I put together this afternoon.

We snapped a light onto the “garden” and popped in the seed pods.

“Can it really be this easy?” I said.

It was.

We added some water, feed it some nutrients, and left it to grow.

It takes about five weeks until the herbs will be ready for harvesting.

First recipe? I’m thinking a garden herb omelet.

Happy

The other day, I was in a “blah” mood due to my seasonal affective disorder (self-diagnosed). To snap out of it, I came up with a list of ten activities that are fun. Not just enjoyable, but playful and lively. The kind of activities that make me happy, happy, happy.

10 Fun Activities
1. Rollerblading (I can’t help but grin like a fool whem I blade – I absolutely love it more than just about anything)
2. Dinner out with my husband
3. Waterskiing
4. Downhill Skiing
5. Watching a good romantic comedy
6. Tennis
7. Jumping on a trampoline
8. Throwing a Frisbee with my dog (she can leap in the air and catch it)
9. Riding rapids in a river
10. Snorkeling around coral reefs

Reviewing my list, it dawned on my how many were linked to physical activity – things that get my blood flowing. (Yoga isn’t on there because while I do enjoy it – love it, actually – I think of it as more of a calming practice.) I don’t know where the trampoline came from – that one just popped into my head. Well, I’m so getting a mini tramp for my bedroom. When it’s cold and windy and rainy I’ll get some physical exercise and make myself laugh while I’m at it.

Bounce. Bounce. Bounce. Š

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