Monthly Archives: April, 2010

NECA Washington Watch

TRS Ex Parte—CG Docket No. 10-51 4/28/10—CSDVRS met with CGB and DRO staff to discuss a new rate structure for VRS.  CSDVRS said the FCC’s decision to move to a tiered multi-year rate was the right decision, but also said the methodology could be improved.  CSDCRS proposed adding a fourth and fifth tier to the […]

Interpreted show at Nazareth

Please share if appropriate with other deaf people: I saw the play today with an interpreter. It was deeply moving. They informed me afterwards that they have an interpreter (same one) assigned for this Sunday as well. Just show up half hour early to buy tickets. Nazareth Box office asked me to encourage more deaf […]

Harrisburg offers to take deaf students

Associated Press – April 30, 2010 8:55 AM ET HARRISBURG, S.D. (AP) – The Harrisburg School District is offering to take the five remaining students at the South Dakota School for the Deaf. The Board of Regents, which oversees the Siou To see the rest of article  click on http://www.kcautv.com/Global/story.asp?S=12403594

Fundraising for DWR

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Gloucester candidates take questions from deaf voters

Sign language interpreters were used to help with communication BBC News United Kingdom General election candidates for Gloucester have been taking questions from deaf people in the city with the help of interpreters. The panel included Conservative Richard Graham, the Liberal Democrat’s Jeremy Hilton and Parmjit Dhanda, who is defending the seat for Labour. Organisers […]

UM student wins $10,000 prize for video

WITHOUT A SOUND Bangor Daily News (Maine) 4/30/10 | By Jessica Bloch BDN Staff BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY JESSICA BLOCH Samantha Danis ORONO, Maine — It seems fitting that on the night Samantha Danis found out she’d won a national award for her video documentary work, she was out to dinner with a group […]

Two Rochester School for the Deaf students won first-place

Democrat and Chronicle Rochester, NY Two Rochester School for the Deaf students won first-place in their team division of the 2010 Rochester Institute of Technology National Science Fair for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Middle and High School Students, held March 26-27on the RIT campus. Eighth-grader Allison Higgins of Leicester and seventh-grader Madilyn Smith of […]

Baseball team featured in ‘USA Today’; attends White House ceremony with New York Yankees

President Barack Obama greets Baseball Head Coach Curtis Pride at the White House. Photo by Sam Atkinson. Members of the baseball team and Athletics staff stand outside the White House’s East Room during their visit. Photo by Sam Atkinson. In less than 24 hours, the Gallaudet baseball team met President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe […]

Gallaudet University baseball team invited to the White House, witness New York Yankees ceremony with President Obama

Apr 26, 2010 Gallaudet University baseball team invited to the White House, witness New York Yankees ceremony with President Obama WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Gallaudet University baseball team had a front row seat to history on Monday afternoon as the Bison were special guest of U.S. President Barack Obama to attend a ceremony to recognize […]

Rockville, MD – Managing the Stress Related to Hearing Loss

Managing the Stress Related to Hearing Loss Speaker: Dr. Samuel Trychin psychologist, educator, author Saturday, May 15, 2010 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Rockville Memorial Library 21 Maryland Avenue Rockville, MD 20850 Registration required. Online registration available at www.montgomerycountymd.gov/library For more information about this program, contact: Joan Kleinrock at <mailto:> Presented by Hearing Loss […]

Halloween

I’m debating what to do about Halloween.

I loved dressing up and collecting candy as a kid. But as an adult – and someone with a growing awareness of our country’s health crisis – I don’t want to encourage the consumption of sugar, high fructose corn syrup, artificial flavorings…you get the idea.

I could hand out boxes of raisins, but I hated that as a child.

I could hand out toothbrushes, but again, that’s no fun.

I could bake something – treats using crispy brown rice cereal and natural peanut butter – but I know homemade goods would get thrown out by vigilant parents.

I have a friend who has her kids put their loot in a pile before bed. During the night the Great Pumpkin comes and Poof! their candy is turned into little games and trinkets from the dollar store. I also know a dentist who gives money in exchange for the kids who turn in their candy.

Hmm.

I was reading a recent issue of Body & Soul magazine and saw a small article on fair trade. Most chocolate, the article said, is exported from the Ivory Coast where kids aren’t going to school because they’re working on cocoa farms to help with family income. Buying fair trade products ensures that the money goes directly to the farmers and their communities instead of all the middlemen. And it just so happens that you can buy individually wrapped pieces of fair trade dark chocolate (according to some studies, dark chocolate does have a few health benefits).

Click here for a link to the article and a list of the companies.

Blue Zones

Blue Zones are places in the world where people live “astoundingly long lives” – for example, reaching the age of 100 three times the rate of Americans. And suffering a fifth the rate of heart disease. Imagine being able to hold your great-great-grandchild one day . . .

I first learned of Blue Zones when one of the editors I work with went on a “Quest” to the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, one of the four Blue Zones (the others are Okinawa, Japan, Loma Linda, California, and Sardinia, Italy).

Dan Buettner, a journalist who worked extensively on researching these communities, has come out with a book titled The Blue Zone. I want to read the book in context, so I’m refraining from skipping ahead, but based on the Blue Zones website and other articles I’ve read, I know some of the lifestyle practices of centurions are (1) plant based diets (not necessarily vegetarian, but plant-based); (2) laughter; (3) spirituality; (4) family; and (5) physically active lives (like gardening and laboring).

Just because Washington DC isn’t a Blue Zone doesn’t mean my body and my house can’t be one.

Welcome, Loved One

A few weeks ago I was in Tulum, Mexico for a week of yoga, meditation and silent beach walks. I arrived at night after everyone else had gone to sleep. Inside my cabana two flickering candles revealed a comfy bed draped in mosquito netting with a welcome card on the pillow. I picked up the card and read what was written. Holding it next to my heart I smiled. Then I crawled under the covers and drifted off to sleep.

The next morning as I was journaling in my notebook, I thought about the card and scribbled down what it had said: You are worth loving. I had a funny feeling that what I wrote wasn’t quite right, so I went back to my cabana to double-check. Sure enough, I had misquoted the card. It actually read: I am worth loving.

Notice the difference?

Why is it so easy to believe others are worth loving, but so hard to believe it about ourselves? Why is it difficult to say? To know? To live?

This isn’t a narcissistic kind of love; rather, it’s a “love your neighbor as yourself” kind of love. Eating mindfully, treating ourselves with kindness, practicing yoga — these are ways we can love ourselves by being stewards of our body and soul.

I began practicing yoga years ago after watching my then-boyfriend (now husband) ease into a backbend with grace. To this day I still can’t do that, but it doesn’t matter because self-love is about accepting myself for who I am, not what I can achieve. I will be blogging about yoga twice a week for the Eat Wasa Feel Good team (my partner, Zandria, introduced herself yesterday as the vegan blogger).

So here’s a warm welcome to you, loved one, and an invitation to join me on this journey. Feel free to post comments, questions or ideas. You can also e-mail me or visit my personal blog, Roughly Speaking.

Oh, by the way, my name is Jenny. And I am worth loving.

That Was Easy

I wanted to pop two pills.

After taking the summer off, I played tennis for nearly two hours yesterday and my legs ached from my hips down to my ankles. Also, I had a headache.

Oh, how I wanted ibuprofen to be the answer! Pop the meds, mask the pain, and let me go to sleep. But I decided to hold off. A few little thoughts floated around in my head: What is my body trying to tell me? Could yoga help?

The headache was probably because I was dehydrated. It was hot on the courts. I drank some water and then set the glass down on a table. Sitting on the floor, I raised my arms over my head, clasped my hands together, and turned my palms towards the ceiling. I lowered onto my back and squeezed one knee into my chest while keeping the other leg straight. Switched sides. I did a few spinal twists to remove the stiffness in my hips. Gentle, easy stretches. And I felt so much better afterwards.

That was easy. And it took less than twenty minutes – the time it would’ve taken the ibuprofen to reach my system.

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